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Probably I have a stupid question, but I am not able to make it working. I am doing the AES encryption\decryption in F# according to the MSDN example which is in C#:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.security.cryptography.aes.aspx

My encryption method is as follows:

let EncryptStringToBytesAes (plainText : string) (key : byte[]) (iv : byte[]) =
    use aesAlg = Aes.Create()
    aesAlg.Key <- key
    aesAlg.IV <- iv
    // Create a decrytor to perform the stream transform.
    let encryptor = aesAlg.CreateEncryptor(aesAlg.Key, aesAlg.IV)
    // Create the streams used for encryption. 
    use msEncrypt = new MemoryStream()
    use csEncrypt = new CryptoStream(msEncrypt, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write)
    use swEncrypt = new StreamWriter(csEncrypt)
    swEncrypt.Write(plainText)
    msEncrypt.ToArray()

The problem is that this method always returns me an empty array of bytes. I do not have any exception. Key and IV are proper arrays of bytes. Seems like the StreamWriter is not working...

Thank you for help.

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As a simplification you can use encryptor.TransformFinalBlock. Using CryptoStream for short messages is unnecessarily convoluted. –  CodesInChaos Sep 6 '13 at 14:29
    
As a sidenote: 1) an IV needs to be randomly generated for each message. Reusing IVs across messages is not secure. 2) Don't forget to add a proper MAC in an encrypt-then-mac scheme. Else active attacks like padding oracles can easily break your encryption. –  CodesInChaos Sep 6 '13 at 14:31

3 Answers 3

Before you call msEncrypt.ToArray you must flush all intermediate streams, or close them, because they are buffering data.

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I have done the Flush() but it is still not working. I have done like this: swEncrypt.Write(plainText); swEncrypt.Flush(); csEncrypt.Flush(); msEncrypt.ToArray() –  user2323704 Sep 5 '13 at 12:30
    
That should work. Use the debugger to find out what the streams contain after each line, and make sure that plainText is not empty. –  usr Sep 5 '13 at 12:35
    
I have debugged, the StreamWriter and CryptoStream have the plaintext bytes, but the MemoryStream not... –  user2323704 Sep 5 '13 at 12:41
1  
Now I get it. You can't flush the CryptoStream because that does not make sense. It operates on whole blocks only. It cannot flush a partial block. Close all streams instead. –  usr Sep 5 '13 at 12:44
    
Thank you, I have done swEncrypt.Close() and csEncrypt.Close() and now I get the result. But how calling the Close() is affecting that I am using the F# "use" keyword? I guess that it will be closed two times and Microsoft does not recommend such situation. –  user2323704 Sep 5 '13 at 12:47

Building on @usr's answer...

The easiest way to make sure the stream is closed is to place the use statements within a block that goes out of scope before ToArray is called.

let EncryptStringToBytesAes (plainText : string) (key : byte[]) (iv : byte[]) =
    use aesAlg = Aes.Create()
    aesAlg.Key <- key
    aesAlg.IV <- iv
    // Create a decrytor to perform the stream transform.
    let encryptor = aesAlg.CreateEncryptor(aesAlg.Key, aesAlg.IV)
    // Create the streams used for encryption. 
    use msEncrypt = new MemoryStream()
    (
      use csEncrypt = new CryptoStream(msEncrypt, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write)
      use swEncrypt = new StreamWriter(csEncrypt)
      swEncrypt.Write(plainText)
    )
    msEncrypt.ToArray()
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Is there any advantage of parentheses over do? –  ildjarn Sep 5 '13 at 16:18
2  
Only if you're a LISPer. –  Daniel Sep 5 '13 at 16:59
up vote -1 down vote accepted

To make it working we need to explicitly close the StreamWriter and CryptoStream

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