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This is one question, asked to me a interview, on which I have no idea what he is asking.
If you can help on the same:

sleep, wait, notify, yield - which one is a callback?

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4 Answers 4

None of the methods you list are callbacks. The entire Thread class contains only one user-overridable method, and that is run, which may be considered a callback method for that class because it is called by Thread's internals. However, a best practice is not to extend Thread at all. Supply your own Runnable implementation, which has its callback run method.

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None of those look like traditional callbacks. A callback function/method is something you register to be called once an operation is complete (possibly asynchronously if the task is scheduled in another thread).

Sleep, wait and yield essentially block execution until their conditions are met. Notify wakes threads blocked by wait.

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Is yield() really considered as a blocking call? –  Eng.Fouad Sep 5 '13 at 12:11
    
@Eng.Fouad: I consider it blocking as it doesn't kick off any asynchronous process. It's much like sleep in that execution continues from that point once the thread is started back up. –  Kainsin Sep 5 '13 at 12:16

A callback is a method that is created to be called at a certain time/event from elsewhere.

sleep(), wait(), and yield() are called by the thread to perform an action. notify() may be interpreted as one, and as such is the more correct answer if one is correct, though none are.

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None of them are traditional callbacks

Notify is the one that may look like doing the function of a callback, Taking the waiting processes to runqueue.

sleep() - current thread put to wait for a specified amount of time
wait() - current thread put into wait queue
yield() - current thread gives up its rest of the cpu cycle to some other thread
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