Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two div's setup that when clicked on a link switch from blue to orange. The sit in the same place and just give the impression of swapping from one colour to the other. This is my jquery:

jQuery(document).ready(function( $ ) {
    $(".dab").click(function(){
        $("#pf-orange-area").show();
        $("#pf-blue-area").hide();
    });
    $(".pfs").click(function(){
        $("#pf-orange-area").hide();
        $("#pf-blue-area").show();
    });
});

How I keep that functionality but also make them switch every 10 secs automatically?

share|improve this question
4  
why two jQuery(document).ready(function( $ ) –  Pilot Sep 5 '13 at 12:06
    
@captain Inexperience! I'll merge them into one. –  Rob Sep 5 '13 at 12:07
    
A great idea would be to put the actual color switching into a function and then simply call that function in a setTimeout and in the click handler. –  Lix Sep 5 '13 at 12:07
    
They can be nested together, no need to check if the document is ready twice. Not WRONG as such, just no need for it. –  Myles Sep 5 '13 at 12:07
1  
setInterval might be more appropriate, as it is to change every 10secs –  msturdy Sep 5 '13 at 12:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted
jQuery(function($) {

    var $or = $("#pf-orange-area"),
        $bl = $("#pf-blue-area"),
        changeColor;

    $(".dab").click(function(){
        $or.show();
        $bl.hide();
    });

    $(".pfs").click(function(){
        $or.hide();
        $bl.show();
    });

    changeColor = function() {
        $or.toggle();
        $bl.toggle();
    };

    setInterval(changeColor, 10000);
});

Thus, one of his colored elements must come now hidden and the other displayed.

share|improve this answer

Use setInterval() in your code. Something like this

jQuery(document).ready(function ($) {
    var toggle = function () {
        $("#pf-orange-area, #pf-blue-area").toggle();
    }
    var anim = setInterval(toggle, 1000);
    $('button').on('click', function () {
        clearInterval(anim);
    });
});

To pause/stop animation then

clearInterval(anim);

Check this Updated JSFiddle

share|improve this answer
    
This won't toggle them, though... –  Johan Sep 5 '13 at 12:08
    
@user1671639 Is that in addition to my code? –  Rob Sep 5 '13 at 12:09
    
@Rob I'm trying to show a code sample. So you can easily understand. –  Praveen Sep 5 '13 at 12:09
    
@Rob check this jsfiddle.net/S8cGZ –  Praveen Sep 5 '13 at 12:18

setInterval should work here.

Consider:

window.setInterval(yourfunction, 10000); //10000 = 10 sec

function yourfunction() { alert('test'); } //whatever you want it to do, test is purely for demonstration purposes
share|improve this answer
1  
A better practice is to define the functions before are being used. Code-Redability-sake –  Roko C. Buljan Sep 5 '13 at 12:10
    
That's true. I wasn't thinking about readability at the time of answering! You should see some of my code, far from readable haha. –  Myles Sep 5 '13 at 12:14
var b = true;

setInterval(function() {
   $( b ? '.dab' : '.pfs').trigger('click');
   b = ! b;
}, 10000);
share|improve this answer
    
or simply .click(); –  Roko C. Buljan Sep 5 '13 at 12:27
var i = 0,
handle = setInterval(function(){


    if(i%2 === 0){ //every other time (0,2,4 etc)

        $("#pf-orange-area").show();
        $("#pf-blue-area").hide();

    }else{ // every 'odd' time (1,2,3)

        $("#pf-orange-area").hide();
        $("#pf-blue-area").show();

    }    

    i++; 
},10000);

//to stop it:
//clearInterval(handle);

Depending on the initial visibility state, you might want to switch the if and else bodies.

share|improve this answer
    
Is that in addition to my code? –  Rob Sep 5 '13 at 12:09
    
@Rob Yes, let me know if anything is unclear. –  Johan Sep 5 '13 at 12:14
    
Instead of unnecessary repeating code, why not just e.g: $(".dab").click(); ? –  Roko C. Buljan Sep 5 '13 at 12:19
    
@RokoC.Buljan Instead of triggering a click, both cases should be added to a function, referenced as a click handler callback and triggered in the interval. Something I prefer over triggering an event. But I figured he might do something himself :) –  Johan Sep 5 '13 at 12:27

As others said you can use setInterval. but for implementation I suggest this:

function toggleAreas() {
    $("#pf-blue-area, #pf-orange-area").toggle();
}

$(document).ready(function(){
    setInterval(toggleAreas, 10000);
});
share|improve this answer

I saw you finally selected an answer, but figured i'd throw my two cents on in since I made this example with a long explanation. I hope this helps a bit in your understanding.

The first example has a variable for a timer, so that your 10 seconds can be reset everytime there is a change. This way, clicking on the elements having your class names also reset the timer.

Side Note: In the following examples I use .on(). If you're using a jQuery prior to 1.7, you can simply replace .on() with .live().

Example

var tmrShowHide;  //  this variable will act as out timer for keeping up with time changes
    //    if you don't want to reset the 10 seconds everytime there is a change, 
    //    then please see exmple 2
function divShowHide() {  //  this will be the method used to change the colors and reset the timer
    clearTimeout(tmrShowHide);    //    clears previous timer so 10 seconds is reset

    //  the .toggle method will simply toggle the visible state (display in css) of the element it's called upon
    //  so if we start with one hidden and one visible, then this is all that is needed to make the change!
    //  also note that i'm calling both elements at once, as they'll both undergo the "toggle" change
    $('#pf-blue-area, #pf-orange-area').toggle();

    tmrShowHide = setTimeout(divShowHide, 10000);    //    resets timer to 10 seconds
}

$(function() {  //  Same as $(document).ready(function() { // just shorter!
    //  the following establiches our click event on the 2 class types
    $(document).on('click', '.dab, .pfs', divShowHide);
    //  this will begin the timer and give us a variable that can be cleared as needed
    tmrShowHide = setTimeout(divShowHide, 10000);
})

So without comments its as simple as:

var tmrShowHide;
function divShowHide() {
    clearTimeout(tmrShowHide);
    $('#pf-blue-area, #pf-orange-area').toggle();
    tmrShowHide = setTimeout(divShowHide, 10000);
}

$(function() {
    $(document).on('click', '.dab, .pfs', divShowHide);
    tmrShowHide = setTimeout(divShowHide, 10000);
})



This next example is much shorter in that it doesn't reset the timer, thus, clicking on a class element to make the change will not stop it from changing every 10 seconds.

Example 2

function divShowHide(e) {  //  this will be the method used to change the colors
    //  the .toggle method will simply toggle the visible state (display in css) of the element it's called upon
    //  so if we start with one hidden and one visible, then this is all that is needed to make the change!
    //  also note that i'm calling both elements at once, as they'll both undergo the "toggle" change
    $('#pf-blue-area, #pf-orange-area').toggle();
}

$(function() {  //  Same as $(document).ready(function() { // just shorter!
    //  the following establishes our click event on the 2 class types
    $(document).on('click', '.dab, .pfs', divShowHide);
    //  this will begin the unstoppable 10 second timer
    setInterval(divShowHide, 10000);
})

So without comments its as simple as:

function divShowHide(e) {  $('#pf-blue-area, #pf-orange-area').toggle();  }

$(function() {
    $(document).on('click', '.dab, .pfs', divShowHide);
    setInterval(divShowHide, 10000);
})

The Blinker! (just for fun)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.