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I have a set of Spec tests I am executing within a Grails Project.

I need to execute a certain set of Specs when I am on local, and another set of Spec when I run the pre-prod environment. My current config is executing all my specs at the same time for both environements, which is something I want to avoid.

I have multiple environments, that I have configured in my GebConfig:

environments {
    local {
        baseUrl = "http://localhost:8090/myApp/login/auth"
    }

    pre-prod {
        baseUrl = "https://preprod/myApp/login/auth"
    }

}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use a spock config file.

Create annotations for the two types of tests - @Local and @PreProd, for example in Groovy:

import java.lang.annotation

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target([ElementType.TYPE, ElementType.METHOD])
@Inherited
public @interface Local {}

Next step is to annotate your specs accordingly, for example:

@Local
class SpecificationThatRunsLocally extends GebSpec { ... }

Then create a SpockConfig.groovy file next to your GebConfig.groovy file with the following contents:

def gebEnv = System.getProperty("geb.env")
if (gebEnv) {
    switch(gebEnv) {
        case 'local':
            runner { include Local }
            break
        case 'pre-prod':
            runner { include PreProd }
            break 
    }
}

EDIT: It looks like Grails is using it's own test runner which means SpockConfig.groovy is not taken into account when running specifications from Grails. If you need it to work under Grails then the you should use @IgnoreIf/@Require built-in Spock extension annotations.

First create a Closure class with the logic for when a given spec should be enabled. You could put the logic directly as a closure argument to the extension annotations but it can get annoying to copy that bit of code all over the place if you want to annotate a lot of specs.

class Local extends Closure<Boolean> {
    Boolean doCall() {
        System.properties['geb.env'] == 'local'
    }
} 

class PreProd extends Closure<Boolean> {
    Boolean doCall() {
        System.properties['geb.env'] == 'pre-prod'
    }
}

And then annotate your specs:

@Require(Local)
class SpecificationThatRunsLocally extends GebSpec { ... }

@Require(PreProd)
class SpecificationThatRunsInPreProd extends GebSpec { ... }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks erdi for you response, but how do I create annotations please, do you have examples? Tx –  ErEcTuS Sep 6 '13 at 15:23
    
See my updated response –  erdi Sep 6 '13 at 15:48
    
erdi, my SockConfig is not 'seen' by my grails application..and I put it at the same package as gebConfig. While debugging, the code inside spockconfig is never reached –  ErEcTuS Sep 9 '13 at 9:22
    
Is it called SpockConfig.groovy and located inside of test/functional directory of your grails project? Are you running your functional tests using grails test-app functional:? –  erdi Sep 9 '13 at 11:40
    
Yes, actually I'm running my test from IntelliJ and the command is :test-app functional:TestSpec –  ErEcTuS Sep 10 '13 at 12:39

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