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the following code produces this error:

error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "char const * __cdecl nameOnly(char const *)"

Code:

const char* nameOnly(const char* namewpath)
{
    const char* res = namewpath + strlen(namewpath);
    while (res > namewpath) {
        const char* tmp = res - 1;
        if (*tmp == '/' || *tmp == '\\') break;
        --res;
    }
    return res;
}

the above code is a plain c file and I'm compiling it with visual-C++. I don't get this error, when compiling with C-compiler.

UPDATE: I have tried using extern:

extern "C"{ 
 const char* nameOnly(const char* namewpath)
 {
    ...
    }
    return res;
 }
}

and I get this error:

error C2059: syntax error : 'string'
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by sashoalm, Josh Mein, SheetJS, Phillip Cloud, Dirk Sep 5 '13 at 15:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
where is string from? – billz Sep 5 '13 at 12:48
    
it points to the line where i "extern "C"{" is. – RayOldProf Sep 5 '13 at 12:51
    
Specifically see this answer - stackoverflow.com/a/12574420/492336 – sashoalm Sep 5 '13 at 12:52

Sounds like a difference between the function declaration and the function definition.

And when you say "this code is plain C", it's only plain C if the declaration is surrounded with extern C { ... } when the header file is included from a C++ implementation file, otherwise name mangling comes into play, which is what I believe this error is about.

share|improve this answer
    
of course char const* is the same as const char* – Gregory Pakosz Sep 5 '13 at 12:46
    
@GregoryPakosz Yes, my mistake. Editing. – trojanfoe Sep 5 '13 at 12:48
    
removed downvote – Gregory Pakosz Sep 5 '13 at 12:50

You need to use a header file that marks the function as extern "c" when compiling your code as part of a C++ project.

Inside nameOnly.h:

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C"{
#endif

const char* nameOnly(const char* namewpath);

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

Then inside nameOnly.c:

const char* nameOnly(const char* namewpath)
{
    const char* res = namewpath + strlen(namewpath);
    while (res > namewpath) {
        const char* tmp = res - 1;
        if (*tmp == '/' || *tmp == '\\') break;
        --res;
    }
    return res;
}

Now when some cpp file includes nameOnly.h, the function will be marked as extern "C" properly.

share|improve this answer
    
The extern "C" should be on the function declaration, not the definition, otherwise it has no effect (if this is a .c file when it's illegal, and if it's .cpp then it will work as expected). – trojanfoe Sep 5 '13 at 12:51
    
Yep I was in the middle of phrasing what I meant properly – Gregory Pakosz Sep 5 '13 at 12:54
    
removed downvote. – trojanfoe Sep 5 '13 at 12:54
extern "C"

will solve your problem of linkage because it tells the C++ compiler that a C compiler will also need to access this function but a C compiler does not understand this use of extern.

If you want to solve it you can do something like:

In your header file:

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C"{
#endif

const char* nameOnly(const char* namewpath);

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

and in your .c file:

const char* nameOnly(const char* namewpath)
{
    const char* res = namewpath + strlen(namewpath);
    while (res > namewpath) {
        const char* tmp = res - 1;
        if (*tmp == '/' || *tmp == '\\') break;
        --res;
    }
    return res;
}
share|improve this answer
    
sigh we made the same answer, but the first version of my version was messed up. +1 for you – Gregory Pakosz Sep 5 '13 at 12:58

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