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I am looking for a regular expression regex to match one of these patterns:

  • Number followed by x
  • Number separated by one or more space

I don't know if match is the correct method to achieve the results.

Matching examples:

' 30x '
'30x'
'20 30'
' 20 30 '

'30x'.match(regex).to_a #=> ['30']
'30 40'.match(regex).to_a #=> ['30', '40']
"30".match(regex).to_a # => ["30"]
" 30 ".match(regex).to_a # => ["30"]
"30 40".match(regex).to_a # => ["30", "40"]

Non-matching examples:

'20x 30 '
'x20 '

"30xx".match(regex).to_a # => nil
"30 a".match(regex).to_a # => nil
"30 60x".match(regex).to_a # => nil
"30x 20".match(regex).to_a # => nil

EDIT

Following @TeroTilus advice, this is the use case for this question:

The user will insert how he will pay an debt. Then, we've created a textfield to easily insert the payment condition. Example:

 > "15 20" # Generate 2 bills: First for 15 days and second for 20 days
 > "2x" # Generate 2 bills: First for 30 days and second for 60 days 
 > "2x 30" # Show message of 'Invalid Format'
 > "ANY other string" # Show message of 'Invalid Format'
share|improve this question
    
if you are trying to parse a css file, maybe you should use a parser instead. –  fotanus Sep 5 '13 at 13:08
    
@fotanus I'm not trying to parse a css file. –  Rodrigo Sep 5 '13 at 13:12
    
Do you have to do it in a single test? It's much easier and more readable to handle your two cases seperately. - Or rather, to identify your first case "a single number followed by x" and remove the x, thus causing the result to match your second case. –  Taemyr Sep 5 '13 at 13:40
1  
Oh man! This is no place for a regex. Put a little more effort on the UI to assist the user. Maybe something to choose the count of repayments and then default timings that the user can adjust if she wishes. Or something totally different that suits your use case. –  Tero Tilus Sep 5 '13 at 20:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about:

/^\s*\d+(?:x\s*|\s*\d+)?$/

explanation:

The regular expression:

(?-imsx:^\s*\d+(?:x\s*|\s*\d+)?$)

matches as follows:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?-imsx:                 group, but do not capture (case-sensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  ^                        the beginning of the string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \s*                      whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ") (0 or
                           more times (matching the most amount
                           possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \d+                      digits (0-9) (1 or more times (matching
                           the most amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?:                      group, but do not capture (optional
                           (matching the most amount possible)):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    x                        'x'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    \s*                      whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ") (0
                             or more times (matching the most amount
                             possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
   |                        OR
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    \s*                      whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ") (0
                             or more times (matching the most amount
                             possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    \d+                      digits (0-9) (1 or more times (matching
                             the most amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )?                       end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  $                        before an optional \n, and the end of the
                           string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
share|improve this answer

Try string.scan(/(^|\s+)(\d+)x?/).map(&:last), it probably does what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but "20x 30".scan(/(^|\s+)(\d+)x?/).map(&:last) returns ["20", "30"]. but it should returns nil. –  Rodrigo Sep 5 '13 at 13:10
    
Ah, you mean either sequence of digits followed by "x" or exactly two sequences of digits separated (and optionally surrounded) by space? Would that be the case? A little more use case context would definitely clarify. –  Tero Tilus Sep 5 '13 at 15:57
    
use case added! –  Rodrigo Sep 5 '13 at 20:31

This works for me

\d*x\s*$|\d*[^x] \d[^\s]*

share|improve this answer
    
"30x".match(/\d*x\s*$|\d*[^x] \d[^\s]*/).to_a #=> ["30x"] and should be 30 –  Rodrigo Sep 5 '13 at 13:44

I have newer written a single line of ruby so the syntax of the below might be horible

But, the easiest solution to your problem is; first reduce your first case to your second case, then do your matching for numbers.

Something like;

("20x 30".gsub/^\s*(\d+)x\s*$/,'\1').match(/\b\d+\b/)
share|improve this answer

This should work for the examples you gave.

^(?:\s*(\d+))+x?\s*$

^     # Match start of string
(?:   # Open non-capturing group
\s*   # Zero or more spaces at start or between numbers
(\d+) # Capture one or more numbers
)     # Close the group
+     # Group should appear one or more times
x?    # The final group may have an x directly after it
\s*   # Zero or more trailing spaces are allowed
$     # Match the end of the string

Edited to capture the numbers, not sure if you were looking to do this or just match the string.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to know if string match one of patterns, if yes, I need get the numbers. –  Rodrigo Sep 5 '13 at 13:54

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