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Has anybody tried SIP Delphi component? I bought it some time ago at a reasonable price with sources in order to replace the old code written for Dialogic HMP. It looks like mail support was not implied, docs and help were absent either though with available codes I was not going to have troubles. And they didn't appear until now when I got stuck with the problem I cannot find a solution to. The library during the call sends small RTP data packets via UDP every 20 ms and to keep these intervals equal it uses a winsdk function timeSetEvent. Here is the extracts from the code (I simplified it to make the things clearer):

Interface
type
// RTP packet header
TRTPHeader = packed record
   Byte80: Byte;
   PayloadType: Byte;
   SeqNo: WORD;
   TimeStamp: DWORD;
   SSRC: DWORD;
end; 

//RTP packet structure
TRTP = packed record
  H: TRTPHeader;
  Payload: packed array [0 .. 1023] of Byte;
end; 

//class realisation of ISipCall interface
TCall = class(TInterfacedObject, ISipCall)
  FRtpPacketToSend:TRTP;//RTP packet
//callback function, it is invoked by TMicrophoneThread regularly
  procedure OnMicrophone(const Buffer: Pointer);
end;

//Thread class for timing purposes
TMicrophoneThread = class(TThread)
public
  FCall: TCall;//call associated with this thread
  FEvent: THandle;// Event handle
  FTimerHandle: THandle;// Timer handle
  procedure Execute; override;
  constructor Create(const ACall: TCall);
  destructor Destroy; override;
end; 

implementation

procedure TCall.OnMicrophone(const Buffer: Pointer); //callback function, it is invoked by TMicrophoneThread regularly
var socket: TSocket;
begin
//preparing FRtpPacketToSend data, initializing socket, Remote server address
//win32 function, sends data to the “Remote” server
  sendto(socket, FRtpPacketToSend, sizeof(FRtpPacketToSend), 0, @Remote, SizeOf(Remote));
end;

//callback function invoked by windows timer every 20 ms
procedure Timer20ms(uTimerID, uMessage: UINT; dwUser, dw1, dw2: DWORD_PTR); stdcall; 
begin
  SetEvent(TMicrophoneThread(dwUser).FEvent);//Sets the TMicrophoneThread event
end;

constructor TMicrophoneThread.Create(ACall: TCall);
begin
  inherited;
  FCall:=ACall;
  FEvent := CreateEvent(nil, False, False, nil);
//Setting timer
  FTimerHandle := timeSetEvent(20, 0, @Timer20ms, Cardinal(Self), TIME_CALLBACK_FUNCTION + TIME_PERIODIC);
end;

destructor TMicrophoneThread.Destroy;
begin
  timeKillEvent(FTimerHandle);//removing timer
  CloseHandle(FEvent);
  inherited;
end;

procedure TMicrophoneThread.Execute;
var
  buf: array [0 .. 159] of SmallInt;//buffer data, looks like for storing data between function calls
begin
  FillChar(buf, SizeOf(buf), 0);
  Repeat
//waiting for the timer to set FEvent from Timer20ms function
    if (WaitForSingleObject(FEvent, INFINITE) <> WAIT_TIMEOUT) and not Terminated then
    begin
      if not Terminated then
        try
          FCall.OnMicrophone(@buf);
        except
        end;
    end;
  until Terminated;
end;

//Using these classes:
// Sip call object
Call:=TCall.Create;
// TMicrophoneThread object creates timer and every 20 ms invokes OnMicrophone function to send UDP data in realtime
Mth= TMicrophoneThread.Create(Call);

This code works fine, voice data flows smoothly. But to my surprise it works perfectly up until the number of simultaneous calls exceeds 16, the 17th and other calls do not receive timer signals. I found that this function is already marked as obsolete and some people encountered the same undocumented restrictions of this function - no more than 16 threads. Instead of timeSetEvent I tried using CreateTimerQueue/CreateTimerQueueTimer with different parameters:

implementation
var
  TimerQueue: THandle;
....
procedure WaitOrTimerCallback(lpParameter: Pointer; TimerOrWaitFired: BOOL); stdcall;
begin
  SetEvent(TMicrophoneThread(lpParameter).FEvent);
end;

constructor TMicrophoneThread.Create(ACall: TCall);
begin
  inherited;
  FCall:=ACall;
  FEvent := CreateEvent(nil, False, False, nil);
  //Setting timer
  CreateTimerQueueTimer(FTimerHandle, TimerQueue, @WaitOrTimerCallback, Self, 0, 20, 0);
end;
...
initialization
TimerQueue := CreateTimerQueue;

Also I tried Sleep and its more advanced realization based on QueryPerformanceFrequency/QueryPerformanceCounter:

procedure TMicrophoneThread.Execute;
var
  buf: array [0 .. 159] of SmallInt;
  waittime: integer;
begin
  FillChar(buf, SizeOf(buf), 0);
  repeat
    if not Terminated then
      try
        FCall.OnMicrophone(@buf);
        waittime:=round((Now - FCall.GetStartTime)*MSecsPerDay)
        if waittime<20 then
          Sleep(20-waittime)
      except
      end;
  until Terminated;
end;

All these possible solutions have the same problem - voice flow stops being continuous and you distinctively hear clicks during the playback especially if you have two or more calls. The only reason I can imagine is that timeSetEvent is more accurate than others. What can be done here?

share|improve this question
    
Do you have the source code for this library? –  David Heffernan Sep 5 '13 at 14:14
    
Yes, I do. Full source, one example, no help or any doc –  Molochnik Sep 5 '13 at 14:19
1  
The problem is that TimeSetEvent uses PIC and you are limited to maximum 16 timers (as you found out). I believe the best solution in your case is to use a waitable timer: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  whosrdaddy Sep 5 '13 at 14:30
    
Also, you got to keep in mind that windows is not a realtime OS and can schedule your thread to what ever CPU it wants. So if I were you, I would lock my time critical thread to one CPU using SetThreadAffinityMask(). –  whosrdaddy Sep 5 '13 at 14:38
    
I have tried waitable timers and they work significantly better than others though not so good as TimeSetEvent timer. As per the absence of realtime processing in Windows I knew about such windows flaw but didn't expect it could be so crucial for the real work. –  Molochnik Sep 27 '13 at 21:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Given that you have pinpointed a limit in the number of timers, a small design change to keep within that limit seems in order. Each timer currently does a negligible amount of work when procedure Timer20ms is called. So it seems feasible to allow a single timer to set multiple events.

As a first pass I'd try using only a single timer to set all the events.
I doubt this will be a solution because it's unlikely that signalling (resuming) a large number of TMicrophoneThread instances simultaneously won't cause other problems. But it will be useful to see how many can be handled smoothly (let's call it simultaneous-signal-limit); as this will likely be a factor in determining a hard limit before you need to look at scaling to better/more hardware.

constructor TMicrophoneThread.Create(ACall: TCall);
begin
  inherited;
  FCall:=ACall;
  FEvent := CreateEvent(nil, False, False, nil);
  { Instead of setting a new timer, add the event to a list. }
  TimerEvents.Add(FEvent);
end;

destructor TMicrophoneThread.Destroy;
begin
  { Instead of removing the timer, remove the event }
  TimerEvents.Remove(FEvent);
  CloseHandle(FEvent);
  inherited;
end;

procedure Timer20ms(uTimerID, uMessage: UINT; dwUser, dw1, dw2: DWORD_PTR); stdcall; 
{ The timer callback sets all events in the list. }
var
  LTimers: TList;
begin
  { I'm illustrating this code where TimerEvents is implemented as a TThreadList.
    If you can ensure all access to the list happens from the same thread,
    you'll be able to do away with the locks - which would be better.  }
  LTimers := TThreadList(dwUser).LockList;
  try
    for LoopI := 0 to LTimers.Count - 1 do
      SetEvent(THandle(LTimers[LoopI]));
  finally
    TThreadList(dwUser).UnlockList;
  end;
end;

Once this experiment is out the way, you could look at running multiple timers. Each with its own list. If you stagger the timers, and manage to get a reasonably fair distribution of TMicrophoneThread instances across each timer; you may be able to get close to handling 16 x simultaneous-signal-limit instance of TMicrophoneThread.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that's a great and simple idea, I don't quite understand how I couldn't come up with it myself :). I tried it and it works as expected up to 50-60 lines. This problem is solved but now when I went deeper into the library sources I started to find more and more poor coded places. It's really bad written and hardly scalable sip library where the sources is almost the only pro. I cannot recommend it to anyone who wants to build more than a simple sip soft phone. –  Molochnik Sep 27 '13 at 21:31

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