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Is there has any different by putting or not putting return in the the last line of function?

void InputClass::KeyDown(unsigned int input)
{
    // If a key is pressed then save that state in the key array
    m_keys[input] = true;
    return;
}
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3  
There is no difference. You have an extra line of code though. –  ToniBig Sep 5 '13 at 13:56
1  
I don't understand why there are so many answers especially when they all say the same thing. I of course think mine is the best (and I was first to answer) but think Shafik answer is the only one that could be better (than mine) –  acidzombie24 Sep 5 '13 at 14:00
3  
Someone is being payed by the line –  PlasmaHH Sep 5 '13 at 14:10
1  
There are already so many answers that I can't dare post one more, but I'd like to elaborate just a bit. As said it makes no difference here, but I can imagine it be enforced by some "corporate coding standard". Consider int f() { /* no return */ }, it causes a warning: no return statement in function returning non-void, but some (lazy) programmers just ignore warnings ("it compiles, it's ok"), so a convention may require to have a return as the last line of every function (even if empty). (Moreover, return; in int f() would cause an error, as return 1; in void g().) –  gx_ Sep 5 '13 at 14:20

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

No, there is no difference !

return in void functions is used to exit early on certain conditions.

Ex:

void f(bool cond)
{
    // do stuff here
    if(cond)
        return;
    // do other stuff
}
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There is functionally no difference in your example, if we look at the C++ draft standard section 6.6.3 The return statement paragraph 2 says:

A return statement with neither an expression nor a braced-init-list can be used only in functions that do not return a value, that is, a function with the return type void, a constructor (12.1), or a destructor (12.4). [...] Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function.

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In your particular code, No. But usually if you want to have an early return from the function based on a condition then use return.

void InputClass::KeyDown(unsigned int input)
{
    // If a key is pressed then save that state in the key array
    m_keys[input] = true;
    if(someCondition) //early return
       return;
   //continue with the rest of function 
   //.....
}
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In this particular case, it serves absolutely no purpose - it also won't cause any problems (e.g. no extra code is generated assuming the compiler has at least some optimisation ablities).

There is of course a purpose to putting a return in the middle of a void function, so that some later part of the function is not executed.

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No Difference, in your example,but if you want to an earlier return from the function in case,it is useful

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return in void functions has multiple roles:

  1. prematurely end function execution (e.g Algorithm finished, preconditions are not met)

  2. in certain cases you design the algorithm such that in 85% of the cases will end sooner. (thus executing faster) leaving the other 15% of the case go after that return (thus running slower for some rare race conditions.

  3. similar to a goto end.

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The question is specifically about having return in last line of the function! –  Ozair Kafray Sep 5 '13 at 16:44

In this case NOTHING. In other cases it might be because code is after the return statement and the author wanted to have it 'dead' for a little while. It should be deleted afterwards.

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No, they are same things.

Use return; when you want to exit function.

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