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I'm trying to make a basic card game, and in order to keep track of whose turn it is, I decided on making a game class, each instance of which is a separate game. Then when the game instance is initialised, it would also initialise the player objects and deck and card objects, and tie them to that game object. To do this I tried to pass the game object 'self' to the functions that initialise the other objects, so that they could refer back to the game object.

This has not worked. Edit: error is NameError: global name 'game' is not defined

Is the idea completely impossible/immoral/the-worst-thing-ever, or is it a perfectly viable way of achieving my aims, but I'm just implementing it incorrectly?

The whole code is at the end, but a cut-down version that hopefully will illustrate the scenario---or at least enough of it to answer the core question---in a less complicated way follows:

from collections import deque
from random import shuffle

DECK = {"value_range": (1, 6),
    "black_multiple": 2,
    "red_multiple": 2,
    "dead": 12}

class Game:
    """A game instance."""
    def __init__(self, deck=DECK):
        self.deck = Deck(self, **deck)
        self.deck.shuffle()   

class Deck:
    def __init__(self, game, value_range, black_multiple, red_multiple, dead):
        self.deck = deque()
        for value in range(*value_range):
            for i in range(black_multiple):
                self.deck.append(Card(game, value, "Black"))
            for i in range(red_multiple):
                self.deck.append(Card(game, value, "Red"))
        for i in range(dead):
            self.deck.append(Card(game))
    def shuffle(self):
        shuffle(self.deck)
    def draw(self):
        return self.deck.popleft()

And here is the whole (unfinished) code, for if that's not enough information:

from collections import deque
from random import shuffle

DECK = {"value_range": (1, 6),
        "black_multiple": 2,
        "red_multiple": 2,
        "dead": 12}

class Game:
    """A game instance."""
    def __init__(self, player_names=["Simon", "Will"], start_cards=2,
                 deck=DECK):
        self.deck = Deck(self, **deck)
        self.deck.shuffle()
        self.players = deque()
        for name in player_names:
            self.players.append(Player(self, name))
        for player in self.players:
            player.draw(start_cards)
    def lose(self, player):
#        print(player.name + "loses.")
        pass
    def new_turn(self):
        self.players.rotate(-1)
    def get_active(self):
        return self.players[0]
    def get_passive(self):
        return list(self.players)[1:]

class Card:
    """A card instance.

    Black cards get an extra method! Dead cards have value and colour False."""
    def __init__(self, game, value=False, colour=False):
        self.value = value
        self.colour = colour
        def get_value(self):
            return self.value
        def get_colour(self):
            return self.colour
        if self.colour == "Black":
            def action(self, target):
                active = game.get_active()
                responders = game.get_passive()
                for responder in responders:
                    if responder.respond(self.value) == False:
                        continue
                    else:
                        if target == active:
                            target = responder
                        else:
                            target = active
                        break
                target.draw(self.value)

class Player:
    def __init__(self, game, name):
        self.name = name
        self.hand = {}
    def draw(self, value):
        for i in range(value):
            try:
                draw_card = game.deck.draw()
            except IndexError:
                game.lose(self)
                break
            else:
                self.hand.append(draw_card)
                continue
    def get_hand(self):
        return self.hand

class Deck:
    def __init__(self, game, value_range, black_multiple, red_multiple, dead):
        self.deck = deque()
        for value in range(*value_range):
            for i in range(black_multiple):
                self.deck.append(Card(game, value, "Black"))
            for i in range(red_multiple):
                self.deck.append(Card(game, value, "Red"))
        for i in range(dead):
            self.deck.append(Card(game))
    def shuffle(self):
        shuffle(self.deck)
    def draw(self):
        return self.deck.popleft()

Thanks for taking the time to read this! I've not done much formal coding training/practice before, so I'm trying to muddle my way through learning Python by trial-and-error/PyDocs.

share|improve this question
1  
"This has not worked" -- Can you be more specific? What behavior are you seeing from your program and what behavior do you expect? Another thing that sometimes helps is to try to boil it down to a very small test program which you think should behave a certain way and verify that your mental model of the language is correct. –  mgilson Sep 5 '13 at 15:41
    
Also, use line breaks between methods, functions, and classes. –  aychedee Sep 5 '13 at 15:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you are doing should be fine. In your __init__ methods for Deck and and Player you should store the reference to game

def __init__(self, game, *args):
    self.game = game

You aren't doing that at the moment so I don't see how you would later reference the game.

For instance, in the player's draw method you do game.lose(). That needs to be self.game.lose() after you've assigned it to self in the __init__ method.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, thank you! That makes sense, should have thought of that. After clearing up a few other minor points that only surfaced once that was corrected (trying to append to a set amongst other things), it now works perfectly. I've spent most of the day trying to make that work, I am now very relieved. –  Simon Coppack Sep 5 '13 at 15:59
    
It's a simple misunderstanding to make when you are starting out. You might want to read about Python scopes and namespaces: docs.python.org/2/tutorial/… to really understand what is going on. But if you are just starting out then that can all be a bit confusing! There's no winning :) –  aychedee Sep 5 '13 at 16:14

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