Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Excluding Whitespace, BrainF*ck (and all those other languages not designed for practical usage), and assembly, what do you think is the most difficult real programming language to write readable code in, and why?

I find that I'm very comfortable reading code with C/C++ style braces and brackets. I can easily scan a file for method and class definitions, however in a language which does not use braces I find it extremely hard to read, eg: BASIC variants, specifically Visual Basic.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by casperOne Oct 16 '12 at 13:52

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
Here's an old phrase for you: "One can write Fortran in any language." –  Joel B Fant Oct 10 '08 at 16:12
3  
Assembly Programming! –  N 1.1 Mar 3 '10 at 3:08

52 Answers 52

up vote 74 down vote accepted

I find it easier to read languages which use brackets for breaking up blocks of code. For example C/C++, C#, D, and Perl.

The language which is in common use today, that I really find difficult to understand, is shell scripting. Plus the keyword you use to end a construct isn't always the mirror of the beginning keyword. I don't think anyone would use it if it wasn't already so widely used.

READABLE:

Perl

if(     $anything == 1 ){
    # some code
}elsif( $anything == 2 ){
    # some code
}else{
    # some more code
}

UNREADABLE:

Shell

if [ $a == z* ] # File globbing and word splitting take place.
then
  if [[ $a == z* ]] # True if $a starts with an "z" (regex pattern matching).
  then
    echo do-something  # But only if both conditions are valid.
  fi  
fi

I don't know about you, but I keep wanting to end the if block like this:

if [ $Jack && $Beanstalk ]
then
   echo plant beanstalk
fee fi fo fum

Further

Those people who automatically say Perl is a terrible language, generally assume that it is unreadable because they take one look at the Regex sub-language, and assume there is no possible way to rewrite it in a cleaner way. Which is completely wrong. The first thing you must learn is of the /x modifier, which allows whitespace embedded in the Regex to be used to separate out different parts of the Regex.

So we can turn this:

/^([+-]?)(\d+\.\d+|\d+\.|\.\d+|\d+)([eE][+-]?\d+)?$/;

into this:

/
  ^
    ([+-]?)        # first, match an optional sign

    (              # then match integers or f.p. mantissas:
         \d+\.\d+  # mantissa of the form a.b
        |\d+\.     # mantissa of the form a.
        |\.\d+     # mantissa of the form .b
        |\d+       # integer of the form a
    )

    ([eE][+-]?\d+)?  # finally, optionally match an exponent
  $
/x;

Which I might add (as far as I know) is not available in any other general purpose Regular Expression librarys, accessible within other languages. So in other words if you are using another language you are stuck with the first form, or you have to write significantly more code to achieve the same ends, which will be error prone. See here for more information.

Actually Perl can be very powerful, imagine running arbitrary code, from within a Regex. Don't worry you're not allowed to use interpolation with this feature, by default. Also this feature, last I heard is experimental, although I would bet it will stay in the language in some form or another. I know for a fact, it is a feature of Perl 6.

$x =~ /(?{print "Hi Mom!";})/;       # matches,
                                     # prints 'Hi Mom!'

Yet another useful feature:

Named back-references

( copied directly from perldoc perlretut )

Perl 5.10 also introduced named capture buffers and named backreferences. To attach a name to a capturing group, you write either (?<name>...) or (?'name'...). The backreference may then be written as \g{name} . It is permissible to attach the same name to more than one group, but then only the leftmost one of the eponymous set can be referenced. Outside of the pattern a named capture buffer is accessible through the %+ hash.

Assuming that we have to match calendar dates which may be given in one of the three formats yyyy-mm-dd, mm/dd/yyyy or dd.mm.yyyy, we can write three suitable patterns where we use 'day', 'month' and 'year' respectively as the names of the buffers capturing the pertaining components of a date. The matching operation combines the three patterns as alternatives:

$fmt1 = '(?<year>\d\d\d\d)-(?<mon>\d\d)-(?<day>\d\d)';
$fmt2 = '(?<mon>\d\d)/(?<day>\d\d)/(?<year>\d\d\d\d)';
$fmt3 = '(?<day>\d\d)\.(?<mon>\d\d)\.(?<year>\d\d\d\d)';

for my $d qw( 2006-10-21 15.01.2007 10/31/2005 ){
    if ( $d =~ m{$fmt1|$fmt2|$fmt3} ){
        print "day=$+{day} month=$+{mon} year=$+{year}\n";
    }
}

prints:

day=21 month=10 year=2006
day=15 month=01 year=2007
day=31 month=10 year=2005

If any of the alternatives matches, the hash %+ is bound to contain the three key-value pairs.

Perl 6

If we take the number matching Regex from above and convert it to a Perl 6 Grammar, it becomes even easier to read.

Perl 6

grammar Date {
  rule year{  \d{4}   }
  rule day{   \d{1,2} }
  rule month{ \d{1,2} }

  rule ymd{ <year>-<month>-<day> }
  rule mdy{ <month>/<day>/<year> }
  rule dmy{ <day>.<month>.<year> }

  rule match{
     <(ymd)>
    |<(mdy)>
    |<(dmy)>
  }
}

Note: I probably have some mistakes in this last bit of code, due to the Perl 6 design changing, and because I also haven't written a lot of Perl 6 code yet. It is also a bit of a contrived example

You would also need to change the for loop also.

for [qw( 2006-10-21 15.01.2007 10/31/2005 )] -> $d {
    if ( $d =~ Date.match ){
        print "day=$<day> month=$<mon> year=$<year>\n";
    }
}

prints:

day=21 month=10 year=2006
day=15 month=01 year=2007
day=31 month=10 year=2005
share|improve this answer
13  
I can do this whole post in one line : I love perl! Perl perl perl! A #1 go team hooyray we're the best! –  Andrew Backer Sep 29 '08 at 7:15
38  
This reads like more like a perl advertisement than an answer. Only the second block of code is relevant to the question. –  moo May 25 '09 at 16:11
4  
Who says I can't advertise Perl, while also answering a question. –  Brad Gilbert May 28 '09 at 22:49
4  
Actually, I wasn't aware of a language that doesn't allow multi-line regexes. I'm pretty sure PHP does, but I think they based on that on Perl regexes, but C# does too, and that's it's own thing. –  Mark Mar 3 '10 at 3:29
2  
Python has supported this, too, since at least Python 2.0 (October 2000). –  Ken Aug 18 '10 at 20:22

I vote for Malbolge

This Malbolge program displays "Hello world!", with full capitalization and exclamation mark at the end.

('&%:9]!~}|z2Vxwv-,POqponl$Hjig%eB@@>}=<M:9wv6WsU2T|nm-,jcL(I&%$#"
`CB]V?Tx<uVtT`Rpo3NlF.Jh++FdbCBA@?]!~|4XzyTT43Qsqq(Lnmkj"Fhg${z@>
share|improve this answer
1  
Seriously. Nothing even comes close. –  Instance Hunter Jul 10 '09 at 1:20
3  
It's cheating if it was designed that way though! That makes it not a "real" language. –  BobMcGee Dec 18 '09 at 1:19

APL wins hands down. It uses a notation that's not even part of a normal character set.

This is the game of Life in one line of APL:

life

(Stolen from http://www.catpad.net/michael/apl/ which is a nice article describing just how that one line of APL works.)

You really can't get more unreadable than that.

share|improve this answer
2  
For anyone who's interested in APL, consider looking at J or K. –  Terhorst Sep 20 '08 at 6:24
2  
Check out the APL keyboard: stackoverflow.com/questions/268751/what-ever-happened-to-apl/… –  lkessler Sep 21 '09 at 21:28
1  
I imagine it's more readable if you actually knew what all those symbols meant...... they have more meaning in math. But still, I completely agree with you :) –  Mark Mar 3 '10 at 3:31
3  
That's like saying "You can't get any more unreadable than algebra" or "You can't get any more unreadable than Japanese". Yes, if you're not familiar with the characters, it looks like gibberish. And English looks like gibberish to someone who only knows Arabic. That just means the character set is unfamiliar, not that the code is unreadable. The language could also be unreadable, but having an unknown character set is orthogonal to this issue. –  Ken Aug 18 '10 at 20:26
3  
For the record, APL is not unreadable. If you were to write a program of any complexity in any language and not use sub functions or modules of any kind, and not use temporay variables to break a problem into manageable pieces, and use only one character variable names, and try to do everthing on one line, and make no effort to make the code readable, then it will not be readable. In fact, well written APL is probably more readable than most other languages. It is much easier to teach a 8 year old how to sum up a list of numbers in APL than in just about any other language. –  PAUL Mansour Dec 30 '10 at 17:09

Ook!

Hello World in Ook!:

Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. 
Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. 
Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook. Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook!

Prints "Type 3 Numbers" and then prints the character corresponding to the input number:

Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! 
Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 

Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook! Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! 
Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! Ook! 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook? Ook. 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook! 
Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook? 
Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook. Ook! Ook. 
Ook! Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook! Ook. Ook! Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook? 
Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook? Ook! Ook! Ook? Ook. Ook. Ook. 
Ook? Ook.
share|improve this answer
1  
If only orang-utans could actually program in it....... I want to see hello world in it. –  Mark Mar 3 '10 at 3:36
2  
@Mark There, I added a hello world program –  annonymously Jan 18 '12 at 1:37

Nobody mentioned FRACTRAN yet.

Program to multiply two numbers:

enter image description here

Yes, it's just these six fractions. You wouldn't even think this is a program. I really recommend reading more about it on the Wikipedia page, it's really interesting.

And there's a Project Euler problem about it.

share|improve this answer

I can't believe MUMPS hasn't been mentioned yet:

%DTC
%DTC ; SF/XAK - DATE/TIME OPERATIONS ;1/16/92  11:36 AM
     ;;19.0;VA FileMan;;Jul 14, 1992
     D    I 'X1!'X2 S X="" Q
     S X=X1 D H S X1=%H,X=X2,X2=%Y+1 D H S X=X1-%H,%Y=%Y+1&X2
     K %H,X1,X2 Q
     ;
C    S X=X1 Q:'X  D H S %H=%H+X2 D YMD S:$P(X1,".",2) X=X_"."_$P(X1,".",2) K X1,X2 Q
S    S %=%#60/100+(%#3600\60)/100+(%\3600)/100 Q
     ;
H    I X<1410000 S %H=0,%Y=-1 Q
     S %Y=$E(X,1,3),%M=$E(X,4,5),%D=$E(X,6,7)
     S %T=$E(X_0,9,10)*60+$E(X_"000",11,12)*60+$E(X_"00000",13,14)
TOH  S %H=%M>2&'(%Y#4)+$P("^31^59^90^120^151^181^212^243^273^304^334","^",%M)+%D
     S %='%M!'%D,%Y=%Y-141,%H=%H+(%Y*365)+(%Y\4)-(%Y>59)+%,%Y=$S(%:-1,1:%H+4#7)
     K %M,%D,% Q
     ;
DOW  D H S Y=%Y K %H,%Y Q
DW   D H S Y=%Y,X=$P("SUN^MON^TUES^WEDNES^THURS^FRI^SATUR","^",Y+1)_"DAY"
     S:Y<0 X="" Q
7    S %=%H>21608+%H-.1,%Y=%\365.25+141,%=%#365.25\1
     S %D=%+306#(%Y#4=0+365)#153#61#31+1,%M=%-%D\29+1
     S X=%Y_"00"+%M_"00"+%D Q
     ;
YX   D YMD S Y=X_% G DD^%DT
YMD  D 7 S %=$P(%H,",",2) D S K %D,%M,%Y Q
T    F %=1:1 S Y=$E(X,%) Q:"+-"[Y  G 1^%DT:$E("TODAY",%)'=Y
     S X=$E(X,%+1,99) G PM:Y="" I +X'=X D DMW S X=%
     G:'X 1^%DT
PM   S @("%H=$H"_Y_X) D TT G 1^%DT:%I(3)'?3N,D^%DT
N    F %=2:1 S Y=$E(X,%) Q:"+-"[Y  G 1^%DT:$E("NOW",%)'=Y
     I Y="" S %H=$H G RT
     S X=$E(X,%+1,99)
     I X?1.N1"H" S X=X*3600,%H=$H,@("X=$P(%H,"","",2)"_Y_X),%=$S(X<0:-1,1:0)+(X\86400),X=X#86400,%H=$P(%H,",")+%_","_X G RT
     D DMW G 1^%DT:'% S @("%H=$H"_Y_%),%H=%H_","_$P($H,",",2)
RT   D TT S %=$P(%H,",",2) D S S %=X_% I %DT'["S" S %=+$E(%,1,12)
     Q:'$D(%(0))  S Y=% G E^%DT
PF   S %H=$H D YMD S %(9)=X,X=%DT["F"*2-1 I @("%I(1)*100+%I(2)"_$E("> <",X+2)_"$E(%(9),4,7)") S %I(3)=%I(3)+X
     Q
TT   D 7 S %I(1)=%M,%I(2)=%D,%I(3)=%Y K %M,%D,%Y Q
NOW  S %H=$H,%H=$S($P(%H,",",2):%H,1:%H-1)
     D TT S %=$P(%H,",",2) D S S %=X_$S(%:%,1:.24) Q
DMW  S %=$S(X?1.N1"D":+X,X?1.N1"W":X*7,X?1.N1"M":X*30,+X=X:X,1:0)
     Q
COMMA     ;
     S %D=X<0 S:%D X=-X S %=$S($D(X2):+X2,1:2),X=$J(X,1,%),%=$L(X)-3-$E(23456789,%),%L=$S($D(X3):X3,1:12)
     F %=%:-3 Q:$E(X,%)=""  S X=$E(X,1,%)_","_$E(X,%+1,99)
     S:$D(X2) X=$E("$",X2["$")_X S X=$J($E("(",%D)_X_$E(" )",%D+1),%L) K %,%D,%L
     Q
HELP S DDH=$S($D(DDH):DDH,1:0),A1="Examples of Valid Dates:" D %
     S A1="  JAN 20 1957 or 20 JAN 57 or 1/20/57"_$S(%DT'["N":" or 012057",1:"") D %
     S A1="  T   (for TODAY),  T+1 (for TOMORROW),  T+2,  T+7,  etc." D %
     S A1="  T-1 (for YESTERDAY),  T-3W (for 3 WEEKS AGO), etc." D %
     S A1="If the year is omitted, the computer "_$S(%DT["P":"assumes a date in the PAST.",1:"uses the CURRENT YEAR.") D %
     I %DT'["X" S A1="You may omit the precise day, as:  JAN, 1957" D %
     I %DT'["T",%DT'["R" G 0
     S A1="If the date is omitted, the current date is assumed." D %
     S A1="Follow the date with a time, such as JAN 20@10, T@10AM, 10:30, etc." D %
     S A1="You may enter a time, such as NOON, MIDNIGHT or NOW." D %
     I %DT["S" S A1="Seconds may be entered as 10:30:30 or 103030AM." D %
     I %DT["R" S A1="Time is REQUIRED in this response." D %
0    Q:'$D(%DT(0))
     S A1=" " D % S A1="Enter a date which is "_$S(%DT(0)["-":"less",1:"greater")_" than or equal to " D %
     S Y=$S(%DT(0)["-":$P(%DT(0),"-",2),1:%DT(0)) D DD^%DT:Y'["NOW"
     I '$D(DDS) W Y,"." K A1 Q
     S DDH(DDH,"T")=DDH(DDH,"T")_Y_"." K A1 Q
     ;
%    I '$D(DDS) W !,"     ",A1 Q
     S DDH=DDH+1,DDH(DDH,"T")="     "_A1 Q

(source)

share|improve this answer

I think that both Intercal and Befunge come close to the top

share|improve this answer

It still depends on whoever is coding. I mean, someone somewhere in the world can still understand LOLCODE or Brainfuck or Haskell or whatever..

I still vote for Brainfuck, though.

share|improve this answer

APL is mostly esoteric, so it doesn't count. LISP is outdated.

So it's C++, I'd say.

Not only does it have a completely incomprehensive standard library, it also requires the developer to take care of memory management. What a waste of time.

share|improve this answer

TECO macros

Datamation, July 1983, pp. 263-265: "It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text. One of the more entertaining games to play with TECO is to type your name in as a command line and try to guess what it does. Just about any possible typing error while talking with TECO will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine."

share|improve this answer

PostScript has a fairly bad reputation for readability.

share|improve this answer

I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that Objective C is not very pretty, especially when you're first trying to pick it up. Eventually it becomes clear but out of all the languages I use on a regular to semi-regular basis, I tend to dread having to wade through Obj-C code the most.

share|improve this answer

i'd say assembly

share|improve this answer

Although I'm C++ programmer, after I once read pro AmigaE article, I realized, that braces are inferior to ENDFOR and alike statements. Compare:

while (foo) {
   bar;
}

with:

WHILE foo
   bar
ENDWHILE

Now some more complex example:

while (foo) {
   for(i=0; i<10; i++) {
      if(i%2) {
        print 1;
      } else {
        print 2;
      }
   }
}

vs.

WHILE (foo) {
   FOR(i=0; i<10; i++) {
      IF(i%2) {
        print 1;
      ELSE
        print 2;
      ENDIF
   ENDFOR
ENDWHILE

Imagine that between FOR, ENDFOR and other keyword pairs there is not one, but 100 lines. Is using ENDFOR-like keywords helpful? IMO it is.

I think that many C++ programmers, including my self, have something like "brace blindness", i.e. they don't read braces, but only the indentation. When there is some error reported, only then brain switches to "ok, lets parse braces now" mode.

Not only C++ suffers from this, but most of mainstream languages, like Java, Perl, PHP and so on.

share|improve this answer

I had to do some Prolog programming in college. Not exactly hard to understand the concept of how the "facts" work together, but to try and actually write some sort of useful program with it I think would be pretty hard.

I think it depends on the level of complexity of the program.

Like a 5 line BASIC hello world program is very simple, but a 500 BASIC program with subroutines and gotos all over the place would be a nightmare. But the same holds true for a C++ program with tons of polymorphism, inheritance, templates and operator overloading.

share|improve this answer

APL is the definitely the answer to this question. it is SO unreadable that, as far as i know, you can't even represent it in HTML .. can anyone figure out:

alt text

??

share|improve this answer
3  
Oh yes you can. &#hex; accesses the unicode character set. –  Joshua May 25 '09 at 15:44

It was said that FORTH was a write-only language. Of course, there's also BF, and APL, so that might not have been unique in that.

share|improve this answer

Applescript (though actually it's more unwritable than unreadable).

TeX is particularly awful, it's a macro language whose macros influence their own lexer at runtime...

And in the realm of esoteric languages, I think Piet is not a bad one.

share|improve this answer

regex by far.

<([A-Z][A-Z0-9]*)\b[^>]*>(.*?)</\1>

what is that?

edit: formatted regex to avoid markup munging

share|improve this answer

A+. http://www.aplusdev.org/

You can see example code (for A+ and many other languages) here: 99 bottles

I use this to write trading systems. The code is utterly mind boggling at times. Definitely a WORN (Write Once Read Never) language. Would be interested to know if anyone else is using A+ or a similar APL derived language.

share|improve this answer

Give a million monkeys a million years on a million compilers and one of them will come up with a useful application in LISP.

About half of the rest will generate compilable Perl. For me, Perl wins hands down because I'm just a coding monkey banging away on my keyboard.

share|improve this answer

Perl is incomprehensible to me because it's a language I haven't learned, like Thai, Greek, or Klingon. Looks like cartoon characters swearing. :)

share|improve this answer

Perl, especially when written by my old boss.

share|improve this answer
3  
@ivan_ivanovich_ivanoff: Yeah, all those hundreds of thousands of Perl, PHP, and Lisp programmers out there who are producing great software, making a living, and enjoying their work sure are "funny". Hard to understand why they would do something so crazy, when they could be coding in something like Java. Maybe it's because they find Java to be a painful, verbose, and ugly langauge consisting of an insane amount of boilerplate and with a frightening monstrosity of a standard library. Or, maybe it's because Perl and Lisp (and for some people, PHP) are just a hell of a lot more fun to use. –  Christopher Cashell Jun 21 '11 at 18:17

Unlambda

Quoting the Unlambda Website:

. . . the language was deliberately built to make programming painful and difficult . . .

share|improve this answer

Lisp is pretty bad. But of the popular ones, I think perl is worst.

share|improve this answer

Even very well-written Scheme code can be extremely unreadable. For example, this snippet from a real-world Scheme application.

 ((n.lisp_token_pos_guess is to)
  ((year))
  ((p.lisp_token_pos_guess is sym)
   ((pp.lisp_token_pos_guess is sym)
    ((cardinal))
    ((lisp_num_digits < 4.6) ((year)) ((digits))))
   ((lisp_num_digits < 4.8)
    ((name < 2880)
     ((name < 1633.2)
      ((name < 1306.4) ((cardinal)) ((year)))
      ((year)))
     ((cardinal)))
    ((cardinal)))))))))

share|improve this answer
2  
After some training, you don't find it that bad. –  Martin Cote Oct 1 '08 at 3:37
36  
I have the source code of Skynet - I'll prove it. Here's the last page of the source: )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))) )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))) )))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))) –  Alister Bulman Apr 10 '09 at 0:17
5  
I've written far more Common Lisp than Scheme, but: is that an example of "very well-written Scheme code"? I'm not seeing it. –  Ken Aug 18 '10 at 20:29
1  
I agree with Ken, I'm also more familiar with CL than Scheme, but a quick search indicates that this snippet of code is actually extracted out of a large list literal from some kind of parsing program. It's not really representative of "Scheme code". filewatcher.com/p/festival-1.95-5.2.1.x86_64.rpm.24346293/usr/… –  spacemanaki Nov 2 '10 at 17:20
3  
The little parens around all the variables make them look like they're shaking. Maybe Scheme is just cold and needs a sweater! –  CodexArcanum Nov 9 '10 at 20:26

I suppose binary code.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.