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We all know that 42 is the answer to everything, but it's news to me that it is a valid credit card number.

Try entering '42' or '42176' into this jQuery Validation testing page and click OK.

What's going on? I thought this was supposed to be the de-facto validation library. Even Microsoft is using it now, but it thinks '42' and '42176' are valid credit card numbers?! It's not even doing a length check. Surely I'm not responsible for adding a length check too? It's called 'creditcard' validator and not 'luhn' validator.

Edit: hitchhiker humor aside - how would I go about patching the validation plugin to check length. is that easy?

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5  
It's the answer to life the universe and everything. Why wouldn't it be a valid credit card number? –  Eli Grey Dec 8 '09 at 2:40
1  
@Elijah: Because the Question isn't "What's a valid credit card number?" –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 8 '09 at 2:46
2  
I mean, the question whose answer is 42. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 8 '09 at 2:57
2  
Do programmers ever make any other literary reference? –  Paul Dec 8 '09 at 3:05
1  
Unintended awesomeness on jQuery's part? –  Brett Allen Dec 8 '09 at 3:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This is probably because this validator merely checks that the number supplied satisfies the LUHN-10 algorithm (which 42 satisfies since 4*2 + 2 = 10 which is 0 modulo 10).

A better validator should maybe check for a minimal number of digits.

I'm not sure this corresponds to the very latest code from jQuery, but I found the snippet associated with credit card validation:

	// http://docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Validation/Methods/creditcard
	// based on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luhn
	creditcard: function(value, element) {
		if ( this.optional(element) )
			return "dependency-mismatch";
		// accept only digits and dashes
		if (/[^0-9-]+/.test(value))
			return false;
		var nCheck = 0,
			nDigit = 0,
			bEven = false;

		value = value.replace(/\D/g, "");

		for (n = value.length - 1; n >= 0; n--) {
			var cDigit = value.charAt(n);
			var nDigit = parseInt(cDigit, 10);
			if (bEven) {
				if ((nDigit *= 2) > 9)
					nDigit -= 9;
			}
			nCheck += nDigit;
			bEven = !bEven;
		}

		return (nCheck % 10) == 0;
	},

... and as you see this merely check that all characters are digits and that LUHN-10 is satisfied, without any attention to a minial length.

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6  
Wow, what a crappy validation routine. –  Ed S. Dec 8 '09 at 2:43
    
@ed unfortunately yes :-/ –  Simon_Weaver Dec 8 '09 at 2:49

You can combine the credit card rule with the minimum and maximum length rules to achieve what you want. That may seem like too much effort -- and I might agree -- though it does give you more control if you only want to accept certain card number lengths.

$('form').validate({
    '#ccNum': {
                   creditcard: true,
                   required: true,
                   minlength: 13,
                   maxlength: 19
              }
});
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thanks! and OF COURSE I only want to accept CC numbers of certain lengths !!! –  Simon_Weaver Jan 6 '10 at 23:18

The length of credit card numbers can vary depending on the issuer (though yes, there's generally a minimum length of ~13 digits). However, since this is client-side validation, the focus is probably more on reducing the chance of a small typo, and less on checking arbitrary data. That should probably be done server-side.

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but the problem is if you've already got it wrong once - as you begin to start typing to correct it it will tell you as youre typing that its correct, and then wrong, and then correct again. all credit cards must be at least 15 characters right - so why isnt it making a check. i have the source i suppose but it just makes me weary of using this library overall. –  Simon_Weaver Dec 8 '09 at 2:37
    
The length must be between 13 and 19 digits, in general. –  dave4420 Dec 8 '09 at 2:39
1  
The 19-digit max is a limitation of ISO 7812. Theoretically a card number might be as few as 6 digits (for the IIN), though in practice 13-digit cards are the shortest that have been commonly issued by the financial industry (and they are no longer in use). –  bobince Dec 8 '09 at 3:15

I have corrected the jQuery validate function to consider credit card length in validation.

I added the following to the credit card validation code-

if (value.length > 19 || value.length<12)
{
    return (false);
}

The complete code for the creditcard validation part is as follows:-

creditcard: function(value, element) {
if ( this.optional(element) )
return "dependency-mismatch";
// accept only digits and dashes
if (/[^0-9-]+/.test(value))
return false;

// Modified part to check minimum and maximum card length
if (value.length > 19 || value.length<12)
{
    return (false);
}

var nCheck = 0,
nDigit = 0,
bEven = false;
value = value.replace(/\D/g, "");

for (n = value.length - 1; n >= 0; n--) {
var cDigit = value.charAt(n);
var nDigit = parseInt(cDigit, 10);
if (bEven) {
if ((nDigit *= 2) > 9)
nDigit -= 9;
}
nCheck += nDigit;
bEven = !bEven;
}

return (nCheck % 10) == 0;
},

I have hard coded the minimum and maximum card lengths as 12 and 19 respectively.

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