Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hopefully I can explain this clearly. If I have a main method with lots of steps that can generate different exceptions, some fatal, some not, do I have to catch the "recoverable" ones separately? It seems like that would result in potentially a lot of try/catch blocks, like so:

public static void main (String[] args) {
    try {
        //...
        for (int i=0;someArray.length;i++) {
            try{
                System.out.println("I = " + i);
                doSometing(i);
            } catch (RecoverableException e) {
                //recover, continue, whatever
                //log warning
                                    //keep 
            }
        }//end for loop

        try {
            doSomethingElse();
        } catch (AnotherRecoverableException e) {
            //not fatal, keep on chugging
        }

        //...

        //do more stuff that can throw unrecoverable exceptions
    } catch (UnrecoverableException e) {
        System.out.println("I can't handle this, it's too much!");
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Is there a better way to do this?

share|improve this question
2  
Depends how you want to handle them. You can have a single catch (Exception) around everything. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 5 '13 at 17:11
    
I wouldn't catch unrecoverable exceptions, I would let the caller handle it. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 5 '13 at 17:12
1  
If your method is littered with disparate try/catch blocks then your method is almost certainly too large/trying to do too many things. –  Dave Newton Sep 5 '13 at 17:13
    
Remember, you can catch exceptions by type. Generally, there's little overlap in the types of exceptions you "tolerate" vs those you consider to be fatal. –  Hot Licks Sep 5 '13 at 17:42
    
@Peter, in this case, this is the calling method (the main method). –  Andrew Sep 5 '13 at 18:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My patterns are to let exceptions propagate when they would represent programming bugs and handle them as closely to the "problem" when you can handle them.

The problem is that many potential Programming bugs throw checked exceptions which is really bad (Checked exceptions are kind of a failed experement, the newer languages have gotten rid of them).

So:

  • Handle checked and unchecked exceptions that you can deal with immediately.
  • If you don't know how to handle a checked exception rethrow it as an unchecked exception.
  • any "top level" loop like in main or a thread should be surrounded by a try/catch/log of "Exception" to ensure that any exception that bubbles up doesn't kill the thread (but log it loudly because it represents an unknown programming bug!)
  • Any critical loop that should continue regardless of exceptions should have a try/catch/log of "Exception" inside the loop construct so it will continue.
  • Catch exception, not throwable at this high level. Throwable includes unrecoverable exceptions that you probably never want to catch.
  • If you really must throw an exception you think you want the caller to catch (try to avoid this--It means you are using Exceptions as code flow!), throw an unchecked exception but document it and have the method "throw" the unchecked exception (it doesn't HAVE to be handled, but this acts as additional documentation/hint).

    Just as a background for why I dislike checked exceptions so--it makes code like this happeen:

    try {
       Thread.sleep(1000);
    } catch(InterruptedException e) {}
    

    This can hide some INCREDABLY annoying to find program-flow related bugs. In this case it simply means you might have some thread-control issues, but in others it can mean your code-flow "Magically" vanishes mid-method with no indication whatsoever (because an exception was picked up by a higher level try/catch).

  • share|improve this answer
        
    IIRC, you can blame a guy named "Goodenough" for checked exceptions. –  Hot Licks Sep 5 '13 at 17:52
        
    Thanks for the explanation, very helpful. –  Andrew Sep 5 '13 at 18:32

    If you are using Java 7 then you can club exceptions in the catch block using pipe as separator. This will reduce your number of catch blocks. But you need to decide how you want to handle them by putting appropriate code in the catch block.

    In Java 7, you can do this:

    try
    {
    ...
    }
    catch(Exception1 | Exception2 | Exception3 e)
    {
      //Handle
    }
    catch(Exception4 | Exception5 | Exception6 e)
    {
       //Handle differently
    }
    
    share|improve this answer
        
    Not sure this is really what I was asking, but maybe I wasn't clear enough. I'm trying to see if I need separate try/catch blocks to ensure that I can catch an exception (non-fatal) within a loop and continue processing, and wondering if I should catch fatal exceptions separately, and once, for the whole method. –  Andrew Sep 5 '13 at 18:38
        
    @Andrew Catching a fatal exception/error may not lead u anywhere. So generally catching error using Throwable is not recommended. Just catch the exceptions, if it is logical to continue otherwise simply throw back the exception. –  Juned Ahsan Sep 6 '13 at 3:54

    You can use. defaultUncaughtExceptionHandler, but it only triggers if the Thread doesn't have a uncaughtExceptionHandler set.

    share|improve this answer

    For java versions other than 7, a cleaner approach is to handle exceptions in called methods. This makes code readable as shown below:

    doSomething(int i){
     //code
    try{
     //code
    }catch(Exception1 e1){
     //handle
    }
    catch(Exception2 e2){
    //handle
    }
    }
    
    doSomethingElse(){
     //code
     try{
      }catch(Exception1 e1){
     //handle
      }
       catch(Exception2 e2){
        //handle
        }
      }
    
     public static void main (String[] args) {
        for (int i=0;someArray.length;i++) {
         doSometing(i);
        }//end for loop
    
        doSomethingElse();
        }
    

    I do not recommend using generic Exception to catch all errors in one block. This makes difficult to know specific exceptions and prevents specific handling of them.

    share|improve this answer
        
    I think this makes sense, except that I'm not sure how I'd handle logging the warnings or whatever, unless the broken out methods are in the same class. –  Andrew Sep 5 '13 at 18:30

    Your Answer

     
    discard

    By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

    Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.