Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The POSIX documentation (IEEE 1003.1, 2013) for the pthread_cond_timedwait function says:

It is important to note that when pthread_cond_wait() and pthread_cond_timedwait() return without error, the associated predicate may still be false. Similarly, when pthread_cond_timedwait() returns with the timeout error, the associated predicate may be true due to an unavoidable race between the expiration of the timeout and the predicate state change.

(emphasis mine)

We all know the story that the predicates controlled by condition variables should be checked in a while loop, and there may be spurious wake ups. But my question is about the unavoidable word -- it's a strong word. Why is such a race not avoidable?

Note that if such a race didn't exist, we could just check if pthread_cond_timedwait timed out; instead of checking the predicate again, and only then handle the timeout condition. (Assuming, of course, that we get signalled only 1) with the mutex held and 2) when the predicate actually changes.)

Wouldn't it suffice to atomically check, with the "user mutex" held, if we got woken by timeout or were signalled?


For instance, let's consider an implementation of condition variables built on top of POSIX ones. (Error handling and initialization is omitted, you can fill in the obvious gaps).

class CV 
{
pthread_mutex_t mtx;
pthread_cond_t cv;
int waiters; // how many threads are sleeping
int wakeups; // how many times this cv got signalled

public:    
CV();
~CV();

// returns false if it timed out, true otherwise
bool wait(Mutex *userMutex, struct timespec *timeout)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);

    waiters++;
    const int oldWakeups = wakeups;

    userMutex->unlock();

    int ret; // 0 on success, non-0 on timeout

    for (;;) {
        ret = pthread_cond_timedwait(&mtx, &cv, timeout);
        if (!(ret == 0 && wakeups == 0))
            break; // not spurious
    }

    if (ret == 0) // not timed out
        wakeups--;

    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);

    userMutex->lock();

    pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);
    waiters--;
    if (ret != 0 && wakeups > oldWakeups) {
        // got a wakeup after a timeout: report the wake instead
        ret = 0;
        wakeups--;    
    }
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);

    return (ret == 0);
}

void wake()
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);
    wakeups = min(wakeups + 1, waiters);
    pthread_cond_signal(&cv);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);
}
};

It is possible to show that

  • if CV::wait reports a timeout, then we did not get signalled and thus the predicate didn't change; and that
  • if the timeout expires but we get signalled before returning to the user code with the user mutex held, then we report the wake.

Does the code above contain some serious mistake? If not, is the standard wrong at saying the race is unavoidable, or must it do some other assumption that I'm missing?

share|improve this question
2  
In truly parallel execution, it is unavoidable that the predicate may change at the very same moment the timeout expires. Isn't that race enough? – pilcrow Sep 6 '13 at 15:47
    
Not quite. Both changing the predicate and returning from the call with timeout will require mutex handling (and signalling). I'm trying to understand why the standard says that the predicate must be checked even in case of timeout (provided that who changes it also signals it...), talking about this unavoidable race. – peppe Sep 6 '13 at 16:35
1  
There could still be same-instant timeout and predicate change — signaling isn't part of the race. Moreover, once the timeout decision has been made, the waiter must get back in line to obtain the mutex once more. A predicate change may happen then, too. – pilcrow Sep 6 '13 at 16:43
    
Which is the weird part. What I'm trying to see, with the snippet below, is that that once you require the user mutex you could also detect if you were signalled, and return with a wake. – peppe Sep 6 '13 at 17:29

First off, note that this has a generally dangerous part:

pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);
// Trouble is here
userMutex->lock();

pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);

At the commented point, anything can happen. You have no locks held. The power of a condition variable is that they are always either holding the lock, or waiting.

Then there is the issue at hand, unavoidable races

if (ret != 0 && wakeups > oldWakeups) {
    // got a wakeup after a timeout: report the wake instead
    ret = 0;
    wakeups--;    
}

There is no guarantee of what order a bunch of pthread_cond_t's waiting will be woken up, which wreaks havoc on your counting

Thread1           Thread2        Thread3
{lock userMtx in calling code}
{lock mtx}
waiters++ (=1)
oldWakeups = 0
{unlock userMtx }
wait {unlock mtx}
                  {lock userMtx in calling code}
                  {lock mtx}
                  signal_all
                  wakeups = 1
                  {unlock mtx}
                  {unlock userMtx in calling code}
timeout(unavoid. racecase) {lock mtx}
{unlock mtx}
                                  {lock userMtx in calling code}
                                  {lock mtx}
                                  waiters++ (=2)
                                  oldWawkupes = 1
                                  {unlock userMtx }
                                  wait {unlock mtx}

                                  timeout {lock mtx}
                                  {unlock mtx}
                                  {lock userMtx}
                                  {lock mtx}
                                  waiters-- (=1)
                                  wakeups-- (=0)*
                                  {unlock mtx}
                                  {unlock userMtx in calling code}
 {lock userMtx}
 {lock mtx}
 waiters--(=0)
 wakeups == oldWakeups (=0)
 {unlock mtx}
 {unlock userMtx in calling code}

At this point, on thread 1, oldWakeups = wakeups, so the check for the unavoidable race case fails to notice the race case, recreating the unavoidable race case. This is caused by thread 3 getting to steal the signal intended for thread1, making thread 3 (a true timeout) look like a signal, and thread1 (a race signal/timeout) look like a timeout

share|improve this answer
1  
1) "The power of a condition variable is that they are always either holding the lock, or waiting." this is not strictly true -- implementations are allowed to fake this atomicity, i.e. unlock the mutex and then go to sleep, provided that any signal sent in that timespan is correctly delivered. 2) The counter example doesn't work: thread1 must already be in wait and have released the internal "mtx" lock for thread2 to proceed to increment waiters. – peppe Sep 6 '13 at 7:35
    
Thanks, I have modified the example to have thread2 run at a valid time, still generating the same race case – Cort Ammon Sep 6 '13 at 15:14
    
Uhm... sorry, where does oldWakeups = 1 come from? It should still be 0. – peppe Sep 6 '13 at 15:27
    
Corrected. This is what happens when you try to answer multithreaded questions before bed! – Cort Ammon Sep 6 '13 at 15:36
    
I will add a note that, when thread3 is waiting, life would be great if thread1 could run, acquire the locks, and avoid the race. No mutexes are stopping it. However, when dealing with things like race cases and spurious behavior, one has to assume the most pessimum scheduler. – Cort Ammon Sep 6 '13 at 15:39

Your implementation does not prevent the possibility of a spurious TIMEOUT when a thread is signaled. You immediately decrement wakeups on successful cond_wait and you decrement wakeups on a failed cond_wait if it looks like there was a signal intended for you (wakeup has a higher number). However, the math you use to ensure a signal is meant for someone does not actually do that.

The problem is in the race case where you unlock all mutexes after waiting

if (ret == 0)
    wakeups--;

pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);

// no locks held.  If interrupted, ANYTHING can happen

userMutex->lock();

pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);

Now to define success and failure, I have to declare that your cond_wait spans from the initial pthread_mutex_lock to the final pthread_mutex_unlock. To declare that you have no race case where a signal can look like a timeout, that has to be the case. If you manage to prevent the spurrious timeout on pthread_cond_wait, only to introduce another spurrious timeout of your own, no problem is solved

So all that has to be proven is that there is a case where a thread is signaled while running, but the wakeups checks fail. It turns out the easiest way to do this is to trick wakeups to be -1 by having one thread steal another's wakeup. 3 threads will wait, and one will signal twice. The trick to doing is abusing the min() in Wake. It also relies on a race case between two cond_waits ending at once. One of them has to acquire mtx, and it is undefined which one succeeds. In this case, I assume the worst (as you always can with race case proofs)

initial state {
   waiters = 0
   wakeups = 0
}

Thread 1     Thread 2    Thread 3      Thread 4
1: {acquire userMutex}
1: wait(...) {
1:   {acquire mtx}
1:   {release userMutex}
1:   waiters++; // = 1
1:   oldWakeups = wakeups; // 0
1:   pthread_cond_wait // releases mtx
1:   ptrheads TIMES OUT // acquires mtx
1:   sees timeout
1:   {release mtx}
1:   // world's worst context switch occurs here
             2: {acquire userMutex}
             2: wait(...) {
             2:   {acquire mtx}
             2:   {release userMutex}
             2:   waiters++; // = 2
             2:   oldWakeups = wakeups; // = 0
             2:   pthread_cond_wait // releases mtx
                         3:  {acquires userMutex}
                         3:  wait(...) {
                         3:    {acquire mtx}
                         3:    {release userMutex}
                         3:    waiters++; // = 3
                         3:    oldWakeups = wakeups; // = 0
                         3:    pthread_cond_wait // releases mtx
                                       4:  {acquire userMtx}
                                       4:  wake() {
                                       4:    {acquire mtx}
                                       4:    wakeups = min(wakeups + 1, waiters);
                                       4:    //      = min(0 + 1, 3) = 1
                                       4:    pthread_cond_signal
                                       4:    {release mtx}
                                       4:  }
                                       4:  {release userMtx}
 RACE:       2: TIMEOUT  3: SIGNALED
 RACE:       both of these threads need to acquire mtx
             2:   {acquires mtx}
             2:   sees that it times out
             2:   if (timeout && (wakeups > oldWakeups)) { // (1 > 0)
             2:     // thinks the wakeup was for this thread
             2:     waiters--; // = 2
             2:     wakeups--; // = 0
             2:   }
             2:   {releases mtx}
             2:   returns SIGNALED;
             2: }
             2: {releases userMtx}
                         3:    {acquires mtx}
                         3:    sees that it was signaled
                         3:    wakeups--; // = -1 ... UH O!
                         3:    waiters--; // = 1
                         3:    {releases mtx}
                         3:    returns SIGNALED;
                         3:  }
                         3:  {releases userMtx}

 --- some synchronization which makes it clear that both thread 2 ---
 --- and thread 3 were signaled occurs here.  Thread 1 is still   ---
 --- technically waiting in limbo.  User decides to wake it up.   ---

                                       4:  {acquire userMtx}
                                       4:  wake() {
                                       4:    {acquire mtx}
                                       4:    wakeups = min(wakeups + 1, waiters);
                                       4:    //      = min(-1 + 1, 1) = 0  !!!
                                       4:    pthread_cond_signal
                                       4:    {release mtx}
                                       4:  }
                                       4:  {release userMtx}
1:   {acquire userMtx}
1:   {acquire mtx}
1:   waiters--; // = 0
1:   if (timeout && (wakeups > oldWakeups)) {..}  (0 > 0)
1:   // no signal detected
1:   {release mtx}
1:   return TIMEOUT;
1: }
1: {release userMtx}

Thanks to a funny race case managing to get wakeups to -1, the trick to avoid missing signals doesn't work. pthreads_cond_signal is allowed to wake multiple threads, so simultaniously waking threads 2 and 3 is legitimate. However, the second signal clearly only has one thread to signal, so thread1 must have been signaled. However, we returned TIMEOUT, yielding the infamous unavoidable race case.

As far as I can tell, the harder you try to lock down those wakeups to the correct thread, the more ways dropping all mutexes while not technically waiting on any condition variable is more deadly.

share|improve this answer
    
Note: I think that these issues can be sidestepped by using a linked list instead of a counter, so that you choose which thread gets signaled, and avoid signalling timedout threads. However, this requires you to have control over the scheduler: you have to make sure your OS signal actually goes to the right thread. POSIX declares that one of their goals is not to interfere with OS schedulers, so they can't use that as an implementation. – Cort Ammon Sep 7 '13 at 20:23
    
No, I'm not trying in any way to assume anything about the pthread behaviour or the OS scheduler. It's ok to assume the worst there. But watch out (let's go in chat again? :-), now there's another incorrect assumption: "3: wakeups--; // = -1 ... UH O!" can't happen! wakeups-- is inside "timedout && wakeups > oldwakeups". for thread 3: yes, it timed out, but wakeups == oldwakeups == 0. – peppe Sep 7 '13 at 22:31

Just for reference, an interesting entry on the same subject:

http://woboq.com/blog/qwaitcondition-solving-unavoidable-race.html

The only way to solve this problem would be if we could order the thread by the time they started to wait.

Inspired by the bitcoin's blockchain, I created a linked list of nodes on the thread's stack that represent the order. When a thread is starting to wait, it adds itself at the end of the double linked list. When a thread is waking other thread, it marks the last node of the linked list. (by incrementing a woken counter inside the node). When a thread is timing out, it checks if it was marked, or any other thread after him in the linked list. We only solve the race in that case, otherwise we consider it is a timeout.

https://codereview.qt-project.org/#/c/66810/

This patch adds quite a bit of code to add and remove nodes in the linked list, and also to go over the list to check if we were indeed woken up. The linked list is bound by the number of waiting thread. I was expecting that this linked list handling would be negligible compared to the other cost of QWaitCondition

However, the results of the QWaitCondition benchmark show that, with 10 threads and high contention, we have a ~10% penalty. With 5 threads there is ~5% penalty.

Is it worth it to pay this penalty to solve the race? So far, we decided not to merge the patch and keep the race.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.