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I have a key-value dataframe:

pd.DataFrame(columns=['X','Y','val'],data= [['a','z',5],['b','g',3],['b','y',6],['e','r',9]])
>    X Y val
   0 a z   5
   1 b g   3
   2 b y   6
   3 e r   9

Which I'd like to convert into a denser dataframe:

     X z g y r
   0 a 5 0 0 0
   1 b 0 3 6 0
   2 e 0 0 0 9

Before I resort to a pure-python I was wondering if there was a simple way to do this with pandas.

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It's easy to pivot to get this without the empty line of b 0 0 0 0; is that important? –  DSM Sep 5 '13 at 17:30
    
Should the 6 be on row 2 rather than row 1? –  Andy Hayden Sep 5 '13 at 17:59
    
fixed row 2, it was a typo! thanks for pointing this out! –  stites Sep 5 '13 at 18:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use get_dummies:

In [11]: dummies = pd.get_dummies(df['Y'])

In [12]: dummies
Out[12]: 
   g  r  y  z
0  0  0  0  1
1  1  0  0  0
2  0  0  1  0
3  0  1  0  0

and then multiply by the val column:

In [13]: res = dummies.mul(df['val'], axis=0)

In [14]: res
Out[14]: 
   g  r  y  z
0  0  0  0  5
1  3  0  0  0
2  0  0  6  0
3  0  9  0  0

To fix the index, you could just add the X as this index, you could first apply set_index:

In [21]: df1 = df.set_index('X', append=True)

In [22]: df1
Out[22]: 
     Y  val
  X        
0 a  z    5
1 b  g    3
2 b  y    6
3 e  r    9

In [23]: dummies = pd.get_dummies(df['Y'])

In [24]: dummies.mul(df['val'], axis=0)
Out[24]: 
     g  r  y  z
  X            
0 a  0  0  0  5
1 b  3  0  0  0
2 b  0  0  6  0
3 e  0  9  0  0

If you wanted to do this pivot (you can also use pivot_table):

In [31]: df.pivot('X', 'Y').fillna(0)
Out[31]: 
   val         
Y    g  r  y  z
X              
a    0  0  0  5
b    3  0  6  0
e    0  9  0  0

Perhaps you want to reset_index, to make X a column (I'm not sure whether than makes sense):

In [32]: df.pivot('X', 'Y').fillna(0).reset_index()
Out[32]: 
   X  val         
Y       g  r  y  z
0  a    0  0  0  5
1  b    3  0  6  0
2  e    0  9  0  0

For completeness, the pivot_table:

In [33]: df.pivot_table('val', 'X', 'Y', fill_value=0)
Out[33]: 
Y  g  r  y  z
X            
a  0  0  0  5
b  3  0  6  0
e  0  9  0  0

In [34]: df.pivot_table('val', 'X', 'Y', fill_value=0).reset_index()
Out[34]: 
Y  X  g  r  y  z
0  a  0  0  0  5
1  b  3  0  6  0
2  e  0  9  0  0

Note: the column name are named Y, after reseting the index, not sure if this makes sense (and easy to rectify via res.columns.name = None).

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1  
Hmm. Using get_dummies preserves all the rows the OP wants, but doesn't put the 3 and 6 in the same row; .pivot("X", "Y").fillna(0) puts the 3 and 6 in the same row but loses the 0 row. I'm not sure which is closer to what the OP is after. –  DSM Sep 5 '13 at 17:53
    
Hmmm, that positioning looks wrong. The thing I'm missing atm is the df['X'] col being part of the index –  Andy Hayden Sep 5 '13 at 17:55
    
Yeah, I guess it could be an error on the OP's part. +1 anyway. :^) –  DSM Sep 5 '13 at 17:59
    
:) I see what you're saying. Yeah, depends what they are after. If it's the thing OP wrote they should throw away the first index (as that doesn't make much sense)... –  Andy Hayden Sep 5 '13 at 18:00
    
Yeah sorry about not being clear - the pivot tables where all I was looking for... forgot about those. However after testing out get_dummies this works out better for what I need to work with. Thank you! –  stites Sep 5 '13 at 18:27

If you want something that feels more direct. Something akin to DataFrame.lookup but for np.put might make sense.

def lookup_index(self, row_labels, col_labels):
    values = self.values
    ridx = self.index.get_indexer(row_labels)
    cidx = self.columns.get_indexer(col_labels)
    if (ridx == -1).any():
        raise ValueError('One or more row labels was not found')
    if (cidx == -1).any():
        raise ValueError('One or more column labels was not found')
    flat_index = ridx * len(self.columns) + cidx
    return flat_index

flat_index = lookup_index(df, vals.X, vals.Y)
np.put(df.values, flat_index, vals.val.values)

This assumes that df has the appropriate columns and index to hold the X/Y values. Here's an ipython notebook http://nbviewer.ipython.org/6454120

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