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Im very new to c++ and trying to take my first steps. In my problem I need to read 3 integers and do something with it. So, to take this integers I wrote:

int a, b, n;
scanf("%i%i\n", &a, &b);
scanf("%i", &n);

and also I tried:

scanf("%i%i", &a, &b);
scanf("%i", &n);

but he always gives me some random large integer for n. input:

7 13
1

ty

if I write

freopen("input.txt", "r", stdin);
freopen("output.txt", "w", stdout);

int a, b, n;
cin >> a >> b;
cin >> n;
printf("%i", n);
return 0;

It doesnt work. As same as

freopen("input.txt", "r", stdin);
freopen("output.txt", "w", stdout);

int a, b, n;
scanf("%i%i", &a, &b);
scanf("%i", &n);    
printf("%i", n);
return 0;
share|improve this question
    
Think %d for digit or decimal. –  0x499602D2 Sep 5 '13 at 17:30
    
@0x499602D2 That's misleading and implies that %d will consume just 4 if the input were "42". %d means decimal (base-10). –  jamesdlin Sep 5 '13 at 17:32
1  
Any reason for not using <iostream>? Then you could easily std::cin >> a >> b >> n; –  Max Feldkamp Sep 5 '13 at 17:33
    
Your code is actually working for me. –  Nemanja Boric Sep 5 '13 at 17:34
1  
Hint: always check return value of scanf. Also, try to initialize variables when defining them, to avoid accidentally using them uninitialized (especially when learning and unsure of what some code actually does). –  hyde Sep 5 '13 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

That's not the way one inputs integers in C++. Try:

std::cin >> a >> b >> c;

But if you want two on the first line, and the third on a separate line, you might want to read line by line (using std::getline):

std::string line;
std::getline( std::cin, line );
std::istringstream l1( line );
l1 >> a >> b >> std::ws;
if ( !l1 || l1.get() != EOF ) {
    //  The line didn't contain two numbers...
}
std::getline( std::cin, line );
std::istringstream l2( line );
l2 >> n >> std::ws;
if ( !l2 || l1.get() != EOF ) {
    //  The second line didn't contain one number...
}

This will allow much better error detection and recovery (assuming the input format is line oriented).

You should probably forget about scanf. It's very hard to use correctly, and not very flexible.

share|improve this answer

If you are using C++, is there a reason you are not using streams?

std::cin >> a >> b;
std::cin >> n;

To read from a file, you will use an std::ifstream.

std::ifstream file( "filename.txt" );
if( file.is_open() )
{
    file >> a >> b >> n;
    file.close();
}

cppreference.com is a good reference: ifstream

share|improve this answer
    
I need to get an input from file –  Dima Sep 5 '13 at 17:35
    
@Dima So you an std::ifstream. Anything you can to with std::cin, you can do with any std::istream. –  James Kanze Sep 5 '13 at 17:36
    
@Dima If you're getting input from a file, then why are you using scanf at all instead of fscanf? (Both are pretty notoriously hard to use, however. c-faq.com/stdio/scanfprobs.html) –  jamesdlin Sep 5 '13 at 18:07

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