Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, I know this is going to sound a little extreme but I'm trying to make a point:

OK. so my code doesn't care what kind of exception is being thrown, 99.9% of the time if an exception is being thrown it handles it the same no matter what.

Now, Why should i even bother throwing \ creating new exception in my code? apparently all the libraries i use throw them already and the are very informative as well.

a null object passed for my method? who cares, a null pointer exception will be thrown automatically for me.

Can you make a good argument why should i create new exceptions and throw them?

EDIT what i mean:

why bother with this:

public myMethod() {

try { 
    doStuff1();
}
catch(Exception e) {
throw new Exception("Error in doStuff1");
}
try { 
    doStuff2();
}
catch(Exception e) {
throw new Exception("Error in doStuff2");
}

when i can use this:

public myMethod() {

doStuff1();
doStuff2();

}
share|improve this question
1  
Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. –  hexafraction Sep 5 '13 at 19:10
3  
Do you mean declare new exception classes, or new exception instances? Your question is unclear at the moment. It would be useful if you'd provide concrete examples. –  Jon Skeet Sep 5 '13 at 19:11
1  
As @hexafraction suggests, this is a fairly subjective question and there will be many different opinions revolving around what context it is in. The level at which you program is currently undefined to the users reading your question so we don't know if you have programmed anything that actually requires proper exception handling. The notion you are suggesting about using libraries might also suggest that you have never created your own library which leads you to assume that you believe exception handling is pointless. –  Josh M Sep 5 '13 at 19:16
    
Josh, you pretty much nailed it on the head, is there any way I can understand the necessity of exceptions (without creating a library) :) –  Urbanleg Sep 5 '13 at 19:18
    
Throwing exceptions might not be needed when you are using a library written by someone else (though you need to catch those thrown by the library methods). But if you are writing a library yourself, which others are going to use, you ought to warn them that a method can throw certain exceptions which the users need to catch. –  akaHuman Sep 5 '13 at 19:18

4 Answers 4

Your client wants detailed error reporting. What went wrong, and where did it go wrong.

They don't have a clue what a null pointer exception is. And even then, that in itself is not particularly helpful without the stack trace. So a null pointer gets passed into your RetrieveReportX method? Check if it's null and throw a ReportXNoIdentifierException rather than letting it auto-throw a null pointer exception. Then you'll have a error handler somewhere that, based on these custom exceptions, can report exactly what went wrong in what (human) process, and your client is happy because rather than NullPointerException at [stacktrace], they can see "An identifier was not supplied when attempting to retrieve report X."

share|improve this answer

why should i create new exceptions and throw them?

In some cases it is common and good practice to throw Exception deliberately.
Take

IllegalArgumentException

If your method only accepts arguments within a particular range, e.g. only positive numbers, then you should check for invalid parameters and throw an IllegalArgumentException.

For example:

public int calculateFactorial(int n) {
  if (n < 0)
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("n must be positive");
  if (n >= 60)
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("n must be < 60");
  ...
}  
public void findFactorial(int n)
{
     try{
          calculateFactorial(n)       
      }catch(IllegalArgumentException ie){
         System.out.println(ie.getMessage());
       }
}
share|improve this answer

From Java tutorials - Advantages of Exceptions

  1. Advantage 1: Separating Error-Handling Code from "Regular" Code
  2. Advantage 2: Propagating Errors Up the Call Stack
  3. Advantage 3: Grouping and Differentiating Error Types

Answer

Exception handlers that are too general can make code more error-prone by catching and handling exceptions that weren't anticipated by the programmer and for which the handler was not intended.

As noted, you can create groups of exceptions and handle exceptions in a general fashion, or you can use the specific exception type to differentiate exceptions and handle exceptions in an exact fashion.

share|improve this answer

A lot of the time you don't need to create your own exceptions, you can happily let the libraries or frameworks you're using handle it. Especially now that checked exceptions are less prevalent, and it's out of fashion to create new exceptions for every layer of your application, the occasions for creating custom exceptions are happily reduced.

In most cases where I create a new exception it's to add information or categorize things. You see that in how Spring creates its own hierarchy for data access exceptions, figuring out which SQLExceptions mean what based on error code and vendor, and throwing a new more meaningful exception with the original exception nested inside it. If I create a library that can throw different things I may want to create a custom exception that those exceptions can be nested inside of, so those exceptions can be implementation details. But it's not something you have to do a lot.

When you do create a custom Exception any originating exception should be nested inside it (passing it in to the constructor or passing it to setCause). The example code in your question discards the stacktrace; losing the original exception makes it hard to figure out what went wrong. Also the new exception should be a more meaningful type than just Exception.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.