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Gfortran has the handy -ffpe-trap compiler option, but no similar option is available for gcc. I am vaguely aware that they handle exceptions differently, but not enough to know why one can die from FPEs just by enabling a compiler flag, but the other requires including extra code to turn exceptions on.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by lurker, Kerrek SB, devnull, Pascal Cuoq, uthark Sep 6 '13 at 5:09

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Note in Fortran 2003 one can do a lot off stuff similar as in C with the IEEE exceptions and rounding modes. Not supported by gfortran yet though. If the compiler flag was used to trap the exception it would probably interfere with such a code. –  Vladimir F Sep 6 '13 at 7:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sorry for the wall of text; the real answer is at the bottom.

Floating point exceptions are controlled by library code in C99, not by compiler flags. Here's an example:

#include <fenv.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define PRINTEXC(ex, val) printf(#ex ": %s\n", (val & ex) ? "set" : "unset");

double foo(double a, double b) { return sin(a) / b; }

int main()
{
    int e;
    double x;

    feclearexcept(FE_ALL_EXCEPT);

    x = foo(1.2, 3.1);

    e = fetestexcept(FE_ALL_EXCEPT);
    PRINTEXC(FE_DIVBYZERO, e);
    PRINTEXC(FE_INEXACT, e);
    PRINTEXC(FE_INVALID, e);
    PRINTEXC(FE_OVERFLOW, e);
    PRINTEXC(FE_UNDERFLOW, e);

    putchar('\n');

    feclearexcept(FE_ALL_EXCEPT);

    x += foo(1.2, 0.0);

    e = fetestexcept(FE_ALL_EXCEPT);
    PRINTEXC(FE_DIVBYZERO, e);
    PRINTEXC(FE_INEXACT, e);
    PRINTEXC(FE_INVALID, e);
    PRINTEXC(FE_OVERFLOW, e);
    PRINTEXC(FE_UNDERFLOW, e);
    return lrint(x);
}

Output:

FE_DIVBYZERO: unset
FE_INEXACT: set
FE_INVALID: unset
FE_OVERFLOW: unset
FE_UNDERFLOW: unset

FE_DIVBYZERO: set
FE_INEXACT: set
FE_INVALID: unset
FE_OVERFLOW: unset
FE_UNDERFLOW: unset

Update: With GNU GCC, you may be able to alternatively cause floating point exceptions to trap and send a signal:

#pragma STDC FENV_ACCESS on

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <fenv.h>

int main()
{
#ifdef FE_NOMASK_ENV
    fesetenv(FE_NOMASK_ENV);
#endif

    // ...
}

However, it's not entirely clear what you should do when you receive a SIGFPE, since you can't undo the faulty instruction. (And see @EricPostpischil's comments about the pragma; thanks!)

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I don't think that this answers the OP's question in any way. The OP is asking why gfortran has a flag for FPE and gcc does not, not how does one flag a FPE in C. –  Kyle Kanos Sep 5 '13 at 20:01
    
@KyleKanos: You're right. I wasn't entirely sure what I was looking for, but now I found it. Updated. –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '13 at 20:07
1  
Code that accesses the floating-point environment or runs under non-default floating-point control modes must inform the implementation by using #pragma STDC FENV_ACCESS on. Otherwise, the behavior is undefined by the C standard. –  Eric Postpischil Sep 5 '13 at 20:55
    
@EricPostpischil: Thanks! Is that requirement itself part of the standard? –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '13 at 21:35
1  
@KerrekSB: C 2011 (N1570) 7.6.1, and it was in C 1999 too. Actually, it is too strong to say the behavior is undefined if the pragma is missing. The default FENV_ACCESS state is implementation-defined. If the implementation defines it to be “off” and the pragma is missing, then behavior is undefined by the standard. If I recall correctly, GCC did not support the pragma for a while. –  Eric Postpischil Sep 5 '13 at 21:44

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