Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please help me understand if the following is possible:

var regexMatch = Regex.Match(inputString, "(\S*\d+\S*|\d)+");

if (regexMatch.Value == String.Empty)
{
    return null;
}
else
{
    var trimmedString = regexMatch.Value.Trim();

    if(trimmmedString != regexMatch.Value)
    {
        //Is there any value for inputString that makes this reachable?
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
What are you trying to achieve? –  Mark Walsh Sep 5 '13 at 19:57
3  
If there is a way to reach that line, then I've isolated a bug. If not, I'm barking up the wrong tree. –  User Sep 5 '13 at 20:02
3  
I think this is a fair question. It's asking if .Trim() removes the same whitespace that a regex containing \S would match. –  Tim Medora Sep 5 '13 at 20:07
2  
FWIW, the implementation of Trim() looks like this (sorry for format, don't want to post this as an answer): public static bool IsWhiteSpace(char c) { if (char.IsLatin1(c)) { return char.IsWhiteSpaceLatin1(c); } return CharUnicodeInfo.IsWhiteSpace(c); } –  Tim Medora Sep 5 '13 at 20:09
1  
@TimMedora only for 4.0 and newer, See the "Notes To Callers" here –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 5 '13 at 20:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Starting with .NET 4.0, Trim uses Char.IsWhiteSpace method to decide what to trim; documentation lists all characters that would be trimmed. Since the documentation for \S does not say that it is using the same list of characters, it is a fair question to ask if there's a mismatch.

One way to find out is an exhaustive search:

var ws = new Regex("\\S");
for (char c = '\0'; c != 0xffff; c++) {
    if (char.IsWhiteSpace(c)) {
        var m = ws.Match("" + c);
        if (m.Value.Length != 0) {
            Console.Error.WriteLine("Found a mismatch: {0}", (int)c);
        }
    }
}

Running this code produces no result: none of the 26 characters that char.IsWhitespace considers whitespace is matched by the \S of the regex. Therefore I must conclude that the code protected by the trimmmedString != regexMatch.Value condition is unreachable.

As a side note, regexMatch.Value can never be null: according to the documentation,

If a call to the Regex.Match or Match.NextMatch method fails to find a match, the value of the returned Match.Value property is String.Empty.

You can remove the first if, or replace it with comparison to String.Empty.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you running on .NET 3.5 or 4.0+, Trim does not use Char.IsWhiteSpace if you are using 3.5 and below, see the "Notes To Callers" here –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 5 '13 at 20:18
    
This looks like an authoritative answer compared to mine. I have one question though: How do you obtain the source code of a C# function like Trim in this case ? Thanx –  Sniffer Sep 5 '13 at 20:19
1  
@Sniffer by either getting the source code from Microsoft or using a decomplier like ILSpy and dotPeek –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 5 '13 at 20:21
    
I'm running on 4.0. I edited the OP to properly escape non-matches, I only included that statement to illustrate that I don't care about non-matches. –  User Sep 5 '13 at 20:23
1  
@Sniffer I did not look at the source code -- the info about the inner workings of the Trim() function comes straight from the documentation of the method (see the note to callers section). –  dasblinkenlight Sep 5 '13 at 20:25

Your code is a bit questionable, but I will answer the question of whether String.Trim() is equivalent to using \s to remove leading and trailing white-spaces or not.

They are equivalent from .NET Framework 4.0

  • From .NET 4.0, String.Trim() will remove leading and trailing characters which make Char.IsWhitespace() returns true.

    Char.IsWhitespace() returns true for characters in categories Zl, Zp, Zs, as per description in the documentation, and also for \t, \n, \v, \f, \r, \x85.

    Note that there seems to be some discrepancies. According to fileformat.info, U+00A0 NO-BREAK SPACE belongs to Zs category, but MSDN doesn't put it in the list of Space Separator in Char.IsWhitespace()'s documentation. Testing reveals that \s matches U+00A0, which means U+00A0 is one of the characters in \p{Z} category.

  • According to the page Character Classes in Regular Expression, \s is equivalent to [\f\n\r\t\v\x85\p{Z}]. The Z category currently consists of 3 sub-categories: Zs, Zl, Zp.

They are not equivalent prior to .NET 4.0

According to String.Trim() documentation:

Because of this change, the Trim method in the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 and earlier versions removes two characters, ZERO WIDTH SPACE (U+200B) and ZERO WIDTH NO-BREAK SPACE (U+FEFF), that the Trim method in the .NET Framework 4 and later versions does not remove.

In addition, the Trim method in the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 and earlier versions does not trim three Unicode white-space characters: MONGOLIAN VOWEL SEPARATOR (U+180E), NARROW NO-BREAK SPACE (U+202F), and MEDIUM MATHEMATICAL SPACE (U+205F).

To put it simply, String.Trim() considers a different set of characters for removal in .NET versions prior to 4.0.

The specification for \s in regular expression stays the same from .NET 1.1.

share|improve this answer
    
The code wasn't originally mine, I just wanted to isolate the part I thought might be causing a bug. –  User Sep 5 '13 at 20:27

dasblinkenlight answer is wrong, the behavior changed from .NET 3.5 to .NET 4.0., see the "Notes to Callers" here. Changing his code slightly so it actually uses Trim() the test finds no matches for .NET 4.0 but finds two matches for .NET 3.5

public class Program
{

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var ws = new Regex("\\S");
        for (char c = '\0'; c != 0xffff; c++)
        {
            if (new String(c, 1).Trim().Length == 0)
            {
                var m = ws.Match("" + c);
                if (m.Value.Length != 0)
                {
                    Console.Error.WriteLine("Found a mismatch: {0}", (int)c);
                }
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine("done");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

}

//Output running in .NET 3.5:
//Found a mismatch: 8203
//Found a mismatch: 65279
//done


//Output running in .NET 4.0:
//done
share|improve this answer
1  
That's nice to know! OP did indicate that he's running on .NET 4.0, though. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 5 '13 at 20:31
1  
I did eventually indicate that I am running 4.0, but I do appreciate the extra effort to be exhaustive on behalf of others who might be stuck with an older version. –  User Sep 5 '13 at 20:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.