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I have a data set consisting of multiple tuples per time stamp - each of these has a count. There could be different tuples present at each time stamp. I would like to group these together in 5 minute bins and add the counts for each unique tuple. Is there a nice clean way to do this using Pandas group-by ?

They have the form: ((u'67.163.47.231', u'8.27.82.254', 50186, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 2)

This is currently a list, with a 6-tuple (last entry is time-stamp), and then count.

There will be a collection of 5-tuples for every time stamp:

(5-tuple), t-time-stamp, count, for example (for just one time stamp)

[((u'71.57.43.240', u'8.27.82.254', 33108, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 1),
 ((u'67.163.47.231', u'8.27.82.254', 50186, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 2),
 ((u'8.27.82.254', u'98.206.29.242', 25159, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 1),
 ((u'71.179.102.253', u'8.27.82.254', 50958, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 1)]

In [220]: df = DataFrame ( { 'key1' : [ (u'71.57.43.240', u'8.27.82.254', 33108, 80, 6), (u'67.163.47.231', u'8.27.82.254', 50186, 80, 6) ], 'data1' : np.array((1,2)), 'data2': np.array((1377565195000,1377565195000))})

In [226]: df
Out[226]: 
   data1          data2                                        key1
0      1  1377565195000   (71.57.43.240, 8.27.82.254, 33108, 80, 6)
1      2  1377565195000  (67.163.47.231, 8.27.82.254, 50186, 80, 6)

or converted:

In [231]: df = DataFrame ( { 'key1' : [ (u'71.57.43.240', u'8.27.82.254', 33108, 80, 6), (u'67.163.47.231', u'8.27.82.254', 50186, 80, 6) ], 'data1' : np.array((1,2)), 
   .....: 'data2': np.array(( datetime.utcfromtimestamp(1377565195),datetime.utcfromtimestamp(1377565195) )) })

In [232]: df
Out[232]: 
   data1               data2                                        key1
0      1 2013-08-27 00:59:55   (71.57.43.240, 8.27.82.254, 33108, 80, 6)
1      2 2013-08-27 00:59:55  (67.163.47.231, 8.27.82.254, 50186, 80, 6)


Here's a simpler example:

time         count       city
00:00:00       1         Montreal
00:00:00       2         New York
00:00:00       1         Chicago
00:01:00       2         Montreal
00:01:00       3         New York

after bin-ing

time         count       city
00:05:00       3         Montreal
00:05:00       5         New York
00:05:00       1         Chicago

Here's what seems to work well:

times = [ parse('00:00:00'), parse('00:00:00'), parse('00:00:00'), parse('00:01:00'), parse('00:01:00'),
parse('00:02:00'), parse('00:02:00'), parse('00:03:00'), parse('00:04:00'), parse('00:05:00'),
parse('00:05:00'), parse('00:06:00'), parse('00:06:00') ]
cities = [ 'Montreal', 'New York', 'Chicago', 'Montreal', 'New York', 
'New York', 'Chicago', 'Montreal', 'Montreal', 'New York', 'Chicago', 'Montreal', 'Chicago']
counts = [ 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1]
frame = DataFrame( { 'city': cities, 'time': times, 'count': counts } )

In [150]: frame
Out[150]: 
        city  count                time
0   Montreal      1 2013-09-07 00:00:00
1   New York      2 2013-09-07 00:00:00
2    Chicago      1 2013-09-07 00:00:00
3   Montreal      2 2013-09-07 00:01:00
4   New York      3 2013-09-07 00:01:00
5   New York      1 2013-09-07 00:02:00
6    Chicago      1 2013-09-07 00:02:00
7   Montreal      1 2013-09-07 00:03:00
8   Montreal      2 2013-09-07 00:04:00
9   New York      2 2013-09-07 00:05:00
10   Chicago      2 2013-09-07 00:05:00
11  Montreal      1 2013-09-07 00:06:00
12   Chicago      1 2013-09-07 00:06:00

frame['time_5min'] = frame['time'].map(lambda x: pd.DataFrame([0],index=pd.DatetimeIndex([x])).resample('5min').index[0])

In [152]: frame
Out[152]: 
        city  count                time           time_5min
0   Montreal      1 2013-09-07 00:00:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
1   New York      2 2013-09-07 00:00:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
2    Chicago      1 2013-09-07 00:00:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
3   Montreal      2 2013-09-07 00:01:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
4   New York      3 2013-09-07 00:01:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
5   New York      1 2013-09-07 00:02:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
6    Chicago      1 2013-09-07 00:02:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
7   Montreal      1 2013-09-07 00:03:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
8   Montreal      2 2013-09-07 00:04:00 2013-09-07 00:00:00
9   New York      2 2013-09-07 00:05:00 2013-09-07 00:05:00
10   Chicago      2 2013-09-07 00:05:00 2013-09-07 00:05:00
11  Montreal      1 2013-09-07 00:06:00 2013-09-07 00:05:00
12   Chicago      1 2013-09-07 00:06:00 2013-09-07 00:05:00

In [153]: df = frame.groupby(['time_5min', 'city']).aggregate('sum')

In [154]: df
Out[154]: 
                              count
time_5min           city           
2013-09-07 00:00:00 Chicago       2
                    Montreal      6
                    New York      6
2013-09-07 00:05:00 Chicago       3
                    Montreal      1
                    New York      2

In [155]: df.reset_index(1)
Out[155]: 
                         city  count
time_5min                           
2013-09-07 00:00:00   Chicago      2
2013-09-07 00:00:00  Montreal      6
2013-09-07 00:00:00  New York      6
2013-09-07 00:05:00   Chicago      3
2013-09-07 00:05:00  Montreal      1
2013-09-07 00:05:00  New York      2
share|improve this question
2  
Can you give a short example data of the whole dataframe? –  joris Sep 5 '13 at 20:18
    
[((u'71.57.43.240', u'8.27.82.254', 33108, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 1), ((u'67.163.47.231', u'8.27.82.254', 50186, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 2), ((u'8.27.82.254', u'98.206.29.242', 25159, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 1), ((u'69.66.156.250', u'8.27.82.254', 59274, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 3), ((u'76.16.235.239', u'8.27.84.126', 48104, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 1), ((u'8.27.84.254', u'98.226.117.227', 63795, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 2), ((u'24.1.153.243', u'8.27.82.126', 18970, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 1), ((u'76.16.101.243', u'8.27.82.126', 41329, 80, 6, 1377565195000), 1), –  Stephen Thomas Sep 5 '13 at 20:31
    
You can edit you question to include it instead of as a comment. Where is the timestamp in this example? –  joris Sep 5 '13 at 20:34
    
last entry in the 6-tuple –  Stephen Thomas Sep 5 '13 at 20:36
1  
Do you already put it in a pandas DataFrame? How does that look like (is the tuple one column)? –  joris Sep 5 '13 at 20:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you set the date as the index you can use TimeGrouper (which allows you to group by, for example, 5 minute intervals):

In [11]: from pandas.tseries.resample import TimeGrouper

In [12]: df.set_index('data2', inplace=True)

In [13]: g = df.groupby(TimeGrouper('5Min'))

You can then count the number of unique items in each 5 minute interval using nunique:

In [14]: g['key1'].nunique()
Out[14]: 
2013-08-27 00:55:00    2
dtype: int64

If you're looking for a count of each tuple, you could use value_counts:

In [15]: g['key1'].apply(pd.value_counts)
Out[15]: 
2013-08-27 00:55:00  (71.57.43.240, 8.27.82.254, 33108, 80, 6)     1
                     (67.163.47.231, 8.27.82.254, 50186, 80, 6)    1
dtype: int64

Note: this is a Series with a MultiIndex (use reset_index to make it a DataFrame).

In [16]: g['key1'].apply(pd.value_counts).reset_index(1)
Out[16]: 
                                                        level_1  0
2013-08-27 00:55:00   (71.57.43.240, 8.27.82.254, 33108, 80, 6)  1
2013-08-27 00:55:00  (67.163.47.231, 8.27.82.254, 50186, 80, 6)  1

You'll probably want to give these more informative column names :).

Update: previously I hacked get get_dummies, see edit history.

share|improve this answer
    
I ♥ get_dummies, but there is probably a short-cut for get_dummies(x).sum() lol it's value_counts –  Andy Hayden Sep 5 '13 at 21:38
    
Nice trick with the TimeGrouper! But I think he wants to 'add the counts' (which is an existing column), and not to 'count the unique keys' –  joris Sep 5 '13 at 21:43
    
Yeah, it should be in the docs! (Also seems a shame you can't do it to a column...) –  Andy Hayden Sep 5 '13 at 21:46
    
(you could be right: maybe I don't follow the question...) –  Andy Hayden Sep 5 '13 at 21:50
    
Very nice, thanks. –  Stephen Thomas Sep 5 '13 at 22:01

If you just want to add together the counts for each unique tuple, just groupby key1:

df.groupby('key1').aggregate('sum')

If you want to do this for each time step and each unique tuple, you can give multiple column to group by:

df.groupby(['data2', 'key1']).aggregate('sum')

If different timesteps have to be combined in one 5min bin, a possible approach is to round your timestamp to 5 min, and then group by on that:

df['data2_5min'] = (np.ceil(df['data2'].values.astype('int64')/(5.0*60*1000000000))*(5.0*60*1000000000)).astype('int64').astype('M8[ns]')
df.groupby(['data2_5min', 'key1']).aggregate('sum')

If you want to preserve some of the original timestamps (but you have to choose which if you are binning them), you can specify a function to apply on the individual columns. For example take the first:

df2 = df.groupby(['data2_5min', 'key1']).aggregate({'data1':'sum', 'data2':'first'})
df2.reset_index(0, drop=True).set_index('data2', append=True)

If you just want to resample on 5 mins and add the counts regardless of the keys, you can simply do:

df.set_index('data2', inplace=True)
df.resample('5min', 'sum')
share|improve this answer
    
The keys are unique (but may not appear every time step). I would like to add the data1 (counts) together for each unique key - and then bin these into 5min bins - so the second approach –  Stephen Thomas Sep 5 '13 at 21:24
    
So the second approach is what you want? Or not yet? –  joris Sep 5 '13 at 21:29
    
This looks way nicer than mine, but it doesn't bin into 5 minute intervals (I guess you could make a column with rounded times?) –  Andy Hayden Sep 5 '13 at 21:40
    
@Andy Yeah, that's what I was trying (rounded times), but it is not clear to me if it is needed (maybe all the times are already 5-mins, and then it is just a simple groupby) –  joris Sep 5 '13 at 21:41
2  
@Andy Lol, another hack to round :-) df['data2'].map(lambda x: pd.DataFrame([0],index=pd.DatetimeIndex([x])).resample('5min').index[0]) –  joris Sep 5 '13 at 22:48

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