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I'm using OpenGL ES 2.0 on Android, but I assume this question is a general OpenGL question.

I'm learning OpenGL and am trying to understand exactly which APIs have to be called for every frame, versus only once. I was initially calling glVertexAttribPointer and glEnableVertexAttribArray every frame, but when I changed my test program to only call them once for each Shader program, I get behavior that isn't what I expect.

It seems like glVertexAttribPointer and glEnableVertexAttribArray should only have to be called once, rather than every frame, because they only make sense within the context of a particular Shader program. I say this because glVertexAttribPointer takes as it's first parameter GLuint index which was returned from glGetAttribLocation which specifies a string that corresponds to a variable name in the shader program. So it seems like the data is tied to a particular "attribute" variable in a particular shader program.

My test program renders two disjoint shapes (triangles), using two entirely different programs - different fragment shader source, different vertex shader source, separate calls to glLinkProgram etc. I initially ran the following code for every frame, and everything works as expected - I see both shapes rendered correctly.

m_glhook.glClear(GLES20.GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GLES20.GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

// Shape/Program 1          
m_glhook.glUseProgram(m_iGlProgramId);
int iPositionLocation = m_glhook.glGetAttribLocation(m_iGlProgramId, "a_Position");
m_bfVertices.rewind();
m_glhook.glVertexAttribPointer(iPositionLocation, 4, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false, STRIDE, m_bfVertices);
m_glhook.glEnableVertexAttribArray(iPositionLocation);    
gl.glDrawArrays(GLES20.GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);

// Shape/Program 2
m_glhook.glUseProgram(m_iGlProgramId2);
int iPositionLocation2 = m_glhook.glGetAttribLocation(m_iGlProgramId2, "a_Position");
m_bfVertices2.rewind();
m_glhook.glVertexAttribPointer(iPositionLocation2, 4, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false, STRIDE, m_bfVertices2);
m_glhook.glEnableVertexAttribArray(iPositionLocation2);
gl.glDrawArrays(GLES20.GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);

Then I modified the calls made for every frame as shown below. m_bFirstDraw is true for the first frame, and false for successive frames.

m_glhook.glClear(GLES20.GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GLES20.GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

// Shape/Program 1          
m_glhook.glUseProgram(m_iGlProgramId);
if (m_bFirstDraw)
{
    int iPositionLocation = m_glhook.glGetAttribLocation(m_iGlProgramId, "a_Position");
    m_bfVertices.rewind();
    m_glhook.glVertexAttribPointer(iPositionLocation, 4, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false, STRIDE, m_bfVertices);
    m_glhook.glEnableVertexAttribArray(iPositionLocation);
}
gl.glDrawArrays(GLES20.GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);

// Shape/Program 2
m_glhook.glUseProgram(m_iGlProgramId2);
if (m_bFirstDraw)
{           
    int iPositionLocation2 = m_glhook.glGetAttribLocation(m_iGlProgramId2, "a_Position");
    m_bfVertices2.rewind();
    m_glhook.glVertexAttribPointer(iPositionLocation2, 4, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false, STRIDE, m_bfVertices2);
    m_glhook.glEnableVertexAttribArray(iPositionLocation2);
}
gl.glDrawArrays(GLES20.GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);
m_bFirstDraw = false;

The behavior I see with the above code is that for the first frame everything is still fine (which makes sense since for the first frame the call sequences are exactly the same). But for successive frames Shape1 gets drawn with Shape2's vertices. So I only see Shape2 since it gets drawn exactly on top of Shape1.

Please help me understand this...why does setting the data (shape vertices) for one program affect the data used by another program in a successive frame? I'm missing something...

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although GLSL programs (vertex shaders in particular) use vertex attributes based on generic slot numbers, you do not actually supply the GLSL program with the vertex pointers.

These pointers are part of the Vertex Array state, which in newer versions of OpenGL is handled completely by Vertex Array Objects. If you want each program to have its own set of pointers, what I would suggest is that you create a VAO that stores the state and bind the VAO when you bind your program.

If VAOs are not available you will have to setup your pointers by hand whenever you switch GLSL programs. Note that in this case there is a global context in which the vertex array pointers, bound vertex buffers, enabled/disabled arrays, etc. are stored. So you have to be careful to disable vertex attrib arrays you are not using or you can wind up making GL read from invalid memory.

VAOs are a much more elegant solution, and you should favor them whenever they are available.

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Thanks a lot for the Answer Andon. Looking at the spec, VAOs are not available in OpenGL ES 2.0 so I won't be able to use them. So just to confirm, without VAOs it is necessary to call glVertexAttribPointer and glEnableVertexAttribArray every time I switch Programs. If I have multiple programs that run with every frame (in the same order), this effectively means I have to call those functions for every Program, for ever frame. Is that correct? –  David Stone Sep 6 '13 at 13:05
    
@DavidStone: Not necessarily, you only have to do this if you want to draw with a different vertex buffer or if you need the attribute pointers to map to different locations in order to supply the shader with the right data at the right binding location. –  Andon M. Coleman Sep 6 '13 at 13:13
    
OK I think I understand now. My two shaders need to operate on different vertices and they are both run in every frame, in the same order. So in that case it is necessary to call glVertexAttribPointer twice for every frame. For whatever reason, when I call glGetAttribLocation and let OpenGL choose the vertex attribute index for me, it always chooses 0 so I'm using the same index for both vertex attributes. However I found that glBindAttribLocation is available in OpenGL ES 2.0 and it allows me to specify different indices for the two programs, avoiding this problem. –  David Stone Sep 6 '13 at 19:56

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