Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list that contains a number of sublists. For example:

full_list = [[1, 1, 3, 4], [3, 99, 5, 2],[2, 4, 4], [3, 4, 5, 2, 60]]

I also have another list, called omit. For example:

omit = [99, 60, 98]

I want to remove the sublists inside of full_list, if any element in that sublist is in the omit list. For example, I would want the resulting list to be:

reduced_list = [[1, 1, 3, 4], [2, 4, 4]]

because only these sublists do not have an element that is in the omit list.

I am guessing that there is some easy way to pull this off with a list comprehension but I cannot get it to work. I have tried a bunch of things: For example:

reduced_list = [sublist for sublist in full_list if item for sublist not in omit] 
  • this code results in an error (invalid snytax) - but I think I'm missing more than that.

Any help would be much appreciated!

p.s., The above is a simplified problem. My end goal is to remove sublists from a very long list (e.g., 500,000 sublists) of strings if any element (a string) of those sublists is in an "omit" list contain over 2000 strings.

share|improve this question
    
You guys are awesome! Thank you for the responses. It worked like a charm on the longer lists. –  ansonw Sep 6 '13 at 1:40
add comment

3 Answers 3

Use set and all():

>>> omit = {99, 60, 98}
>>> full_list = [[1, 1, 3, 4], [3, 99, 5, 2],[2, 4, 4], [3, 4, 5, 2, 60]]
>>> [item for item in full_list if all(x not in omit for x in item)]
[[1, 1, 3, 4], [2, 4, 4]]

Main difference between this method and @alecxe's(or @Óscar López's) solution is that it all short-circuits and doesn't create any set or list in the memory while set-intersection returns a new set that contains all items that are common with omit set and it's length is checked to determine whether any item was common or not.(set-intersection happens internally at C speed so it is faster than normal python loops used in all)

Timing comparison:

>>> import random

No items intersect:

>>> omit = set(random.randrange(1, 10**18) for _ in xrange(100000))
>>> full_list = [[random.randrange(10**19, 10**100) for _ in xrange(100)] for _ in xrange(1000)]

>>> %timeit [item for item in full_list if not omit & set(item)]
10 loops, best of 3: 43.3 ms per loop
>>> %timeit [x for x in full_list if not omit.intersection(x)]
10 loops, best of 3: 28 ms per loop
>>> %timeit [item for item in full_list if all(x not in omit for x in item)]
10 loops, best of 3: 65.3 ms per loop

All items intersect:

>>> full_list = [range(10**3) for _ in xrange(1000)]
>>> omit = set(xrange(10**3))
>>> %timeit [item for item in full_list if not omit & set(item)]
1 loops, best of 3: 148 ms per loop
>>> %timeit [x for x in full_list if not omit.intersection(x)]
1 loops, best of 3: 108 ms per loop
>>> %timeit [item for item in full_list if all(x not in omit for x in item)]
100 loops, best of 3: 1.62 ms per loop

Some items intersect:

>>> omit = set(xrange(1000, 10000))
>>> full_list = [range(2000) for _ in xrange(1000)]
>>> %timeit [item for item in full_list if not omit & set(item)]
1 loops, best of 3: 282 ms per loop
>>> %timeit [x for x in full_list if not omit.intersection(x)]
1 loops, best of 3: 159 ms per loop
>>> %timeit [item for item in full_list if all(x not in omit for x in item)]
1 loops, best of 3: 227 ms per loop
share|improve this answer
    
Since you're already using a set, it'll be better and faster to use the native set operations. –  Anorov Sep 5 '13 at 20:28
    
@Anorov I could but creating a set in the memory just for checking it's length is useless. –  undefined is not a function Sep 5 '13 at 20:29
    
@AshwiniChaudhary awesome benchmark! –  alecxe Sep 5 '13 at 21:21
add comment

Try this:

full_list = [[1, 1, 3, 4], [3, 99, 5, 2], [2, 4, 4], [3, 4, 5, 2, 60]]
omit = frozenset([99, 60, 98])
reduced_list = [x for x in full_list if not omit.intersection(x)]

The only change that I made to the input data is that omit is now a set, for efficiency reasons, as it will allow us to perform a fast intersection (it's frozen because we're not going to modify it), notice that x doesn't have to be a set. Now the reduced_list variable will contain the expected value:

reduced_list
=> [[1, 1, 3, 4], [2, 4, 4]]
share|improve this answer
    
Better to have omit already as a set inside of converting it for each iteration of the loop. –  Anorov Sep 5 '13 at 20:28
    
@Anorov ahead of you :) –  Óscar López Sep 5 '13 at 20:29
    
+1 for frozenset, it's a bit faster (check minibenchmark in my answer) –  alecxe Sep 5 '13 at 21:12
add comment

Make omit a set, check for intersection on each step of iteration:

>>> full_list = [[1, 1, 3, 4], [3, 99, 5, 2],[2, 4, 4], [3, 4, 5, 2, 60]]
>>> omit = [99, 60, 98]
>>> omit = set(omit)  # or just omit = {99, 60, 98} for python >= 2.7
>>> [item for item in full_list if not omit & set(item)]
[[1, 1, 3, 4], [2, 4, 4]]

FYI, better use a frozenset instead of a set as @Óscar López suggested. With frozenset it runs a bit faster:

import timeit


def omit_it(full_list, omit):
    return [item for item in full_list if not omit & set(item)]

print timeit.Timer('omit_it([[1, 1, 3, 4], [3, 99, 5, 2],[2, 4, 4], [3, 4, 5, 2, 60]], {99, 60, 98})',
                   'from __main__ import omit_it').timeit(10000)

print timeit.Timer('omit_it([[1, 1, 3, 4], [3, 99, 5, 2],[2, 4, 4], [3, 4, 5, 2, 60]], frozenset([99, 60, 98]))',
                   'from __main__ import omit_it').timeit(10000)

prints:

0.0334849357605
0.0319349765778
share|improve this answer
    
I was going to post a solution using any(), but I think this is better and more Pythonic. –  Anorov Sep 5 '13 at 20:27
    
Note that omit & set(item) won't short-circuit and will create a new set in the memory. –  undefined is not a function Sep 5 '13 at 20:28
    
@AshwiniChaudhary yeah, it's actually interesting to see what is faster..depends on the input, of course. –  alecxe Sep 5 '13 at 20:29
    
@AshwiniChaudhary That's a good point, but due to the implementation set.intersection() may be faster even when taking into account short-circuiting from all(). It'd be interesting to see a benchmark. –  Anorov Sep 5 '13 at 20:29
    
@alecxe BTW you can use: not omit.intersection(item), that is going to be faster than not omit & set(item). –  undefined is not a function Sep 5 '13 at 20:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.