Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Pandas data frame object of shape (X,Y) that looks like this:

[[1, 2, 3],
[4, 5, 6],
[7, 8, 9]]

and a numpy sparse matrix (CSC) of shape (X,Z) that looks something like this

[[0, 1, 0],
[0, 0, 1],
[1, 0, 0]]

How can I add the content from the matrix to the data frame in a new named column such that the data frame will end up like this:

[[1, 2, 3, [0, 1, 0]],
[4, 5, 6, [0, 0, 1]],
[7, 8, 9, [1, 0, 0]]]

Notice the data frame now has shape (X, Y+1) and rows from the matrix are elements in the data frame.

share|improve this question
    
This kind of nesting is discouraged. Why do you need to do this? –  Phillip Cloud Sep 5 '13 at 21:19
    
See this question: stackoverflow.com/q/18641148/564538 –  Phillip Cloud Sep 5 '13 at 21:19
    
I want to retain the possibility of selecting the previous content of the matrix by a single column name after the merge. –  Mihai Damian Sep 5 '13 at 21:26
    
Why don't you just use two DataFrames? –  Phillip Cloud Sep 5 '13 at 21:30
1  
or use a panel... –  Andy Hayden Sep 5 '13 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import scipy.sparse as sparse

df = pd.DataFrame(np.arange(1,10).reshape(3,3))
arr = sparse.coo_matrix(([1,1,1], ([0,1,2], [1,2,0])), shape=(3,3))
df['newcol'] = arr.toarray().tolist()
print(df)

yields

   0  1  2     newcol
0  1  2  3  [0, 1, 0]
1  4  5  6  [0, 0, 1]
2  7  8  9  [1, 0, 0]
share|improve this answer
1  
I guess we can't really provide bulletproof shoes for users who insist on doing things like this :/ –  Phillip Cloud Sep 5 '13 at 21:33
1  
There are interesting things you can do with a column of lists, so I'd rather not assume this is necessarily a bad idea. Though I agree there is a high chance that it is. –  unutbu Sep 5 '13 at 21:41
1  
That's a wonderful example of pandas flexibility. In the case of this question, the data are already of homogeneous numeric type with equal-shaped rows, whereas in that example they are lists of different length. I agree that there are interesting things you can do. However, when you've already got a matrix why turn it into a list of lists? –  Phillip Cloud Sep 5 '13 at 21:47
    
In any case this question is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/18641148/564538. –  Phillip Cloud Sep 5 '13 at 21:53
4  
The world is a better place when creative people are allowed to do things everyone else thinks is stupid. :) –  unutbu Sep 5 '13 at 22:00

Consider using a higher dimensional datastructure (a Panel), rather than storing an array in your column:

In [11]: p = pd.Panel({'df': df, 'csc': csc})

In [12]: p.df
Out[12]: 
   0  1  2
0  1  2  3
1  4  5  6
2  7  8  9

In [13]: p.csc
Out[13]: 
   0  1  2
0  0  1  0
1  0  0  1
2  1  0  0

Look at cross-sections etc, etc, etc.

In [14]: p.xs(0)
Out[14]: 
   csc  df
0    0   1
1    1   2
2    0   3

See the docs for more on Panels.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.