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The Question

purely for academic reasons, I'm wondering if you could add a handler to a mysql stored procedure that is able to recover from a lock wait timeout error if one of its queries locks up (such as a SELECT ... FOR UPDATE or UPDATE) query.


The Example

This is assuming an innoDB database, set to issolation level Repeatable read, with an empty users table defined.

1. Example Procedure:

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS `lock_test`;
DELIMITER ;;
CREATE PROCEDURE `lock_test`(OUT status ENUM('success','timeout'))
    MODIFIES SQL DATA
BEGIN
    START TRANSACTION;

        SELECT * FROM `users` FOR UPDATE;
        SET status := 'success';

    COMMIT;
END;;
DELIMITER ;

2. Run code in mysql terminal 1:

START TRANSACTION;
SELECT * FROM `users` FOR UPDATE;
  • the contents of users will be displayed, but the transaction will remain open.

3. Run code in mysql terminal 2:

CALL `lock_test`(@out);
SELECT @out;
  • the transaction will run until it times out (default value of innodb_lock_wait_timeout is 50 seconds)

Is it possible to add a handler inside the lock_test() procedure, so that we can have @out hold 'timeout'?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

After spending some time reading through the MySQL Handler Documentation I was able to get what I was looking for:

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS `lock_test`;
DELIMITER ;;
CREATE PROCEDURE `lock_test`(OUT status_out VARCHAR(255))
    MODIFIES SQL DATA
BEGIN
    DECLARE procedure_attempts INT DEFAULT 5;
    DECLARE query_timeout INT DEFAULT FALSE;
    SET status_out := 'start';

    procedure_loop:
        REPEAT
            BEGIN
                DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR 1205
                -- Error: 1205 SQLSTATE: HY000 (ER_LOCK_WAIT_TIMEOUT)
                    BEGIN
                        SET query_timeout := TRUE;
                        SET status_out := CONCAT(status_out,'-timeout');
                    END;

                IF ( procedure_attempts < 1) THEN
                    LEAVE procedure_loop;
                END IF;

                START TRANSACTION;

                    SELECT * FROM `users` FOR UPDATE;

                    IF (query_timeout) THEN
                        SET query_timeout := FALSE;
                    ELSE
                        SET status_out := CONCAT(status_out,'-success');
                        SET procedure_attempts := 0;
                    END IF;

                COMMIT;

                SET procedure_attempts := procedure_attempts - 1;
            END;
        UNTIL FALSE END REPEAT;
    -- loop
    SET status_out := CONCAT(status_out,'-end');
END;;
DELIMITER ;

When run as follows:

SET @@innodb_lock_wait_timeout:=1;
CALL `lock_test`(@out);
SELECT @out;

The output will be start-timeout-timeout-timeout-timeout-timeout-end after about 10 seconds of running time (which would be much longer if run without setting the timeout to 1 second.

While probably not too practical (or advisable) in most projects, could potentially be useful when debugging timeout issues when running a query from inside another query - I hope it might help someone else in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
The instructions 'MODIFIES SQL DATA' was fixed problem in my giant procedure with lots of delete instructions (in different tables). Thanks. – Carlos A. Junior Feb 10 '14 at 16:58

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