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With gcc 4.7.2 this compiles just fine for me:

int main()
{
  int _ = 1;
  return 0;
}

Can I expect this to compile in general? I've read the answers about underscores as prefixes. But what if the underscore isn't prefixing anything?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A name (identifier) consists of a sequence of letters and digits. The first character must be a letter. The underscore character, _, is considered a letter.

From The C++ Programming Language, 4th Edition.

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2  
You can infer from that quote that the answer is "yes", but it would be nice to say so. –  Keith Thompson Sep 5 '13 at 22:48

According to Stroustrup (3rd edition, section 4.9.3), an identifier consists of a sequence of letters and digits. The first character must be a letter. The underscore character is considered a letter.

So, yes, it should be portable.

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1  
Beat you by 2 seconds! –  Brian Gordon Sep 5 '13 at 22:33
    
Also, in the C++ standard (2.11). –  nickie Sep 5 '13 at 22:35

Yes, _ is a valid identifier, since it meets the syntax requirements. Basically, an identifier consists of an underscore or letter, followed by zero or more other characters that can be underscores, letters or digits. (As of C++ 2011, identifiers can also contain universal character names and other implementation-defined characters, but that's not relevant to your question.)

But it's probably not one that you should use in your own code, unless you're very careful.

As this answer says, quoting the 2003 C++ standard:

Each name that begins with an underscore is reserved to the implementation for use as a name in the global namespace.

Your _ variable isn't in the global namespace, so you're safe in this case, but it's a good idea to avoid defining any identifiers starting with an underscore.

Also, I believe GNU gettext (which provides support for localized messages) uses the name _ for its own purposes. (It was arguably a bad idea for GNU gettext do to this, but it was a convenient choice.)

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Yes. a single _ will be accepted as variable or any identifier/namespace name! E.g. google mock uses this.

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Yeah it's a valid prefix. Running

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
char* _ = "Hello World";
cout << _ << endl; 
return 0;
}

prints out "Hello World" as expected. It's not a very helpful varible name but it is valid

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2  
Compiling or running it does not ensure standards-compliance or portability. –  Wayne McGee Sep 5 '13 at 22:46
1  
@WayneMcGee: Unless you either have access to LOTS of compilers [although it is likely to either fail or succeed in some compiler when the opposite should happen], or ask the compiler to be strict about standards [and again, strictness may be subject to compiler bugs]. –  Mats Petersson Sep 5 '13 at 23:37

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