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Moved to http://superuser.com/questions/80251/how-to-know-which-linux-distribution-im-using

How to know which Linux Distribution I'm using?

uname -a gives Linux xxxxxx.net 2.6.9-42.0.3.EL.wh1smp #1 SMP Fri Aug 14 15:48:17 MDT 2009 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux How can I know this is Ubuntu/Debian/Fedora or Redhat?

I uses /etc/init.d/serviced restart for restarting serevices, seems it is not Redhat family

Update:

[~]$ cat /etc/issue
cat: /etc/issue: No such file or directory
[~]$ cat /etc/issue.net
cat: /etc/issue.net: No such file or directory
[~]$ lsb_release -a
-sh: lsb_release: command not found
[~]$ cat /etc/*-release
cat: /etc/*-release: No such file or directory
[~]$ cat /etc/*-version
cat: /etc/*-version: No such file or directory
[~]$ cat /etc/*release
cat: /etc/*release: No such file or directory
[~]$ cat /etc/*_release
cat: /etc/*_release: No such file or directory
[~]$ cat /etc/*version
cat: /etc/*version: No such file or directory
[~]$
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closed as off topic by marcc, pavium, ephemient, Marc Gravell Dec 8 '09 at 6:13

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are you connecting by terminal? –  pcp Dec 8 '09 at 5:08
    
This should be on superuser or serverfault. It's not a programming question. –  marcc Dec 8 '09 at 5:14
    
If you are looking for a reliable way to make your program behave accordingly on any given distribution, I'd suggest updating your question before its migrated. –  Tim Post Dec 8 '09 at 5:20
    
I don't want to program anything, I just want to get disto info for installing a package. –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:35
    
underscore, not hyphen, in /etc/redhat_release. Try /etc/redhat* –  Peter Cordes Dec 8 '09 at 5:40

7 Answers 7

If you have lsb_release command,

lsb_release -a

will tell you (or just use lsb_release -i).

lsb_release is in Linux Standard Base Core Specification.

Edit: Looks like you're on a Red Hat system. A google search on your uname output suggests so. This is not programmatic, of course!

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$ lsb_release -a -sh: lsb_release: command not found –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:36
    
Judging from this and your other answers, looks like you have a really old linux system. –  Alok Singhal Dec 8 '09 at 5:42
    
lsb_relase was created to ease the pain of determining the distro easily from within a program. A lot of systems out in the wild and still in use lack this altogether. –  Tim Post Dec 8 '09 at 5:51
    
You're right. If someone is using that old a distribution, the first step should probably be to upgrade to a more recent version! :-) –  Alok Singhal Dec 8 '09 at 5:56

Try this:

cat /etc/*-release

You could also try /etc/*-version

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[itflux][~]$ cat /etc/*-release cat: /etc/*-release: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ cat /etc/*-version cat: /etc/*-version: No such file or directory –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:37

/etc/issue or /etc/issue.net give a good clue. Newer distros provide /etc/lsb-release which make it easier to determine exact strings progmatically, i.e. distro name / major & minor release / web site, etc.

In the absence of /etc/lsb-release, its much more difficult, hence the creation of lsb-release.

As Alok said, it looks like you are on a rather ancient (or extremely sparse) system. I don't think this is a case that you can (reliably) progmatically determine with a few lines of code.

If all else fails, check to see what kind of package manager is in use (apt / rpm / others), check to see if /etc/init.d is a symlink (rpm / RH distros) or a directory (debian based distros) .. and you have a pretty good clue as to what you can expect to be present in the root file system as far as structure.

You can't please everyone :)

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Debian and derivatives (Ubuntu) also have /etc/lsb-release. They also have the program lsb_release that will give you specific information (you don't have to parse the text file). –  MichaelM Dec 8 '09 at 5:14
    
@MichaelM: You're reading a file either way .. either directly opening /etc/lsb-release or scraping the output of lsb_release (either way, you're still reading a file even if its stdout). If doing this progmatically, its best to just parse the file yourself (imho) .. fewer moving parts that may or may not be present :) –  Tim Post Dec 8 '09 at 5:18
    
[itflux][~]$ cat /etc/issue cat: /etc/issue: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ cat /etc/issue.net cat: /etc/issue.net: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ lsb_release -a -sh: lsb_release: command not found –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:36
    
I uses /etc/init.d/serviced restart for restarting serevices, seems it is not Redhat family But apt-get and rpm are both giving command not found message –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:59
cat /etc/issue

for Ubuntu

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[itflux][~]$ cat /etc/issue cat: /etc/issue: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ cat /etc/issue.net cat: /etc/issue.net: No such file or directory –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:38

A list the release filenames for the most common distros: Release files

And a function that might help you: Shell script

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EL stands for Enterprise Linux in this case, so I think RedHat or a clone (like CentOS). I don't know a good way to programatically find out what distro you're on; there's a few different clues for each one.

cat  /etc/redhat_release
cat /etc/debian_version

is a good start. (Note the Ubuntu doesn't modify /etc/debian_version when they pull changes from Debian, so my Ubuntu Karmic system has squeeze/sid in debian_version.)

Edit: forgot about lsb. Good call, Tim Post and Alok. The whole point of LSB is to give distro-independent ways to do things.

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[itflux][~]$ cat /etc/redhat_release cat: /etc/redhat_release: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ cat /etc/debian_version cat: /etc/debian_version: No such file –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:40
    
EL could also be SuSE's Enterprise Linux, aka sles. It uses RPM like RedHat. Don't remember how to check for it. –  Peter Cordes Dec 8 '09 at 5:43
    
Oh yeah, Suse has some commands on top of rpm. If you have yast2 or yum, you're on SuSE. Look in /etc/ for suse or novell. –  Peter Cordes Dec 8 '09 at 5:48
    
There is no suse or novell folders under /etc [itflux][~]$ yum -sh: yum: command not found –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:52
    
I googled for your kernel version, and came up with surprisingly few results. rpm.pbone.net/index.php3/stat/4/idpl/3331503/com/… does indicate that it's RHEL or CentOS. (CentOS = RHEL without the support contract. Same versions of everything. Not sure if they manage to make all their binaries identical, but they try.) –  Peter Cordes Dec 8 '09 at 6:12

Seems like here's some info:

> cat /etc/issue
Welcome to SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 (i586) - Kernel \r (\l).

> uname -a
Linux boxname 2.6.5-7.244-smp #1 SMP Mon Dec 12 18:32:25 UTC 2005 i686 athlon i386 GNU/Linux

> cat /etc/*-release
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 (i586)
VERSION = 9
PATCHLEVEL = 3
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Whohooo someone does not like the answer, let's hear your opinion ... I've quite often tried to figure out what's running on a box, these are some of the things I look at, it tells you the kernel version, sometimes even the distro name ... –  stefanB Dec 8 '09 at 5:31
    
[itflux][~]$ cat /etc/issue cat: /etc/issue: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ cat /etc/issue.net cat: /etc/issue.net: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ lsb_release -a -sh: lsb_release: command not found [itflux][~]$ cat /etc/*-release cat: /etc/*-release: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ cat /etc/*-version cat: /etc/*-version: No such file or directory [itflux][~]$ –  Mithun Dec 8 '09 at 5:39
    
okay so you have not so standard linux, which is nothing new, but I assume at least uname -a give you some response ... –  stefanB Dec 8 '09 at 5:55

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