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I discovered today that Android can't display a small handful of Japanese characters that I'm using in my Japanese-English dictionary app.

The problem comes when I attempt to display the character via TextView.setText(). All of the characters below show up as blank when I attempt to display them in a TextView. It doesn't appear to be an issue with encoding, though - I'm storing the characters in a SQLite database and have verified that Android can understand the characters. Casting the characters to (int) retrieves proper Unicode decimal escapes for all but one of the characters:

String component = cursor.getString(cursor.getColumnIndex("component"));
Log.i("CursorAdapterGridComponents", "Character Code: " + (int) component.charAt(0) + "(" + component + ")");

I had to use Character.codePointAt() to get the decimal escape for the one problematic character:

int codePoint = Character.codePointAt(component, 0);

I don't think I'm doing anything wrong, and as String's are by default UTF-16 encoded, there should be nothing preventing them from displaying the characters.

Below are all of the decimal escapes for the seven problematic characters:

  1. ⺅ Character Code: 11909(⺅)
  2. ⺌ Character Code: 11916(⺌)
  3. ⺾ Character Code: 11966(⺾)
  4. ⻏ Character Code: 11983(⻏)
  5. ⻖ Character Code: 11990(⻖)
  6. ⺹ Character Code: 11961(⺹)
  7. 𠆢 Character Code: 131490(𠆢)

Plugging the first six values into http://unicode-table.com/en/ revealed their corresponding Unicode numbers, so I have no doubt that they're valid UTF-8 characters.

The seventh character could only be retrieved from a table of UTF-16 characters: http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/201a2/browsertest.htm. I could not use its 5-character Unicode number in setText() (as in "\u201a2") because, as I discovered earlier today, Android has no support for Unicode strings past 0xFFFF. As a result, the string was evaluated as "\u201a" + "2". That still doesn't explain why the first six characters won't show up.

What are my options at this point? My first instinct is to just make graphics out of the problematic characters, but Android's highly variable DPI environment makes this a challenging proposition. Is using another font in my app an option? Aside from that, I really have no idea how to proceed.

share|improve this question
    
Could it be a font problem? Have you tried another font? – Thilo Sep 5 '13 at 23:11
    
It probably is a font problem. I guess you could try finding a font that supports those characters and including it to see if it works. – Hyrum Hammon Sep 5 '13 at 23:13
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is using another font in my app an option?

Sure. Find a font that you are licensed to distribute with your app and has these characters. Package the font in your assets/ directory. Create a Typeface object for that font face. Apply that font to necessary widgets using setTypeface() on TextView.

Here is a sample application demonstrating applying a custom font to a TextView.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link, it looks simple enough. Do you have any recommendations for software I could use to pare down a TTF file to just the characters I need? And, so long as the Hex codes match up, I shouldn't have to worry about doing anything funny to display the characters with the new font, right? – IAmKale Sep 6 '13 at 14:19
    
@MasterKale: "Do you have any recommendations for software I could use to pare down a TTF file to just the characters I need?" -- it's been ages since I used a font editor, sorry. Moreover, I'm not quite sure why you want to do this anyway -- just show the whole string in the font that has the desired characters. "And, so long as the Hex codes match up, I shouldn't have to worry about doing anything funny to display the characters with the new font, right?" -- AFAIK, no. – CommonsWare Sep 6 '13 at 14:33
    
"Moreover, I'm not quite sure why you want to do this anyway -- just show the whole string in the font that has the desired characters." - Some of the fonts I'm finding are around 20MB uncompressed, and I'm not keen to deploy a font that's 40x the size of my app's APK. – IAmKale Sep 6 '13 at 14:39
    
@MasterKale: Ah, OK. That's probably support for lots of other languages' characters. Font editors should help you with this, but that's outside my bailiwick. – CommonsWare Sep 6 '13 at 14:44
    
You were exactly right, it was a font issue. I found a small CJK font, applied it to my TextViews as per your sample app, and all of the characters appeared. Thanks! – IAmKale Sep 6 '13 at 15:14

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