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I'm trying to count the number of characters and lines in a file using the following function.

void characterCount(ifstream& inf, string fName, int length [])
{       

    int charNum = 0;
    int lineNum = 0;

char character;

inf.get(character);
while (!inf.eof())
{
    // counts a line when an endline character is counted
    if (character = '\n')
        ++lineNum;      

    charNum++;
    inf.get(character);

    if (character = EOF)
        break;
}

inf.close();
inf.clear();

wordTabulate(inf, charNum, lineNum, length, fName);
}

void wordTabulate(ifstream& inf, int charNum, int lineNum, int count [], string fName)
{
inf.open(fName);
string word;
while (inf >> word)
{
    cout << word;
    count[word.size()]++;
}

inf.close();
inf.clear();
inf.open(fName);

output (inf, charNum, lineNum, count);
}

Unfortunately it will only count 1 line, 1 character, and will not classify the words based on size. All the other functions I wrote for it seem to work fine. I've tried a variety of different things for the character counter but nothing seems to work. Any help you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

Below I've added the output function. I'm sure there is a better way to output from an array but I'm not too worried about that right now.

void output(ifstream& inf, int charNum, int lineNum, int count [])
{
int words = 0;
cout << "Characters: " << charNum << endl;

words = totalWord(count);

cout << "Words: " << words << endl;

cout << "Paragraphs: " << lineNum << endl;

cout << "Analysis of Words: " << endl;

cout << "Size    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10+" << endl;

cout << "#Words" << count [2], count [3], count [4], count [5], 
                    count [6], count [7], count [8], count [9], count [10];
}

Here is the open file function which I believe is the culprit.

bool fileOpen(string fileName, ifstream& inf, int wordTypes [])
{
int charNum = 0;
int lineNum = 0;
cout << "File? >" << endl;                  // asks for file name
cin >> fileName;                            

// opens file and indicates if file can be opened
bool Repeat ();                             
{
    inf.open(fileName.c_str());  

    if (inf.is_open())
    {
        return true;
    }

    if (!inf.is_open())
    {
        return false;
    }
} 
} 
share|improve this question
4  
the problem is here: if (character = '\n') and here if (character = EOF), you meant if (character == '\n') and if (character == EOF) –  brunocodutra Sep 6 '13 at 0:14
    
That keeps it from counting only one character and line but now it never outputs and seems to be stuck in the while loop. –  user2752575 Sep 6 '13 at 0:30
    
have you checked the unix util 'wc -m/w/l' for reference? –  lpapp Sep 6 '13 at 0:30
1  
which of the two while loops is it stuck in now? You should be putting in the majority of the effort here. –  David Grayson Sep 6 '13 at 0:35
1  
Why are you closing the stream before you call wordTabulate, which tries to read from the stream? That seems likely to be wrong but I am not sure. Where is the source code of "output"? –  David Grayson Sep 6 '13 at 0:37

1 Answer 1

The problem in your first loop is that you don't read a character in the loop and also that you try to use eof() as an end condition. Neither works. You always need to check after reading that you successfully read the entity and eof() is not the condition you are looking for. Your loop should have a condition like this:

for (char value; in.get(value); ) {
    ...
}

The above loop will read through all the characters in the file and avoid any need to treat EOF special. That said, I always love constructive solutions to the problem. Here is mine:

void count(std::istream& in, int& chars, int& words, int& lines)
{
    bool word(false);
    std::for_each(std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(in),
                  std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(),
                  [&](unsigned char c) {
                      word = !std::isspace((++chars, c))
                          && (word || ++words);
                      c == '\n' && ++lines; });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Getting rid of the while loop seems to have fixed my previous problem but now it seems to be skipping the loop entirely. –  user2752575 Sep 6 '13 at 1:45
    
Well, you need to have something processing the characters! However, it should look like the for-loop I posted. ... or use an algorithm like in the other example I gave. –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 6 '13 at 12:27
    
I made it output each character while in the loop and I discovered that it is going through the loop but is not reading any characters. –  user2752575 Sep 6 '13 at 14:33
    
Which version of the loop? Mine or yours? –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 6 '13 at 14:37
    
Both I actually don't think its the loop at all but the open file function. I'll post it so someone can take a look at it. –  user2752575 Sep 6 '13 at 14:48

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