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I recently updated and reformatted my /etc/hosts file and would like to run through every system (roughly 1000) to refresh my known_hosts file. I'm looking at using an expect script to send "yes" to the RSA fingerprint question. Simple enough. However, I know some of these systems are completely new to me and my password has not been set. This creates two possibilities:

  1. "yes" is sent to the RSA fingerprint question and I'm logged into the server. I'll then need to send an exit to close the connection before moving onto the next host. Or...

  2. "yes" is sent to the RSA fingerprint question and I'm presented with the prompts to update my password starting with the current and followed by the new password entered twice. The connection will automatically close after the password is updated moving onto the next host.

I think I have a basic grasp of the concept of "if/else" in expect, but I don't fully understand how to nest them, if there is a better way, or if I'm completely off-base to begin with.

This is what I have right now:

set file1 [open [lindex $argv 0] r]

set pw1 [exec cat /home/user/.pw1.txt]
set pw2 [exec cat /home/user/.pw2.txt]

while {[gets $file1 host] != -1} {

    puts $host
    spawn -noecho "ssh $host"
    expect {
        "continue connecting"{
            send "yes\r"
            expect {
                "current" {
                    send $pw2\r
                } "New password" {
                    send $pw1\r
                } "Retype new password" {
                    send $pw1\r
                }
            }
        expect "msnyder"
        send "exit\r"
    }
    interact
}

The file1 variable is the list of hosts to run the script against.

I know it isn't accurate because it errors on line 22. But, I have no idea what needs to be fixed.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Two errors I spotted:

  1. missing close brace, probably for the "continue connecting" block
  2. missing space before the open brace of "continue connecting". Tcl (hence Expect) is very sensitive to whitespace as it is parsed into words before the commands are evaluated. For the very few gory details, see the 12 syntax rules of Tcl.

Your code might look like:

while {[gets $file1 host] != -1} {
    puts $host
    spawn -noecho "ssh $host"
    expect {
        "continue connecting" {
            send "yes\r"
            expect {
                "current" {
                    send -- $pw2\r
                    exp_continue
                } 
                "New password" {
                    send -- $pw1\r
                    exp_continue
                } 
                "Retype new password" {
                    send -- $pw1\r
                    exp_continue
                }
                msnyder
            }
            send "exit\r"
        }
    }
    interact
}

Notes:

  • exp_continue is used to "loop" back up to the expect statement: in this case, you will expect to see all of "current", "new" and "retype", so you don't want to bail out until you see your prompt.
  • get into the habit of typing send -- something. Without the double dash, you'll be surprised the day someone types in a password with a leading dash.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I'm looking through the code before I run it so I can get a feel for what it's doing and how to implement similar methods in the future. One thing that dawned on me is that I now have a couple systems that don't need the RSA fingerprint to be accepted. Does this script assume it will be asked? If it doesn't appear and drops straight to the command prompt on the remote server will the block be short-circuited and simply send the "exit" from the msnyder block? Seems like I would just need to move it up one level to be an "else" under the "continue connecting" "if". Is that correct? –  theillien Sep 6 '13 at 15:54
    
Or maybe I need it in two places: once after accepting the RSA fingerprint if presented and once in lieu of the RSA fingerprint if I've already accepted it. –  theillien Sep 6 '13 at 16:06
    
I ran the script. I think I'm seeing some changes that can be made to my method, but I"m running into problems with it. I'll probably consider this issue resolved and open another question with the new problem to keep a separation of issues. –  theillien Sep 6 '13 at 16:37

You can probably avoid having the script run like a human and just spawn an expected to fail ssh connection which will automatically accept the host RSA key and not bother with prompting for a password; you can do that later for new systems where you need to initiate a password.

Temporarily try adding this to your ~/.ssh/config file until your script is finished:

Host *
  Protocol 2
  PasswordAuthentication 0
  StrictHostKeyChecking 'no'
  CheckHostIP 'no'
  UserKnownHostsFile ~/.ssh/known_hosts_new

Then when the new know_hosts_new file is loaded up, you can replace the default ~/.ssh/known_hosts and remove the UserKnownHostsFile line from your config.

share|improve this answer
    
The RSA fingerprint bypass seems to be a good idea in general in an environment of this size. Although, I don't think I'd recommend it for environments that one doesn't feel completely trusting of. Thanks for the suggestion. I'll have to work out the remainder to handle systems that require password changes, though. That might be a simpler solution as it is one less nested if/else to deal with. –  theillien Sep 6 '13 at 15:33

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