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I am new to require.js and I need little guidance here.

/*
 * This app depends on jquery and a remote script called "remote.js" (serve over localhost :p)
 * Locally I will have main.js and require.js.
 * main.js contain an entry function "init" and it depends on jquery
 * and remote.js to be fully loaded.
 */
require.config({
    paths: {
        "jquery": "https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.1/jquery.min",
        "remote": "http://localhost:8000/scripts/remote"
    },  
    shim: {
        "init": {
            deps: ["jquery", "remote"]
        }  
    },  
    urlArgs: "bust=" + (new Date()).getTime()
});

define(["jquery", "remote"], function($, remote) {
    console.log("just entered the outerscope of the init function.");
    console.log(remote);
    return {
        init: function() {
            console.log("entered init function");
        }  
    }  
});

/* the following is in remote.js*/
function remoteF1() {
    console.log("remote function 1 is called.");
};

function remoteF2() {
    console.log("remote function 2 is called.");
};
// and I thought about wrapping them around with "define" or "require"
  1. I probably could define init.js, but say I want to keep that idea behind, how do I define a function called init inside this main.js file and use it as my entry-point which calls functions in remote.js??

  2. Also, do I have to repeat define/require(['jquery', 'remote']..... the dependency array again when I define my function? Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have so many options to do this, but all chooses will require that you use define inside remote.js.

You could use name-value pair, and have some problems when you need to use remoteF2 inside remoteF1:

define(["jquery"], function($) {
    return {
        remoteF1: function() {
            console.log("remoteF1 is called.");
        },
        remoteF2: function() {
            console.log("remoteF2 is called.");
        }
    }   
});

Now you can do this in your main.js:

define(["jquery", "remote"], function($, remote) {
    console.log("just entered the outerscope of the init function.");
    console.log(remote);
    var remote = new remote();
    remote.remoteF1();
});

Or you could return a js object:

define(["jquery"],function($){
    return function(){
        var privateFunction = function(){};
        this.remoteF1 = function () {
            privateFunction();
            console.log("remote function 1 is called.");
        };     
        this.remoteF2 = function () {
            console.log("remote function 2 is called.");
        };
    }
});

When you use remote.js you must declare using new remote(); should you choose the second method.

You need to set jquery dependency, because you don't know who will use you remote.js.

share|improve this answer
    
A few questions: (1) in the js object example, why is privateFunction() called inside the definition of remoteF1? What is the point of var privateFunction? Do I call (new remote()).privateFunction().remote1()?? Also, what about the init function which should call remoteF1 and remoteF2? Do I give an dep array of jqueyr and remote? I suppose the second method will allow me to get the object in the function parameter (I think the first one will give me undefined?) Thanks –  CppLearner Sep 6 '13 at 2:36
    
Opps I read it wrong. I should porbably call ((new remote()).remoteF1(), but the other options still apply :) –  CppLearner Sep 6 '13 at 2:44
    
OKay I understood now. Thanks. Going to update your post to fix some typo. –  CppLearner Sep 6 '13 at 4:27
    
yes,you're right, in the first example when I use the method of the remote.js I need to instantiate the remote.js –  Claudio Santos Sep 6 '13 at 11:47

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