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I need help with the matching pattern that would compare 2 numbers. Something like that:

let test x y =
   match x with
   | y when x < y -> printfn "less than"
   | y when x > y -> printfn "greater than"
   | _ -> printfn "equal"

Somehow it falls to the "_" case when x is 0 and y is 200. What am I doing wrong here?

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6 Answers 6

The problem with your code is that when you write:

match x with 
| y when x < y -> (...)

.. it means that you want to assign the value of x (the <expr> in match <expr> with) to a new variable named y (the <pat> in | <pat> when ...) and then compare this new y (which now contains the value of x) with the value of x - and so this will always return false. You can always rename the bound variable, so your code is the same as writing:

match x with 
| newY when x < newY -> (...)

Now you can see why this never matches - because you are just comparing x with itself!

Pattern matching is especially useful if you have inputs of some more complicated structure - like tuples or discriminated unions, lists, arrays, option types etc. But if you simply want to compare numbers, it is much easier to just use if:

let test x y =
  if x < y then printfn "less than"
  elif x > y then printfn "greater than"
  else printfn "equal"

In your match, you do not really need to bind any variables - but the solution by John demonstrates how you can make that work - it simply says, take variables x and y and assign them to new variables x and y (which just have the same name).

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A better version would be to pattern match on both numbers like so

let test x y =
   match (x,y) with
   | (x,y) when x < y -> printfn "less than"
   | (x,y) when x > y -> printfn "greater than"
   | _ -> printfn "equal"
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If you consult with Pattern Matching (F#) upon what type of pattern matching you use, then it would be so-called variable pattern, where new variable y within the match cases will be assigned the value of match expression x. As this y variable inside match statement shadows the original function parameter y, in the first and the second cases y would be simply getting value of x, hence when guards both fail. Then, the third catch-all match case _ kicks in, so you get "equal" return, as observed.

You can better see what happens if you explore the following snippet:

let f x y =
    match x with
    | y -> y

and try it with something like f arg1 arg2; f will be always returning arg1 regardless of arg2 value.

You may express your original intent still using matching with constant pattern by moving argument comparison into match expression:

let test x y =
    match sign (Operators.compare x y) with
    | 1 -> "greater than"
    | -1 -> "less then"
    | _ -> "equal"
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Interesting approach Gene. –  Onorio Catenacci Sep 6 '13 at 13:14

Pattern matching is a poor choice for that, use if instead:

if x < y then
  printfn "less than"
elif x > y then
  printfn "greater than"
else
  printf "equal"
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Similar to John Palmer's answer. I think writing it like this will improve your understanding of what is happening:

let test x y = 
    match (x,y) with
    | (a,b) when a < b -> printfn "less than"
    | (a,b) when a > b -> printfn "greater than"
    | _ -> printfn "equal"

In plain terms, when you use a Match statement, the terms in the pattern (i.e. the part before the ->) declare new identifiers. When you re-use y in your pattern, you are hiding the previous identifier y and creating a new one which has the same value as the thing on which you are matching, in this case the identifier x. In other words, you are always comparing the value of x to itself. As others have noted, this is probably best done with an if statement.

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replace match x with to match y with

let test x y =
       match y with
       | y when x < y -> printfn "less than"
       | y when x > y -> printfn "greater than"
       | _ -> printfn "equal"
share|improve this answer

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