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I'm trying to make a BST and need to print it inorder, postorder, and preorder.

The thing am not sure about is how to create this tree in my main() function.

struct Tree_Node
{
    Tree_Node *right;
    Tree_Node *left;
    int info;
};

class bTree
{
private:
    Tree_Node *root;
public:
    bTree();
    void bTree::Insert(Tree_Node*& tree, int item);
    void bTree::preorderPrint(Tree_Node *root);
};

bTree::bTree()
{
    root = NULL;
}


void bTree::Insert(Tree_Node*& tree, int item)
{
  if (tree == NULL)
  {
    tree = new Tree_Node;
    tree->right = NULL;
    tree->left = NULL;
    tree->info = item;
  }
  else if (item < tree->info)
    Insert(tree->left, item);    
  else
    Insert(tree->right, item);   
} 

void bTree::preorderPrint(Tree_Node *root)
{
    if ( root != NULL ) 
    {
        cout << root->info << " ";
        preorderPrint( root->left );   
        preorderPrint( root->right );   
    }
}

void main()
{
// This is where I need help at
// I'm not sure how to insert a new node

    bTree Test;
    Test.Insert(    
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? –  Matt Fichman Dec 8 '09 at 6:50
1  
By the way, Jake - welcome to SO! –  Smashery Dec 8 '09 at 7:01
    
Remove bTree:: qualifiers inside the class definition. Only few compilers still support this ancient syntax. –  avakar Dec 8 '09 at 7:54

2 Answers 2

By the looks of things, you can just write

Test.Insert(Test.root, 3); // Insert 3
Test.Insert(Test.root, 4); // Insert 4

and that should work. Of course, you'll have to make root public.

However, this is a bit awkward, since the first parameter will always be bTree.root - and you don't need to make that public. Remember that the user of your data type (you or anyone else) shouldn't have to care about internals such as nodes - they only care about their data. Instead, I'd recommend making a convenience Insert method which only needs to take an integer (not a tree node) - this is called Overloading.

void bTree::Insert(int item)
{
    Insert(root, item);
}

// Keep the other insert method, but make it private.

Then you can just write:

Test.Insert(3);
Test.Insert(4);
share|improve this answer
    
I originally had it that way The problem I have know is how to deal with the two arguments in void bTree::Insert(Tree_Node*& tree, int item) How do I deal with the Tree_Node*& tree ? –  Jake Dec 8 '09 at 6:43
    
I've updated my answer. Hope that helps. Have you heard of overloading before? –  Smashery Dec 8 '09 at 6:46
    
Just realised - in your existing Insert method, you will also need to check for node->left or node->right being NULL before passing it to Insert. This is so that you can actually insert it below another node (if you pass NULL to the Insert function, it won't know how to put in the tree, since it has no Node to insert it under). –  Smashery Dec 8 '09 at 7:06
    
I got it to work, but it's printing in the wrong order. Is that why since it is not making the node below? The book I'm reading shows the insert function like the way I have it, but it doesn't seem to work. –  Jake Dec 8 '09 at 16:54
void bTree::Insert(int item)
{
  Tree_Node * node = new Tree_Node;
  node->left = NULL;
  node->right = NULL;
  node->info = item;
  if (root == NULL)
  {
    root = node;
    return;
  }
  Tree_Node * t = root;
  Tree_Node * p = root;
  while(1)
  {
    if (item < t->info)
    {
       t = t->left;
       if(t == NULL)
       {
          p->left = node;
          return;
       }
    }
    else if(item > t->info)
    {
       t = t->right;
       if(t == NULL)
       {
          p->right = node;
          return;
       }
    }
    else //item already exists in the tree
       return;
    p = t;
  }

} 

//now you can insert nodes like
Test.Insert(5);
Test.Insert(6);
share|improve this answer
    
1. Tree_Node default constructor should assign the pointers to null. This eliminates the {worry} and assignment of null in lines 4 & 5. 2. Create a constructor in Tree_Node that takes an int. Assign the "info" data member using member initialization list: Tree_Node(int newValue) : left(NULL), right(NULL), info(newValue) { ; } 3. The node should have methods for linking to other nodes. –  Thomas Matthews Dec 8 '09 at 18:04
    
I was just showing him the insert function - the class is far from being perfect –  Amarghosh Dec 9 '09 at 4:15

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