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I have a little utility class called ContainerQuery which consists of zero or more ContainerQueryClause objects. After the user has prepared the query (i.e. added some clauses), the interface for my framework needs to get an object that supports:

interface IContainerQuery
{
    public IEnumerable<ContainerQueryClause> Clauses { get; }
}

What's the best implementation for IContainerQuery and why?

Option a)

class ContainerQuery
{
   public IEnumerable<ContainerQueryClause> Clauses { get; set; }
}

Option b)

class ContainerQuery
{
    public ContainerQuery()
    {
        Clauses = new List<ContainerQueryClause>();
    }

    public ICollection<ContainerQueryClause> Clauses { get; private set; }
}

Option c)

class ContainerQuery
{
    public ContainerQuery(IEnumerable<ContainerQueryClause> clauses)
    {
        Clauses = clauses;
    }

    public IEnumerable<ContainerQueryClause> Clauses { get; private set; }
}

Option d)

A combination of the above approaches or a completely different approach.

Side note 1: although ContainerQuery currently looks like "it is an enumerable of clauses" I want to model it for the future's sake as "has an enumerable of clauses".

Q: Is there a general best pracitce / pattern to create properties of type IEnumerable<T>? If not, which approach fits which situations?

Side question: Would you create the interface IContainerQuery to have your internal framework use the immutable version only or would you forbear from doing so as "your internal code is not stupid enough to change the query later on"?


Some additional context: the user instantiates a new container query and wants to add some clauses. There is no funky fluent interface or things like that. After passing the finished query to my framework, my framework only wants to read all the clauses and is not allowed to make any changes to it (per interface description).

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1  
This question doesn't have enough context at the moment. Sometimes you want a setter which allows for replacement. Sometimes you want to be able to specify a value on construction but not later. Other times - for IEnumerable<T> in particular - you actually don't want to return a list at all (as the execution-time type) but instead return a view on it (e.g. a ReadOnlyCollection). There's no one-size-fits-all here. –  Jon Skeet Sep 6 '13 at 6:12
    
I added some additional context, although there is not much more to say. Hope it is enough to make at least a decision for this special case if there is no chance for a general best practice / pattern. –  D.R. Sep 6 '13 at 6:16
    
Not really. We don't know whether this interface is exposed beyond your assembly, or what your code conventions are around "trusting" code within the same assembly, how much your code revolves around immutability (is ContainerQueryClause immutable, for example?) etc. There are many things to consider, basically. –  Jon Skeet Sep 6 '13 at 6:21
    
In the absence of more specific context, option b) is preferable. Allowing consumers to set the list is unusual and forces you to code more defensively inside the class itself. –  Igby Largeman Sep 6 '13 at 6:23
    
@JonSkeet: 1) The interface does not exist at all, currently only the concrete class exists. 2) In regards to trusting I hoped there is some C#-recommended way. In general, I trust the code, although I like to have the minimal required interface anywhere. 3) No, clauses are not immutable, they're currently consisting of four auto-properties. Immutability is important to me in some places, however, I guess in such little data holders it is too much. –  D.R. Sep 6 '13 at 6:25

1 Answer 1

Start with the following implementation. Why? It provides minimum knowledge and possibilities to the caller.

  • you can use the class with the default constructor => no thinking needed about what happens to the parameter
  • Clauses is always initialized => no need to check for null
  • Clauses is IEnumerable => minimum set of functionality, maximum flexibility for inner representation

If you can live with the implementation, you are done. If you think that a ContainerQuery without Clause doesn`t make sense, add it to the constructor so that the caller is forced to give a value. If you suggest that the caller need some methods from ICollection (adding/removing after construction of ContainerQuery) than use this interface. And so on ...

public class ContainerQuery : IContainerQuery
{
  public ContainerQuery()
  {
    Clauses = new List<ContainerQueryClause>();
  }

  public IEnumerable<ContainerQueryClause> Clauses { get; private set; }
}
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