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I'm trying to store a few variables in the binary's section (like __attribute((__section__("counters"))) ) and iterate over them, but I can't find how to get the starting direction of that section.

Reading GCC's documentation I found that (automagically?) two variables are created, in my case __start_counters and __stop_counters, but iterating over that memory segment doesn't seem to contain the data I'm looking for.

My question is: How can I store a few variables in a section and then get those variables?

EDIT:

Minimal compilable code showing what I'm trying to achieve.

#include <stdio.h>

char a, b, c;

struct counter_info {
    int counter;
    char *name;
} __attribute__((packed));

#define __PUT_STUFF_IN_SECTION(name)                    \
do{                                                     \
    static struct counter_info __counter_info_##name    \
    __attribute((__section__("counters")))              \
    __attribute((__used__)) = {                         \
        .name = #name,                                  \   <--------- this line causes *a lot of* errors, remove to actually compile the code
        .counter = 0,                                   \
    };                                                  \
}while(0)

extern struct counter_info __start_counters;
extern struct counter_info __stop_counters;

int main(int argc, char **argv){
    printf("Start!\n");

    __PUT_STUFF_IN_SECTION(a);
    __PUT_STUFF_IN_SECTION(b);
    __PUT_STUFF_IN_SECTION(c);

    struct counter_info *iter = &__start_counters;
    for(; iter < &__stop_counters; ++iter){
        printf("Name: %s | Counter: %d.\n", &iter->name, &iter->counter);
    }
    printf("End!\n");

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
That's interesting. Can you please post your code. –  trojanfoe Sep 6 '13 at 8:04
    
@trojanfoe Will do ASAP (I'm at work now) –  alexandernst Sep 6 '13 at 8:57
1  
@trojanfoe Please check my edit –  alexandernst Sep 6 '13 at 16:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just made your code compile and it works as expected:

--- foo.c       2013-09-06 19:43:28.025027688 +0200
+++ bar.c       2013-09-06 19:44:07.273028621 +0200
@@ -7,12 +7,12 @@
     char *name;
 } __attribute__((packed));

-#define __PUT_STUFF_IN_SECTION(name)                    \
+#define __PUT_STUFF_IN_SECTION(_name)                    \
 do{                                                     \
-    static struct counter_info __counter_info_##name    \
+    static struct counter_info __counter_info_##_name    \
     __attribute((__section__("counters")))              \
     __attribute((__used__)) = {                         \
-        .name = #name,                                  \
+        .name = #_name,                                  \
         .counter = 0,                                   \
     };                                                  \
 }while(0)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@

     struct counter_info *iter = &__start_counters;
     for(; iter < &__stop_counters; ++iter){
-        printf("Name: %s | Counter: %d.\n", &iter->name, &iter->counter);
+        printf("Name: %s | Counter: %d.\n", iter->name, iter->counter);
     }
     printf("End!\n");
share|improve this answer
    
Epic win, isn't it billiob? :P –  alexandernst Sep 6 '13 at 18:03

The manual's example is pretty decent. I've minimized it a bit for the this answer:

char stack[10000] __attribute__ ((section ("STACK"))) = { 0 };

main()
{
    /* Initialize stack pointer */
    init_sp (stack + sizeof (stack));
}

Notice how the code that references stack doesn't have to "iterate over a memory segment", it just deals with stack, and the compiler/linker will make sure that access is at the proper place depending on where the section ends up.

Typically you don't have to know or do anything in particular to access the variables; the fact that they have been put in a specific segment is something that is below the abstraction level of the language, in which all variables that are in scope are generally accessed by name just as usual.

share|improve this answer
    
Please check my edit –  alexandernst Sep 6 '13 at 16:38

You are pretty much right. The attribute with section will put the data in the right section and gcc (or rather the linker) will create the __start and __stop symbols.

Since you didn't post your code, I can't really say what's wrong with it, so instead I'll give you my implementation of the concept. The code is here on github.

There's code that deal with this for ELF, a.out and whatever Apple are calling their binary format on MacOS. There's also test code in there.

share|improve this answer
    
Apple call it mach-o. –  trojanfoe Sep 6 '13 at 8:17
    
Please check my edit –  alexandernst Sep 6 '13 at 16:38

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