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I have thought of different ways of declaring private variables. I want to know whether there are any differences between them.
First way:

//In .h file
@interface DataExtract : NSObject
{   
    @private
    double test;
}

Second way:

//In .m file. test is not declared in .h file
static double test;

Third way:

//In .m file. test is not declared in .h file
double test;

Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you.

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3  
The second and third ways are creating global variables in the .m file, not instances variables in the class! –  DocMax Sep 6 '13 at 7:55
    
May be you are looking for this stackoverflow.com/questions/1262463/… –  Hemant Sep 6 '13 at 8:03
1  
@Hemant why do you keep posting the same link? It is only needed once. –  Popeye Sep 6 '13 at 8:08
    
@Popeye Sorry that was posted again by mistake. –  Hemant Sep 6 '13 at 8:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

All of them are not a good solution if you want an ivar. I would even tend to only use properties with autogenerated ivars in an class extension in the implementation file only one line (@synthesize is automatically generated in Objective-C 3.0).

First way:

Yes this is an ivar, but you shouldn't declare it in the header file, if you declare it @private, then use the @implementation {...} block. In the implementation block you don't need to declare it @private, because it defaults to @protected, but in the implementation block it is not visible for subclasses

Second way:

That is a variable only visible in the translation unit, here the .m file itself. It is not global for the whole app. The value is persistent for every instance of your class, so it is no ivar (instance variable).

Third way:

That is also no ivar, it is a variable which defaults to extern, because you did not write static. That means it is in the global symbol table and can be used in other translation units /files if they #import/#include the .m file.

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Your second and third examples are not instance variables, but global variables (with differing scope) and the same value will be shared across the entire process.

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You can declare a private @interface in the .m file.

//DataExtract.m

@interface DataExtract ()
//your variables
@end

@implementation DataExtract

@end

For more info you can go here

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...however this won't compile for OSX 32-bit due to runtime restrictions. –  trojanfoe Sep 6 '13 at 8:01
    
@Hemant Again you have already posted your link 3 times in the comments, why have you edited this answer to include your answer? If you have an answer please give your own answer don't edit someone elses to include yours. –  Popeye Sep 6 '13 at 8:10
    
Downvoting because (while your answer is in itself correct) you don't point out the glaring misunderstanding of the OP. –  Nikolai Ruhe Sep 6 '13 at 8:10
    
Actually i am trying to post this as answer but my answer is posted as comments. –  Hemant Sep 6 '13 at 8:13
    
@Hemant instead of using the comments box use the answer box at the bottom of the page. –  Popeye Sep 6 '13 at 8:16

Is there a reason you want to use just an instance variable, instead of a property?

You can declare a private property like so:

// Private Interface in .m file
@interface DataExtract()

@property (nonatomic) double test;

@end

Edit: If you do want to use a private ivar, instead of a property, you could do it like so:

// Private Interface in .m file
@interface DataExtract() {
    double test;
}

@end
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There can be many reasons to use an instance variable instead of a property. The question is about how to define ivars. –  Nikolai Ruhe Sep 6 '13 at 8:43
    
I would not say there are many reasons to use an ivar over a property at all. Anyway, I've edited my answer to include how to do this. –  JoeFryer Sep 6 '13 at 9:07
    
I disagree with your assertion "generally a property is the 'better' way to go". Properties and ivars serve a different purpose or role in a class's design: A property is part of the API of a class. While not always publicly visible it interfaces with outside stuff. An ivar defines the encapsulated inner state of an object. –  Nikolai Ruhe Sep 6 '13 at 9:20
    
We can agree to disagree, but why the down vote? My advice (that generally a property is the 'better' way to go), I believe, is in-keeping with the generally accepted view on the subject. –  JoeFryer Sep 6 '13 at 10:08
    
No, that's exactly what I'm opposing. As I said, ivars have their place. If a part of an object's state is private that piece should not be exposed. Don't over-use properties. –  Nikolai Ruhe Sep 6 '13 at 10:19

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