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It seems like I need some help (again :/). My actual problem is a Timer. I created a Timer to execute a specific function every n-seconds. So far everything works, but the function seems to run over time. Why I expect that? Well, I did some Console.Writes to see whats going on, and I saw that sometimes it looks like my Timer is doing everything two times at the same time ...

Maybe one example of my Output-Console:

Start_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:18 ]
 Stop_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:18 ]
Start_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:23 ]
__StopMonitoring
Start_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:32 ]
 Stop_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:32 ]
Start_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:32 ]
 Stop_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:32 ]
Start_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:37 ]
 Stop_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:37 ]
Start_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:37 ]
 Stop_Monitoring  [ 06.09.2013 11:16:37 ]

Start-/Stop Monitoring is the Console.Write on top and bot of my function which is getting executed by my timer. The __StopMonitoring means the function to stop the timer got executed. Following the Code-Parts:

    public void Start_Monitoring()
    {
        Console.Write("Start_Monitoring  [[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[ " + System.DateTime.Now + " ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]\n");

        /* something will be done here ... */

        if (iCount_Popups > 0)
        {
            Stop_Monitoring();
            return;
        }
        else
        {
            /* something will be done here ... */
        }
        Console.Write("Stop_Monitoring  [[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[ " + System.DateTime.Now + " ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]\n\n\n\n\n");
    }

    public void Stop_Monitoring()
    {
        Console.Write("__StopMonitoring\n");
        myTimer.Stop();
    }

    // === #TIMER# ==================================================

    public System.Windows.Forms.Timer myTimer = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer();

    public void CreateTimer()
    {
        myTimer.Tick += new EventHandler(Timer_Event);
        myTimer.Interval = GeneralSettings.AdlibInterval;
        myTimer.Start();
    }

    public void Timer_Event(Object myObject, EventArgs myEventArgs)
    {
        Start_Monitoring();
    }
    // =========================================================================

I don't know if this Code-Parts will be enough to get some help, if not, I'd really appreciate it if you would let me know this.

I also tried to work with the Timer.Interval. GeneralSettings.AdlibInterval is equal 5000 (ms). I already thought about the problem that the things should be done in the interval needs more time then the Interval. That's not the problem here. The highest time needed which I could see was 1 sec, so lets say 2 secs. But e.g. an Interval of at least 10000 ms would be a way to much for the usage of this application.

Maybe some other information: Environment is Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Express - Windows Desktop Its an Windows-Form-Application ...and my first own C# Project. Therefore I assure that I did some research, but mostly I couldn't get solutions because everyone posted there code and nearly every time the mistake was done by the developer.

Edit:

    public void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {    
        CreateTimer();
    }
share|improve this question
    
You definitely calling CreateTimer() only once? –  Matthew Watson Sep 6 '13 at 9:40
    
why do you have private void TimerEvent(Object myObject, EventArgs myEventArgs) twice? –  Master117 Sep 6 '13 at 9:44
    
I edited my first post. Totally forgot about the Start-Call. No I do not. If this is getting stopped I do the same call again. I already thought about that, that this maybe could be the problem, but i couldn't find him. --- I copied it just two times here sorry. i'll edit this. –  Mike Wenzel Sep 6 '13 at 9:45
    
can you provide the code where you start the timer again? i cant see how you check if the timer stopped. –  Master117 Sep 6 '13 at 9:46
    
I don't check it anymore, I just did some Console.Writes to see if he is still running or not. Okay, I admit its for sure not the best way to do it. But it still shows me that my function isn't running anymore. Besides, take a look on the post by "Alessandro D'Andria" ;) But thank you too. –  Mike Wenzel Sep 6 '13 at 9:53

2 Answers 2

Your CreateTimer method is adding another Tick handler every time you clicks a button, so your tick event will be called the number of times you clicked button1.

Set interval and Tick handler in form designer or in form initialization / show method.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about this, and tried it, but I was so weird, I tried to set this just in the class definition without getting the idea of just pulling out the start-call. Thanks to you too ;) –  Mike Wenzel Sep 6 '13 at 10:03

Every time you click button1, you're creating a new timer. I think you should create timer in form constructor and start in button click event

public void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{    
    myTimer.Start();
}

Sorry I didn't put attention on the new but on the event handler

myTimer += ...
share|improve this answer
    
Sometimes it can be so easy ... "-.- Doing this little change and my Timer-Problem is gone. Well I have a little problem with my listed listview-items. I thought this will be caused by this problem, but seems like it doesn't. I'll first give it a better look now again, but in case that I do not find it. May I ask here again? im pretty new to stackoverflow. –  Mike Wenzel Sep 6 '13 at 9:50
    
Isn't he creating a new timer here: public System.Windows.Forms.Timer myTimer = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer(); He just starts it and sets the intervall, at leats it looks that way. But i think a Timer can have multiple instances started. –  Master117 Sep 6 '13 at 9:52
    
Well, you think the way I'm doing this is bad? Could u maybe give me some advice if you got the opinion that I should change this in a correct way even if this works? –  Mike Wenzel Sep 6 '13 at 9:55
    
Ok now i think this solution is correct. –  Master117 Sep 6 '13 at 9:58
    
You're registering many times the event, every time it fires call as many times your method. –  Alessandro D'Andria Sep 6 '13 at 9:59

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