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I'm trying to implement my own basic version of matrix multiplication in C and based on another implementation, I have made a matrix data type. The code works, but being a C novice, I do not understand why.

The issue: The I have a struct with a dynamic array inside it and I am initializing the pointer. See below:

// Matrix data type
typedef struct
{
    int rows, columns;      // Number of rows and columns in the matrix
    double *array;          // Matrix elements as a 1-D array
} matrix_t, *matrix;

// Create a new matrix with specified number of rows and columns
// The matrix itself is still empty, however
matrix new_matrix(int rows, int columns)
{
    matrix M = malloc(sizeof(matrix_t) + sizeof(double) * rows * columns);
    M->rows = rows;
    M->columns = columns;
    M->array = (double*)(M+1); // INITIALIZE POINTER
    return M;
}

Why do I need to initialize the array to (double*)(M+1)? It seems that also (double*)(M+100) works ok, but e.g. (double *)(M+10000) does not work anymore, when I run my matrix multiplication function.

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1  
Please: don't declare two types in one typedef, don't hide a pointer type in a typedef, don't use names with _t, they are reserved by POSIX, and use size_t for rows and colums. –  Jens Gustedt Sep 6 '13 at 10:08
    
No, _t is not reserved for POSIX. It is actually not reserved for anything. Although, one should only use it in type names. size_t isn't POSIX for example. –  Jocke Sep 6 '13 at 10:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

M+1 points to the memory that immediately follows M (i.e. that follows the two int and the double*). This is the memory you've allocated for the matrix data:

matrix M = malloc(sizeof(matrix_t) + sizeof(double) * rows * columns);
                                     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Using M+100 or M+10000 and then attempting to populate the matrix will result in undefined behaviour. This could result in a program that crashes, or a program that appears to work (but in reality is broken), or anything in between.

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The recommended method for this kind of stuff is unsized array used in conjunction with offsetof. It ensures correct alignment.

#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

// Matrix data type
typedef struct s_matrix
{
    int rows, columns;      // Number of rows and columns in the matrix
    double array[];         // Matrix elements as a 1-D array
} matrix;

// Create a new matrix with specified number of rows and columns
// The matrix itself is still empty, however
matrix* new_matrix(int rows, int columns)
{
    size_t size = offsetof(matrix_t, array) + sizeof(double) * rows * columns;
    matrix* M = malloc(size);
    M->rows = rows;
    M->columns = columns;
    return M;
}
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Thanks for this, I agree that it makes more sense not to hide a pointer type in typdef, as pointed out by Jens. However, I think you want to take offsetof(matrix, array), since matrix_t is not defined in your code... –  Zni Sep 6 '13 at 11:20
    
What is the correct way to add data to the array? My old methods, which I used with the first version of the code, do not work anymore. I just get "error: invalid use of flexible array member" whatever I try. –  Zni Sep 6 '13 at 11:37
    
Oh, that simple thing seems to work. However, I have problems setting all the values of the array simulataneously. Previously I wrote matrix* A = new_matrix(3, 2); double amatrix[] = { 3, 2, 8, 1, 9, 2 }; A->array = amatrix; but that does not work anymore. –  Zni Sep 6 '13 at 11:45
    
This code does not fill the array, it used to change the pointer (making all the memory you allocated right after the structure useless). To copy the contents of an array, use memcpy(). –  Medinoc Sep 6 '13 at 12:12
    
Thank you once again! –  Zni Sep 6 '13 at 12:28

You need to initialize it because otherwise (wait for it) it's uninitialized!

And you can't use an uninitialized pointer for anything, except to generate undefined behavior.

Initializing it to M + 1 is precisely right, and very good code. Any other value would fail to use the memory you allocated for this exact purpose.

My point is that the double * at the end of struct won't "automatically" point at this memory, which is the implied belief in your question why it should be initialized. Thus, it has to be set to the proper address.

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