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Example 1

Example 2

...Both of these use (from what I can tell) jquery's clone on a function block, as the outermost element of the script. Why is it done this way? What would be lost if that were omitted?

P.S. Is this like instantiating an object from a class?

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possible duplicate of jQuery Functions –  Qantas 94 Heavy Sep 6 '13 at 11:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is needed to call the function when the document is ready. As of http://api.jquery.com/ready/

$(document).ready(function() {
  // Handler for .ready() called.
});

Which is equivalent to calling:

$(function() {
     // Handler for .ready() called.
});

that obviously is equal to

jQuery(function() {
  // Your code using failsafe $ alias here...
});

here jQuery is used instead in order to not conflict with $ in case it's used by another library.

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1  
Thank you. Will accept once 12 minutes has passed. –  Arcane Engineer Sep 6 '13 at 10:46
    
Also mentioned here: api.jquery.com/jQuery/#jQuery3 –  kirilloid Sep 6 '13 at 10:46
    
Ah, and for the purposes of backbone.js, this is necessary since, in each Backbone.View, when you declare this.el (the DOM element providing the basis of that View), the named element will not be defined until the DOM is ready, so you will otherwise end up with this.el == undefined. –  Arcane Engineer Sep 8 '13 at 10:20

This is basically the DOMReady event. The function with your code is the code to be executed when the DOM is ready, but before all resources are loaded.

This ensures that all the HTML elements in your source code would be ready for manipulation in JS. Otherwise you may miss elements that are otherwise in your source code when trying to select them.

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