Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have trouble understanding the compilers. The following code does work in UNIX under g++, but under VC++ it would not even compile. Anyone can provide valid reasons why?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>


using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string tmp_nw_msg, crc_chksum, buffer;

    cout << "Enter the string : ";
    cin >> buffer;

    if (strlen(buffer.c_str()) >15 ) {
    	tmp_nw_msg = buffer.substr(1,12);
    	crc_chksum = buffer.substr(13,2);

    	cout << " N/W msg : "<< tmp_nw_msg << endl;
    	cout << " crc chksum : "<< crc_chksum << endl;
    }
    else {
    	cout << "error" << endl;
    }

    std::cin.get();
    return 0;

}

The following error is thrown by VC++, but in g++ it does work fine.

Error 1 error C2679: binary '>>' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'std::string' (or there is no acceptable conversion) c:\documents and settings\my documents\visual studio 2005\projects\dummy_substr\dummy_substr\substr.cpp 13 Error 2 error C2679: binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'std::string' (or there is no acceptable conversion) c:\documents and settings\my documents\visual studio 2005\projects\dummy_substr\dummy_substr\substr.cpp 19 Error 3 error C2679: binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'std::string' (or there is no acceptable conversion) c:\documents and settings\my documents\visual studio 2005\projects\dummy_substr\dummy_substr\substr.cpp 20 Error 4 fatal error C1075: end of file found before the left brace '{' at 'c:\documents and settings\my documents\visual studio 2005\projects\dummy_substr\dummy_substr\substr.cpp(9)' was matched c:\documents and settings\my documents\visual studio 2005\projects\dummy_substr\dummy_substr\substr.cpp 29

Output from g++ :

Enter the string : BD2d1100mayor47E N/W msg : D2d1100mayor crc chksum : 47

share|improve this question
1  
Which version of vc++ are you using? –  PierreBdR Dec 8 '09 at 9:03
    
MS Visual Studio 2005 –  halluc1nati0n Dec 8 '09 at 9:06
    
Unrelated to the question per se, why are you using strlen(buffer.c_str()) rather than buffer.length()? –  Liz Albin Dec 8 '09 at 15:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You need to replace #include <string.h> by #include <string>

C++ headers don't have the .h extension to differentiate them from C headers that would have the same name.

Also, you don't need the #include <stdio.h> header for your program -- and in case you need to call stdio functions from a C++ program you should #include <cstio> anyway.


EDIT: "If that really was the problem, the error should be on the definition of the string variables" commented by PierreBdR

In MSVC++, #include <iostream> creates a cascade of includes which at some point #include <stdexcept>. Then when you look at the stdexcept header file, you can see #include <xstring>. MSVC++ definition and implementation of std::string really is in this xstring header which explains why the compiler knows the type even-though you didn't #include <string>.

Then if you look at the content of the string header, you can see this is where binary operators compatible with std::string are defined which explains why the error only pops up on the line containing cin >> buffer; statement.

share|improve this answer
1  
If that really was the problem, the error should be on the definition of the string variables ... but I agree the OP should use standard headers? –  PierreBdR Dec 8 '09 at 9:02
    
This is weird, but it did work. Why or how? I also checked for '#include <cstring>', but the compile failed. –  halluc1nati0n Dec 8 '09 at 9:06
    
#include <cstring> is the C++ way of including string.h which by any way doesn't define the std::string type. –  Gregory Pakosz Dec 8 '09 at 9:07
1  
@PierreBdR > see my edit regarding your comment. –  Gregory Pakosz Dec 8 '09 at 9:23
2  
I wish I could give +2 for the in-depth autopsy. –  Adam Luchjenbroers Dec 8 '09 at 9:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.