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I know that interpreting C++ code might not hold practical value and this question is just for entertainment and learning purpose.

Is it possible to interpret C++ code statement by statement instead of compiling it? Please also explain the reason for the answer.

If it is not possible, is there a subset of the language that can be interpreted?

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3  
root.cern.ch/drupal/content/cint: "CINT is an interpreter for C and C++ code" –  fuenfundachtzig Sep 6 '13 at 11:08
2  
Cling. –  Fanael Sep 6 '13 at 11:08
    
...which will supersede CINT at some point. –  fuenfundachtzig Sep 6 '13 at 11:11
3  
If it can be compiled, there is not technical reason it cannot be interpreted. –  Neil Kirk Sep 6 '13 at 11:30
1  
For a slightly different angle, take a look at code.google.com/p/c-semantics - which is, in essence, a C interpreter implemented on top of a term rewriting engine. It deliberately does not lower the source language down to some simpler form (i.e., no "compilation" whatsoever), and is supposed to define C operational semantics in a clean, readable and yet formal way. –  SK-logic Sep 6 '13 at 11:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends on what you mean with "statement by statement." Most of the time, C++ is a strictly top-to-bottom language: if you want to use anything, you must have declared or defined it previously. So no problem here.

There are exceptions to the top-to-bottom approach, however. For example, the body of a class member function sees declarations of class data members which lexically follow it in source code. It is possible to call an inline function which has been declared, but not yet defined in the translation unit (the definition must appear before the TU ends, though).

These may or may not violate your notion of "statement by statement," depending on what exactly that notion is.

EDIT based on your comment:

If the interpreter has no outlook past the current statement, then it cannot possibly hope to interpret C++ code. Counterexamples using problem points given above:

#include <iostream>

struct C
{
  void foo() { std::cout << i << '\n'; }
  int i;
};

int main()
{
  C c;
  c.i = 0;
  c.foo();
}

Or

#include <iostream>

inline void foo();

int main()
{
  foo();
}

inline void foo()
{
  std::cout << "x\n";
}

It doesn't even have to involve inline functions:

extern int i;

int main()
{
  return i;
}

int i = 0;
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In other words, I mean the interpreter cannot lookout for coming lines. It can store anything necessary from previous lines. That member functions can access class members would not be a problem as long as the class header file is included before, which contains the member definitions. –  danijar Sep 6 '13 at 11:30
    
Thanks a lot for the update containing the code example. It is clear now, that only a subset of C++ can be interpreted with this underlying definition. Classes can't because their member order is not guaranteed. But what if we use a header file to define members and method signatures. –  danijar Sep 6 '13 at 11:58
    
@danijar You'd have to make sure the definition of main is the last declaration in the translation unit, and that all function definitions precede any namespace-scope variables (because functions could be called from their constructors). –  Angew Sep 6 '13 at 12:02
2  
goto also violates the top-to-bottom execution rule. Its labels may occur anywhere in the present function body. –  larsmans Sep 6 '13 at 12:04
    
@larsmans Very good point. It's probably the most straightforward counterexample there is. –  Angew Sep 6 '13 at 12:09

There's no clear-cut boundary between compilation and interpretation. Most languages that are usually thought of as interpreted are actually compiled for some kind of VM. The same can be done for C++.

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Okay, could C++ be interpreted statement by statement? I know that even most of the languages considered as interpreted, do more that that. For example JavaScript scans an entered scope for function definitions. But with scanning more than the current line, every compiled language could be interpreted. Therefore this is where I would like to set the boundary. –  danijar Sep 6 '13 at 11:13
    
@danijar: depends on what you mean by that. You can write an extremely stupid C++ interpreter that doesn't really compile anything but just inspects each statement every time to figure out what it's supposed to do. –  larsmans Sep 6 '13 at 11:17
1  
@danijar: if, by contrast, you mean an interactive toplevel like the one for Python, I guess that would be possible too but it wouldn't really be C++ (which executes whole functions, starting with main, not loose statements), so you'd be extending the language. –  larsmans Sep 6 '13 at 11:18
    
What I mean is the interpreter stats in main() and then reads one statement, executes it and continues with the statement below. And when a statement is a function call, the interpreter will jump to the first statement in the function body, of course. It is kind of how you may have learned programming. –  danijar Sep 6 '13 at 11:25

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