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I was working on my first OOP project, it is a random number generator, that generates a number of random numbers in a given range:

import random
import math

resList=[]

class randomInRange:
    def getRandom(self, start, end, quantity):
        for i in range(quantity):
            selList = range(start, end)
            resNum = random.choice(selList)
            resList.append(resNum)

        return (resList)

RR=randomInRange()

Then, I would type this in the Python Shell:

    (RR.getRandom(0,10,10))

and it would give something like this: [2, 2, 1, 4, 8, 1, 0, 7, 4, 5] But if I call the function again, it would append the new generatated numbers to the same list. So it would like something like this: [2, 2, 1, 4, 8, 1, 0, 7, 4, 5, 4, 5, 3, 1, 8, 6, 7, 5, 4, 4]

How do I get around this? How can I prevent fresh data to be appended to same list over and over again, which makes the list useless?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Make it a set - the values have to be unique. Or check to see if a value appears before you insert it. –  duffymo Sep 6 '13 at 11:18
    
I kinda need to learn about sets :/ I have just started python :) thanks for help :) –  GameNationRDF Sep 6 '13 at 11:21
2  
@duffymo That's not the problem :p –  TerryA Sep 6 '13 at 11:22
    
@user2754106 There's a good tutorial about them on the official python docs :) –  TerryA Sep 6 '13 at 11:24
    
@ Haidro thanks for the heads-up! :) gonna check them out ASAP :) –  GameNationRDF Sep 6 '13 at 11:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's because resList is a global variable and you never wipe its contents when calling randomInRange. You should just create the list in the function:

class randomInRange:
    def getRandom(self, start, end, quantity):
        resList = []
        for i in range(quantity):
            selList = range(start, end)
            resNum = random.choice(selList)
            resList.append(resNum)
        return (resList)

Note that your function can be replaced with a list comprehension too:

def getRandom(self, start, end, quantity):
    temp = range(start, end)
    return [random.choice(temp) for _ in range(quantity)]
share|improve this answer
    
Oh god, I don't know how I couldn't think of this, Jesus :S Thanks, sir! :D –  GameNationRDF Sep 6 '13 at 11:21
    
@user2754106 You're very welcome! Don't forget to accept an answer when you can! –  TerryA Sep 6 '13 at 11:21
    
Nicely done. Accept this, by all means. –  duffymo Sep 6 '13 at 11:24
    
@duffymo Thank you :)! –  TerryA Sep 6 '13 at 11:25
import random
import math

resList=[]

class randomInRange:
    def getRandom(self, start, end, quantity):
        for i in range(quantity):
            selList = range(start, end)
            resNum = random.choice(selList)
        if resNum not in resList:
                resList.append(resNum) 

        return (resList)

RR=randomInRange()
print RR.getRandom(0,10,10)
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't right. print RR.getRandom(0,10,10) again. And again... and again ;). And you'll see :) –  TerryA Sep 6 '13 at 11:26
    
Teah that is why I asked people :D And got a good answer, thanks for contrabution! –  GameNationRDF Sep 6 '13 at 11:32

Or even simplier would be the following

import random

def getRandom(start, end, quantity):
    return [random.choice(range(start, end)) for _ in range(quantity)]

print getRandom(0, 10, 10)
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. This is indeed compact and simple, thanks for the answer :) –  GameNationRDF Oct 13 '13 at 11:52

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