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I have already written a program that sorts a 2D array in increasing values.

Here is my input and output.

Input:

Array2D[0][0] = 99 Array2D[0][1] = 10 Array2D[0][2] = 97 Array2D[0][3] = 10 Array2D[0][4] = 14 Array2D[1][0] = 73 Array2D[1][1] = 53 Array2D[1][2] = 81 Array2D[1][3] = 22 Array2D[1][4] = 88

Output:

Array2D[0][0] = 10 Array2D[0][1] = 22 Array2D[0][2] = 53 Array2D[0][3] = 53 Array2D[0][4] = 73 Array2D[1][0] = 73 Array2D[1][1] = 81 Array2D[1][2] = 81 Array2D[1][3] = 88 Array2D[1][4] = 99

Now, what I want to know is the original position of values. E.g. Array2D[0][0] contains 10 now, but I also want to know where this 10 was before in input, here in this eg, it was in Array2D[0][3] in input. So, I want to original position of all the values.

I don't have much idea how to do this. Maybe use some additional struct to remember the position or to use pointers. Any help would be appreciated.

It can be done in C,C++.

Note: for Sorting, I converted 2D array into 1D array, and sort it using bubble sort and convert back to 2D array.

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This smells a bit homeworky :-) –  Benj Dec 8 '09 at 9:57
1  
Are you sure that's sorted? Your output doesn't match your input. –  Mongoose Dec 8 '09 at 9:57
    
Yes, it is, this is why, I proposed to get some hints only not the full solution, so that I can get along :) –  Curious Dec 8 '09 at 9:59
    
Haha, fair enough :-) Tagging as homework though ... –  Benj Dec 8 '09 at 10:00
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2 Answers

One simple way is that instead of storing only values in your original Array2D you store a small struct:

struct {
    int value;
    int position;
};

before you sort the array you store the position in the position variable. For a complete solution try something like this:

struct Element {
    Element() {}
    Element(int value) : value(value) {}
    bool operator < (const Element& rhs) const {return value < rhs.value;}
    int value;
    int position;
};

Element Array2D[2][5];
Array2D[0][0] = 99;
Array2D[0][1] = 10;
Array2D[0][2] = 97;
Array2D[0][3] = 10;
Array2D[0][4] = 14;
Array2D[1][0] = 73;
Array2D[1][1] = 53;
Array2D[1][2] = 81;
Array2D[1][3] = 22;
Array2D[1][4] = 88;
int elementCount = sizeof(Array2D) / sizeof(Element);
for (int i = 0; i < elementCount; ++i) {
    (&Array2D[0][0])[i].position = i;
}
std::stable_sort(&Array[0][0], &Array[0][0] + elementCount);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 You've gotta save the position to be able to retrieve it, and this is probably the 'tidiest' solution. –  Adam Luchjenbroers Dec 8 '09 at 9:52
    
Good solution, you could probably consider making position a short unless you're dealing with truly huge arrays. –  Benj Dec 8 '09 at 9:56
    
Just a guess, but likely the compiler would pad it anyway. May as well use an int. –  GManNickG Dec 8 '09 at 10:05
    
@Gman You're correct. Unless you're working on some kind of embedded system this will certainly be the case. –  Andreas Brinck Dec 8 '09 at 10:28
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Not sure if this is portable, but on my platform (VC9) I can just treat it as a 1d array and sort as normal, i.e.:

int array2d[2][5];
//fill array...

int *array = (int*)array2d;
//so  array[4] == array2d[0][4]
//and array[6] == array2d[1][1]

//sort as a 1d array using your favourite algorithm
...
share|improve this answer
    
This is portable, but it doesn't give you the original position. –  Andreas Brinck Dec 8 '09 at 12:12
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