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I have a very long and complex JSON to send to an external web service.
The JSON has all the properties at the same level:

public class Request
{
    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop1a")]
    public string Prop1A;

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop2a")]
    public string Prop2A;

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop3a")]
    public string Prop3A;

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop1b")]
    public string Prop1B;

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop2b")]
    public string Prop2B;

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop3b")]
    public string Prop3B;

    // [...]
}

The resulting JSON:

// valid JSON
{ prop1a: "", prop2a: "", prop3a: "", prop1b: "", prop2b: "", prop3b: "" }

In order to work better I have logically separated similar properties into smaller classes:

public class Request
{
    public AggregatedPropsA MyAggregatedPropsA;

    public AggregatedPropsB MyAggregatedPropsB;
}

public class AggregatedPropsA
{
    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop1a")]
    public string Prop1A;

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop2a")]
    public string Prop2A;

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "prop3a")]
    public string Prop3A;
}

The problem is that the json string is now invalid string because the properties are serialized on different levels:

// invalid JSON
{ MyAggregatedPropsA: { prop1a: "", prop2a: "", prop3a: ""}, MyAggregatedPropsB: { prop1b: "", prop2b: "", prop3b: "" } }

Is it possible to get a JSON like the first, using the second class structure?

Thanks!

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
var obj = new { x = new { a = 1, b = 2 }, y = new { c = 3, d = 4 } };

Func<JToken, IEnumerable<JProperty>> flatten = null;

flatten = token => token.Concat(token.SelectMany(t => t.Children().SelectMany(y => flatten(y))))
                    .OfType<JProperty>()
                    .Where(p => p.Value is JValue || p.Value is JArray);


var dict = flatten(JToken.FromObject(obj))
           .ToDictionary(p => p.Name, p => p.Value);


var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(dict);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I4V, unfortunately this method is not very flexible and doesn't allow me to discriminate the different properties. It would be good to have an attribute to mark properties that need to be flattened. –  StockBreak Sep 6 '13 at 14:31
    
@StockBreak If you explain the flexible part which is not clear in your question, I can post another alternative. –  I4V Sep 6 '13 at 17:23
    
I think you misunderstood my comment. I have tested your solution of course (and it works), but it doesn't fit because all of my inner objects would be flattened (I have inner classes that need to be nested as usual). As I said it would be good to have something that could be enabled/disabled with just an attribute. Thanks! –  StockBreak Sep 6 '13 at 17:51
    
@StockBreak This is my final offer :) –  I4V Sep 6 '13 at 19:12
    
Nice starting point! Thanks. –  StockBreak Sep 9 '13 at 10:21
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