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@arr1 = ( 1, 0, 0, 0, 1 );
@arr2 = ( 1, 1, 0, 1, 1 );

I want to sum items of both arrays to get new one like

( 2, 1, 0, 1, 2 );

Can I do it without looping through arrays?

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Are the numbers always 0 and 1? If so you could treat that as an integer and just add two integers together to give you a third integer with the same digits as that array. –  Benj Dec 8 '09 at 10:16
    
Obviously that also presumes that the number of digits is small. –  Benj Dec 8 '09 at 10:16
    
It's OK. I have only 0 and 1. –  Dmytro Leonenko Dec 8 '09 at 10:27
2  
Why don't you want to loop over them? Do you have some aversion to solving the problem and moving on in life? :) –  brian d foy Dec 9 '09 at 1:04
    
If the arrays are massive and speed is an issue consider PDL perlmonks.org/?node_id=598007 –  Matthew Lock May 25 at 5:37
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6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

for Perl 5:

use List::MoreUtils 'pairwise';
@sum = pairwise { $a + $b } @arr1, @arr2;
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Doesn't work for me dpaste.com/130683 –  Dmytro Leonenko Dec 8 '09 at 10:20
    
@melco-man: I thought you wanted the result to be in a reference to an array, otherwise square brackets are not needed –  catwalk Dec 8 '09 at 10:31
    
Doesn't work dpaste.com/130684 –  Dmytro Leonenko Dec 8 '09 at 10:33
3  
@melco-man: don't declare my($a,$b) - they are special variables here and 'pairwise' takes care of $a and $b localization for you –  catwalk Dec 8 '09 at 10:37
4  
This does actually loop through both arrays, it's just hidden inside of pairwise. –  Brad Gilbert Dec 8 '09 at 15:09
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If you're using Perl 6:

@a = (1 0 0 0 1) <<+>> (1 1 0 1 1)  #NB: the arrays need to be the same size

The Perl 6 Advent Calendar has more examples.

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But what about Perl 5? –  Dmytro Leonenko Dec 8 '09 at 10:05
    
See @catwalk for a Perl 5 implementation. –  rjstelling Dec 8 '09 at 10:17
5  
is <<+>> the hovercraft operator? –  Ether Dec 8 '09 at 17:57
    
@Ether, I think it may be the UFO operator. –  Technophile Jul 13 at 0:55
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Fundamentally, no, you can't do it without "looping through arrays" because you need to access every element of both arrays in order to sum them. Both the answers so far just hide the looping under a layer of abstraction but it's still there.

If you're concerned about looping over very large arrays, it's probably best to consider other ways of keeping the sum up-to-date as you go.

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what's wrong with looping over arrays? that's the fundamentals.

@arr1 = ( 1, 0, 0, 0, 1 );
@arr2 = ( 1, 1, 0, 1, 1 );
for ($i=0;$i<scalar @arr1;$i++){
    print $arr[$i] + $arr2[$i] ."\n";
}
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7  
For loops? in Perl? My god man, what are you doing? –  Ether Dec 8 '09 at 17:58
3  
i know exactly what i am doing. I don't like to think complicated, that's all. –  ghostdog74 Dec 9 '09 at 0:31
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You've seen a C style for loop, and pairwise. Here's an idiomatic Perl for loop and map:

my @arr1 = ( 1, 0, 0, 0, 1 );
my @arr2 = ( 1, 1, 0, 1, 1 );

my @for_loop;
for my $i ( 0..$#arr1 ) { 
    push @for_loop, $arr1[$i] + $arr2[$i];
}

my @map_array = map { $arr1[$_] + $arr2[$_] } 0..$#arr1;

I like map and pairwise best. I'm not sure that I have a preference between those two options. pairwise handles some boring details of plumbing for you, but it is not a built-in like map. On the other hand, the map solution is very idiomatic, and may be opaque to a part-time perler.

So, no real wins for either approach. IMO, both pairwise and map are good.

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If you're really afraid of looping, then you can binary chop the arrays, sum the pairs, then recursively reassemble the resulting array. No looping there, and as a bonus you get to learn how part of the fast-fourier transform derivation works.

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