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I have a child process running in foreground and his father is already exited.

the proc/$pid/stat file does not contain any more the parent pid if the parent is already exited and it display 1 instead of the origin parent pid

linux$cat /proc/6267/stat
6267 (test3.sh) S 1 6265 ......
#                 ^
#                 |
#        I expected to get the origin parent pid but I get 1

To reproduce this behaviour quickly we can use the following scripts

test2.sh

#!/bin/sh
echo "test2=$$"
./test3.sh &

test3.sh

#!/bin/sh
echo "test3=$$"
sleep 1000

execution:

linux$ ./test2.sh
test2=6318
test3=6319
linux$ ps aux | grep test
 6319 root      1484 S    {test3.sh} /bin/sh ./test3.sh
linux$ cat /proc/6319/stat
6319 (test3.sh) S 1 6318 2138 34816 6.......
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10  
Yes, orphaned processes are "adopted" by init (pid 1). This is by design, and to my knowledge there is no way to recover the original parent pid once the parent process has exited. – Frédéric Hamidi Sep 6 '13 at 15:40
10  
... and if you did kludge together a way, pids are eventually recycled, so that number might not mean what you think it means. – jthill Sep 6 '13 at 15:51

I don't think you can know the parent of a process after the (parent) has finished executing. But maybe you can have another program running which monitors your original program and maintains a log file or something. And orphaned processes are of course, adopted by init.

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