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My problem is that the console should stay opened. The timer cannot write anything into the console while Console.ReadLine() waits for an input. How do I prevent the console from closing without using Console.ReadLine(), Console.ReadKey() or system("pause")?

Here is my code:

namespace Closer {
    public static class Program {
        public static void Main () {
            // Define timer
            var t = new Windows.Forms.Timer() {
                Enabled = true,
                Interval = 30000
            };

            // Give timer the tick function
            t.Tick += (object tSender, EventArgs tE) => {
                // If it is half past eleven
                if (DateTime.Now.Hour.ToString() + DateTime.Now.Minute.ToString() == "2330") {
                    // Close all osu!.exe's --- works
                    foreach (Process p in Process.GetProcessesByName("osu!")) {
                        p.Kill();
                    }

                    // Write a msg
                    Console.WriteLine("Done!");
                }
            };

            // Prevent the console from closing --- Here's the problem
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
perhaps this stackoverflow.com/questions/14014165/… – dan_l Sep 6 '13 at 17:27
    
It seems there is some problem with System.Windows.Forms.Timer. I updated my answer with System.Timers.Timer. – Imran Sep 6 '13 at 18:34
    
The problem isn't with the Windows Forms timer, but rather with the way you were trying to use it. System.Windows.Forms.Timer expects to be used in a Windows Form application. More specifically, there has to be a Windows message loop running. That doesn't happen in a Console application. You'll notice that System.Timers.Timer, your program works just fine with the Console.ReadLine. – Jim Mischel Sep 6 '13 at 20:16
    
@JimMischel You shouldn't change the code in the OP like that. The specific problem here is because he's using the winforms timer. Changing his code to be a different timer and thus fixing the problem invalidates the question. You should post it as an answer, rather than an edit to the question. – Servy Sep 6 '13 at 20:19
    
@Servy: Thanks for pointing that out. I misread the comment from Imran, saying that he had changed the code. For some reason I thought that the OP had said that he changed the code. Man, my face is red. – Jim Mischel Sep 6 '13 at 20:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use System.Timers.Timer and everything works fine.

    static void Main()
    {
        // Define timer
        System.Timers.Timer t = new System.Timers.Timer()
        {
            Enabled = true,
            Interval = 1000
        };

        // Give timer the tick function
        t.Elapsed += (object tSender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs tE) =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Done!");
        };


        Console.ReadLine();
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. You can replace that Thread.Sleep with a Console.ReadLine. – Jim Mischel Sep 6 '13 at 20:13
2  
This answer is missing an explanation as to why the winform timer won't work while this one will. – Servy Sep 6 '13 at 20:19
    
@JimMischel I updated my answer with Console.ReadLine. – Imran Sep 7 '13 at 12:18
    
@Servy You are right... but I don't know the reason why it doesn't work :( I guess System.Windows.Forms.Timer works properly in Windows Forms Application as pointed by @Jim Mischel – Imran Sep 7 '13 at 12:22
    
It works!! Is the difference between System.Window.Forms.Timer and System.Timers.Timer really so big? – Cubinator73 Sep 9 '13 at 20:40

You are conflating two problems. Yes, an early release of .NET 4.5 made the mistake of having Console.ReadLine() take a lock that prevented threads from writing to the console. That was fixed, just turn on Windows Update to get the service release.

But the real problem is your Timer class selection. A System.Windows.Forms.Timer requires a message loop to get the Tick event to fire. You can only get a message loop by calling Application.Run(). A very suitable replacement for Console.ReadLine() btw, use Application.ExitThread() to get your app to terminate.

You should use System.Threading.Timer or System.Timers.Timer in a console mode app. Their callback is fired on a threadpool thread so don't require a dispatcher loop.

share|improve this answer

You can try this:

Thread.CurrentThread.Join();

I know this is stupid, but this does what you need. And the process will never terminate (itself) you've to kill manually.

share|improve this answer
    
This is like Thread.Sleep(Timeout.Infinite). – Cubinator73 Sep 6 '13 at 17:51
    
This answer doesn't work. – Imran Sep 7 '13 at 12:25
    
@Imran I thought OP is using Timers.Timer, you covered the other part.but still failed to explain why it works? – Sriram Sakthivel Sep 7 '13 at 12:39
    
@SriramSakthivel I don't know the exact reason why Forms.Timer doesn't work in a Console Application. A possible reason was explained by @Jim Mischel in his comments. – Imran Sep 7 '13 at 12:46
    
@Imran Reason is Forms.Timer will be fired in Main thread which is actually blocked and timer never gets fired where as Timers.Timer works because it uses ThreadPool Thread which is independent of Main thread – Sriram Sakthivel Sep 7 '13 at 12:50

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