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I've been asked to create a feedback page that can be requested from another site.

I'm using progressive enhancement to display the page.

The ajax request for when I am able to use a jquery dialog is as follows

    jQuery.support.cors = true;
    $.ajax({
        type: 'get',
        crossDomain: true,
        url: this.href
    }).done(function (data) {
        $dialogFeedback.html(data);
    }).error(function (jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
        $dialogFeedback.html(jqXHR.responseText || textStatus);
    });

During testing I have noticed Internet explorer seems to be allowing a cross domain call even when the response Access-Control-Allow-Origin HttpHeader is not set to be the client domain. I've noticed the Http origin header is always null.

Chrome and Firefox respect it. The Http origin header is not null.

The client site making the call is on a different port to the feedback site but both are localhost. I have read that a different port number is considered cross domain.

At the moment I find myself having to retrieve the caller/client domain from the Referrer Http header and returning a 404 if the domain is not known by us.

Really I was hoping to rely on the Access-Control-Allow-Origin HttpHeader!

. . . so my question is why is this happening? Is it actually expected/probable? What is the best solution?

Thanks

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If the origin header is missing, then the request is not cross-domain according to IE. IE violates the same-origin policy spec in several ways. First, it ignores port numbers. Second, IE will allow domains that are in the trusted zone to interact without applying the same origin policy. –  Ray Nicholus Sep 6 '13 at 19:35
    
Thanks Ray. I expected/feared as much. I'll leave my current approach in place then as IE can't be trusted. –  cheesesharp Sep 6 '13 at 19:49
    
Which of the 2 things I mentioned applies to your situation? –  Ray Nicholus Sep 6 '13 at 19:50
    
As I said in my question - the origin header is always null in IE and it is the same domain but different port numbers. Understanding a little more about cross domain requests it seems you are at the mercy of the browser so it's best to apply your own "known domain" policy. –  cheesesharp Sep 6 '13 at 19:54
    
Oh, sorry, I must have missed that in your question originally. Yea, IE sucks. What else is new? All other browsers are compliant though. –  Ray Nicholus Sep 6 '13 at 19:55

1 Answer 1

If the origin header is missing, then the request is not cross-domain according to IE. IE violates the same-origin policy RFC in several ways. First, it ignores port numbers. Second, IE will allow domains that are in the trusted zone to interact without applying the same origin policy

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