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i'm not sure of the most eloquent way to state this but i will give it my best. i have created a custom class that is a generic object with some properties. i have created a couple subclasses to extend that and make them more specific than the superclass. so for the sake of example i will throw out some generic example code that may or may not be proper syntax only to illustrate what i would like to accomplish.

@interface Vehicle : NSObject

@property (nonatomic) int wheels;

- (id)initWithNumberOfWheels:(int)wheels;

@end

from there i create some subclasses for same "car" & "truck" which give more detail to the class.

@interface Car : Vehicle

@property (nonatomic) BOOL convertible;
@property etc...

@end

and...

@interface Truck : Vehicle

@property (nonatomic) BOOL is4x4;
@property (nonatomic) int numberOfDoors;

@end

so here is where it gets interesting. i want to create another class that allocates those objects but i want the "type" of vehicle to be determined in the init method but use the same @property variable. so for example (and again, this is all garbage code just to give a visual representation)

Road.h

#import "Car.h"
#import "Truck.h"

@interface Road : NSObject

@property (strong, nonatomic) NotSureWhatToUseHereToMakeThisWork *myRide;
// doesn't work: @property (strong, nonatomic) id myRide; 
// doesn't work: @property (strong, nonatomic) Vehicle *myRide; 


- (id)initWithCars;
- (id)initWithTrucks;

@end

Road.m

@implementation Road

- (id)initWithCars
{
//standard init code...

    myRide = [[Car alloc] initWithNumberOfWheels:4];
    myRide.convertable = NO;
}

- (id)initWithTrucks
{
//standard init code...

    myRide = [[Truck alloc] initWithNumberOfWheels:6]; 
//yes, some trucks have more than 4 wheels

    myRide.is4x4 = YES;
}

@end

the bottom line is if i use the superclass in the @property it doesn't get the subclass properties obviously. basically i want to keep all this as generic and reusable as possible. it doesn't make since to make a special "road" class just for cars & one for trucks. a road is a road after all. is there anyway to do what i am after? is there a better way to do something like this? the primary purpose is to have objects that inherit specific properties for specific situations only. the reason i don't want to make extra @properties is i don't want those visible if they aren't applicable to the situation.

edit: i added a couple extra snippets to show what i tried before even posting this question that didn't work.

answer: the correct "answer" if anyone is curious is located in CRD's response in the "Addendum". the reason this works is the type "id" can only call methods and does not inherit properties. so rather the workaround (i say it that way, as i was researching this, came to the conclusion this is not good programming and should probably be avoid if possible) would be to use the accessor methods to get/set the property.

id mySomethingObject = [[SomeClass alloc] init...];
[mySomethingObject setPropertyMethod]...; //sets value
[mySomethingObject propertyMethod]...; //gets value

rather than trying to use...

mySomethingObject.property = ; //set
mySomethingObject.property; //get

as stated in the correct answer, if your class you allocated "id" to does not respond to that method your program will crash.

share|improve this question
1  
Use id or NSObject* or Vehicle*. The latter is generally preferred since it's the most specific that "encloses" the others. For simplicity have all your Vehicles implement a "type" method to return what they are, from a specific enum or such -- this is simpler than always testing isKindOfClass. – Hot Licks Sep 6 '13 at 19:24
    
i appreciate all the suggestions, unfortunately the main reason for me posting this question is i have tried all the offered suggestions with no luck. @HotLicks if i use "id" the compiler gives and error "Property "whatevermypropertynameis" not found on object type 'id'." – DoS Sep 6 '13 at 21:25
1  
Did you see my answer? You cast to the target type before making a reference to methods or properties of that specific type. – Hot Licks Sep 6 '13 at 23:19
    
@HotLicks feel free to type out an exact syntax of code to elaborate, because if you read through my other comments your suggestion doesn't work. the end "myRide" object has none of the "Car" or "Truck" properties available when doing the way you suggest. – DoS Sep 6 '13 at 23:33
1  
Dos, the folks who you're interacting with here likely have a combined programming experience in excess of 100 years. They know what they're talking about. You don't. – Hot Licks Sep 7 '13 at 11:48
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You appear to be confusing a number of issues.

First there is the type of an instance vs. the type of variables which hold references to instances. When an object is created is it of some specific type and that types does not change[*]. Variables also have a type, and that does not change either. Subtyping/inheritance allows you to store a reference to an object of some type, T, in a variable of some other type, S, provided S is a supertype of T.

Second there is static vs. dynamic typing. While Objective-C uses dynamic typing, where the actual type of objects used in some operation is determined at run time, the compiler itself uses static typing, where types are determined during compilation, to aid in writing correct programs. Sometimes the compilers static checking will just produce warnings, but in other cases the compiler will refuse to compile something. In particular property references are compiled based on static typing.

In your example this means you cannot directly reference a property of Car on an object referenced by a variable of type Vehicle *, even if you know the referenced object is a Car - as at compile time all that is known is that is it a Vehicle.

The solution is to first test the actual type of the referenced object and then introduce a local variable of the more precise type, or use a lot of casts. For example:

// (a) create an object of type Car (for a Reliant Robin ;-))
// (b) create a variable of type Car and store in it a reference to the created Car
Car *myCar = [[Car alloc] initWithNumberOfWheels:3];

// Create a variable of type Vehicle and store in it the reference stored in myCar
// The created instance is *still* a Car
Vehicle *myRide = myCar;

// See if myRide is a Car and then do something
if ([myRide isKindOfClass:Car.class])
{
    // create a variable of type Car to avoid having to continually cast myRide
    Car *myCarRide = (Car *)myRide; // due to if above we know this cast is valid

    if (myCarRide.isConvertible) ...

To do this without the intermediate variable you use a cast:

...
// See if myRide is a Car and then do something
if ([myRide isKindOfClass:Car.class])
{
    if (((Car *)myCarRide).isConvertible) ...

Which shows why the intermediate variable approach is better!

As a final example, you write your initWithTrucks method like this:

- (id)initWithTrucks
{
   //standard init code...

   Truck *myTruck = [[Truck alloc] initWithNumberOfWheels:6]; 
   //yes, some trucks have more than 4 wheels
   myTruck.is4x4 = YES;

   // Store the reference to the created Truck in myRide
   myRide = myTruck;
}

HTH

Addendum

From your comments it seems you may be looking for dynamic typing and do not wish to the compiler to perform any static typing. This is (partially) supported, but not using the dot notation for properties - you must use the getter and setter methods directly.

First, in Road you declare myRide to be type id:

@interface Road : NSObject

@property id myRide;

The id type means two things (a) any object reference and (b) do not statically check a method exists on the object. However the compiler must know that a called method exists on some object, and it will still perform static type checks on the arguments to the method - so its not complete dynamic typing (however you could pass id typed expressions or declare your methods to take arguments of type id of course...).

Second you make all references to properties use the getter or setter methods directly and do not use the dot notation (for non-property methods you just call them as usual). E.g.:

- (id)initWithTrucks
{
   //standard init code...

   myRide = [[Truck alloc] initWithNumberOfWheels:6]; 
   //yes, some trucks have more than 4 wheels
   [myRide setIs4x4:YES];
}

If you make a call such as [myRide setIs4x4:YES] and myRide is referencing a Car object then you will get a runtime error.

The general recommendation is to stick as much as possible with the compiler's static typechecking.

[*] We will ignore any runtime magic, there be dragons. In normal code objects never change type.

share|improve this answer
    
i am not confusing anything, and your answer is exactly what i didn't want to do. i know i could just have "myCar = ..." & "myTruck = ..." but as i said in the questions thats not what i am after. apparently the simple answer to this question is "no. objective-c doesn't let you do that". i wanted to keep it generic so any class allocating and then referencing my object would use "myRide" wether its a "Car" or a "Truck". this was simply to keep code reusable and more for proof of concept. but again, your answer sums it up best. it can't be done that way. – DoS Sep 6 '13 at 23:28
    
for @DoS: No, it cant be done in Objective-C [ * ], you cannot switch from one class to another (* for all others: yes, indeed it CAN be done: just use the common base class or protocol and use introspection to get runtime infos about the real object.) – vikingosegundo Sep 6 '13 at 23:34
    
@vikingosegundo thanks again, i had a feeling i was heading down a dead end but just wanted to get confirmation from the pros. – DoS Sep 6 '13 at 23:41
    
@DoS: did you ever saw something like you desire in any other language. Switching variable types? I never did. the rule is: you can assign that type or an subtype. but you wont change the type of the variable by assigning a subtype. and that doesnt mater, as a car is a vehicle, and a truck as-well. – vikingosegundo Sep 6 '13 at 23:43
1  
@CRD: While you are right, looking at the other answers and DoS' comments he just refuses to accept this. He is dreaming of some kind of switching property, while the normal OO Design would be to type the property with a more general type (super class) that accepts all possible sub-classes. As he does not understand, that a sub-class doesnt change it's type when assigned to a variable of a more general type, he can't see that it is exactly what he needs. – vikingosegundo Sep 7 '13 at 11:09

You have to use the type "Vehicle" and then cast your object with "Truck" or "Car" to get the specific properties

share|improve this answer
1  
You still need to cast (either to id, or to Car) to avoid a compiler warning when calling Car-specific methods regardless of the (runtime) check that the object is a Car. – Andrew Madsen Sep 6 '13 at 19:35

the most generic architecture would be to create a VehicleProtocol, that any class could implement. you still could have a Vehicle class that implements the protocol and subclass from it (similar to NSObject implementing the NSObject protocol), or let independent classes implement it. the road would have a property @property (strong) id<VehicleProtocol> myRide.


A complete example of the later architecture: no vehicle super class, but all a VehicleProtocol

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>


@protocol VehicleProtocol <NSObject>
@property (nonatomic) NSUInteger wheels;
@end

@interface Car : NSObject <VehicleProtocol>
@property (nonatomic) BOOL convertible;
@property (nonatomic) NSUInteger wheels;
-(id)initWithNumberOfWheels:(NSUInteger) numberOfWheels;
@end

@implementation Car
-(id)initWithNumberOfWheels:(NSUInteger) numberOfWheels
{

    if (self = [super init]) {
        _wheels = numberOfWheels;
    }
    return self;
}
@end


@interface Truck : NSObject <VehicleProtocol>

@property (nonatomic) BOOL is4x4;
@property (nonatomic) int numberOfDoors;
@property (nonatomic) NSUInteger wheels;
-(id)initWithNumberOfWheels:(NSUInteger) numberOfWheels;

@end

@implementation Truck
-(id)initWithNumberOfWheels:(NSUInteger) numberOfWheels
{

    if (self = [super init]) {
        _wheels = numberOfWheels;
    }
    return self;
}
@end




@interface Road : NSObject
@property (strong) id<VehicleProtocol> myRide;
@end

@implementation Road
@end

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    @autoreleasepool {

        NSArray *vehicles =  @[[[Car alloc] initWithNumberOfWheels:4], [[Car alloc] initWithNumberOfWheels:3], [[Truck alloc] initWithNumberOfWheels:10]] ;

        for (id v in vehicles) {
            if ([v isKindOfClass:[Truck class]]) {
                [v setIs4x4:YES];
            }
        }


        Road *road = [[Road alloc] init];
        road.myRide = vehicles[0];
        NSLog(@"%@", road.myRide);


        road.myRide = vehicles[2];
        NSLog(@"%@", road.myRide);

        NSObject *obj = [[NSObject alloc] init];
        road.myRide = obj; // warning in this line
        NSLog(@"%@", road.myRide);


    }
    return 0;
}

Sure it might have more lines of codes than with "classical subclassing", but there are less dependencies. Instead the classes agree on a contract to fulfill. Here the contract only requires the objects to have any number of wheels.

Note that I create a Road and assign first a car and than a truck (I also show how to identify cars and trucks via -isKindOfClass:), both works without any warning or error, as Car and Truck completely fulfill the contract. Than I assign a plain NSObject. Here the compiler warns, as he recognizes that NSObject does not implement the protocol. Though it is not an compiler error, as the compiler does not know, if you will use any protocol specific method on that object.

In case of a plain NSObject assigned to myRide, this line

NSLog(@"%@ %ld", road.myRide, (unsigned long)road.myRide.wheels);

will lead to a runtime crash (as an NSObject instance does not respond to wheel) — but at compile time it will not even trigger a warning.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the detailed response, unfortunately my real world code is for more complex then the sample code i posted. having that many protocol methods for all the properties would get unwieldily. – DoS Sep 6 '13 at 21:31
    
as I said: you can mix sub classing and protocols. with a certain degree of complexity there will be no other elegant way, as objective-c has no multi-inheritance. also protocols are great for defining modules and their interfaces. – vikingosegundo Sep 6 '13 at 21:44
    
btw: I am also a real world coder and make my money with working on real world codes. – vikingosegundo Sep 6 '13 at 21:46

Storing a Car in a variable of type Vehicle * does not remove the object's Car properties — the Car will still be able to access all of its state normally — it just means that you can't access the properties through that variable.

But that's the basic idea here, isn't it? You want this class to be able to handle all Vehicles, and that's what it's doing — it's only showing you the functionality available to all Vehicles. So you can have the interface necessary for interaction with a generic Vehicle in the Vehicle class, and implement the methods in your subclasses to do the class-appropriate behavior when called, and everything will work.

If the issue is specifically creating new instances of a specific class that you want to treat generically from that point on, you can use a statically typed local variable and assign to the generically typed variable once it's set up.

For example, let's say we have a game where there are human players and AI players, and the human player can give himself an advantage by making AI players take more damage. We could do this:

@interface Combatant : NSObject
@property(nonatomic, strong) NSString *name;
@property(nonatomic) int hitPoints;

- (void)takeDamage:(int)damageAmount;
@end

@implementation Combatant
- (void)takeDamage:(int)damageAmount {
    self.hitPoints -= damageAmount;
}
@end

@interface HumanCombatant : Combatant
@property(nonatomic, strong) UserID *userID;
- (id)initWithUserID:(UserID *)theID;
@end

@implementation HumanCombatant
- (id)initWithUserID:(UserID *)theID {
    if ((self = [super init])) {
        _userID = [theID retain];
    }
}

- (void)takeDamage:(int)damageAmount {
    [super takeDamage: damageAmount];
    NSLog(@"Human took %d damage, has %d health remaining", damageAmount, self.hitPoints);
}
@end

@interface AICombatant : Combatant
@property(nonatomic) double damageMultiplier;
@end

@implementation AICombatant
- (void)takeDamage:(int)damageAmount {
    int modifiedDamage = damageAmount * self.damageMultiplier;
    [super takeDamage: modifiedDamage];
    NSLog("AI took %d damage, has %d health remaining", modifiedDamage, self.hitPoints);
}
@end

Then, in most of our game code, we can use a variable typed as a Combatant *, and when you send it takeDamage:, it will do the right thing for the type of combatant it is. Our external code that calls the object a Combatant * will not be able to directly access an AICombatant's damageMultiplier property, because the other code doesn't know whether the Combatant is an AICombatant, but the object will still have that property and will behave correctly for its class.

share|improve this answer
    
Make the variable Vehicle*, have Vehicle implement a type method, do a switch or if on type to do type-specific stuff (after casting to the appropriate specific class). Once you cast to the specific type the type-specific methods are accessible. – Hot Licks Sep 6 '13 at 19:27
    
@HotLicks: I would do that as a last resort, but it is often a code smell. Method dispatch is already a giant type-specialized switch table, so whenever possible I prefer to hide the type-specific stuff behind generalized methods. (E.g. instead of if (target.type == AIPlayer) damage *= 1.2; target.hitPoints -= damage; I'd just have all possible targets implement takeDamage: and apply their multiplier as needed. – Chuck Sep 6 '13 at 20:12
    
To paraphrase Einstein, make as much stuff generic as possible, but no more. – Hot Licks Sep 6 '13 at 20:59
    
@Chuck your suggestion doesn't work because you do in fact lose the "car" properties. if store it as "Vehicle *myRide" i am able to access the vehicle properties but properties like "myRide.convertable" are not accessible. from my understanding a superclass does not know anything about its subclasses. inheritance is a one way street. by storing as "Vehicle *" there is no way for the Vehicle class to implement the subclass properties, or at least thats what i am finding. and just to be clear, and not meant to be a jerk, i've tried your solution and it in fact does not work. – DoS Sep 6 '13 at 21:19
1  
@DoS: No, you do not "lose" the properties — the properties are there, but the compiler just doesn't let you access them with dot notation through that variable. The object itself is still a Car and still has those properties. Typing the variable as Vehicle * tells the compiler "I am going to treat this object as a generic Vehicle, so only let me use messages and properties declared in the Vehicle interface." But if the object is a Car, it will still respond as a Car. Does that make more sense? – Chuck Sep 6 '13 at 21:26

Make it a Vehicle* and make each class implement type to return a constant indicating that class's type.

@property (nonatomic, strong) Vehicle* yourRide;
...
if (yourRide.type == VehicleConstant_Truck) {
  Truck* yourTruck = (Truck*) yourRide;
  NSLog(@"This truck %s a 4x4", yourTruck.is4x4 ? "is" : "isn't");
}

To make @vikingosegundo happy, an alternative approach is to do:

if ([yourRide isKindOfClass:[Truck class]]) {

instead of the if statement above.

share|improve this answer
    
why not just check for the Class? – vikingosegundo Sep 6 '13 at 21:58
    
You can check the class, but it's a hair more involved and less intuitive. – Hot Licks Sep 6 '13 at 23:18
1  
but maintaining the type property while you have the class type is unnecessary redundancy. so I'd call your approach much less intuitive and smelly. And if I am subclassing a class I dont own the code of, it gets real messy. – vikingosegundo Sep 6 '13 at 23:48
    
@vikingosegundo - Yeah, there are arguments both ways. – Hot Licks Sep 7 '13 at 0:05

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