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Firstly, I know this question has been asked before, both in this site and others, but the answers are all rubbish for my scenario (if they're not rubbish entirely), and (at least for the question here: jQuery UI drop event of droppable fires on sortable), the suggestion is just to turn off .sortable entirely, which is most certainly not what I want to do.

Okay, I have this jquery (keep in mind if any options or html ids look silly, this is just for testing so I can try and figure this out):

$(function () {
    $("#sortable").sortable({
        revert: true
    });
    $("#draggable, #draggable2").draggable({
        connectToSortable: "#sortable",
        helper: "clone",
        revert: "invalid"
    });

    $("#sortable").droppable({
        drop: function (event, ui) { alert("done been triggered."); }
    });

    $("ul, li").disableSelection();
});

And here is the valid markup:

<div class="objectPaletteHolder">
    <ul>
        <li id="draggable" class="ui-state-highlight">Drag me down</li>
        <li id="draggable2" class="ui-state-highlight">Drag this down, too</li>
        <li id="draggable2" class="ui-state-highlight">Drag this down, also</li>
        <li id="draggable2" class="ui-state-highlight">Drag this down, as well</li>
        <li id="draggable2" class="ui-state-highlight">Drag this down, too</li>
        <li id="draggable2" class="ui-state-highlight">Drag this down, too</li>
        <li id="draggable2" class="ui-state-highlight">Drag this down, too</li>
        <li id="draggable2" class="ui-state-highlight click">Drag this down, click</li>
        <li id="draggable2" class="ui-state-highlight clicky">Drag this down, clicky</li>
    </ul>
</div>
<div class="editContainer">
    <ul id="sortable">
        <li class="ui-state-default">Item 1</li>
        <li class="ui-state-default">Item 2</li>
        <li class="ui-state-default">Item 3</li>
        <li class="ui-state-default">Item 4</li>
        <li class="ui-state-default">Item 5</li>
    </ul>
</div>

I do not have overlapping sortable divs or anything like that, and I think I understand 'why' this is happening (because sortable gets draggables properties by default?), I just can't seem to do anything about it.

The problem, of course, is that the...

drop: function (event, ui) { alert("done been triggered."); }

...is being triggered twice, when it is only needed once.

I would think that there would be a simple solution to this problem, for if this problem required a bunch of complex scripting to fix, than I would think that these particular jquery widgets wouldn't be worth all the trouble. Perhaps I am just confused?

share|improve this question
    
What about a fiddle? –  Itay Sep 6 '13 at 19:27
    
@Itay As requested: jsfiddle.net/dMen8/6 –  VoidKing Sep 6 '13 at 19:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

That's a known issue using both sortable and droppable on the same element.

You can use the sortable's receive event instead.

jsFiddle Demo

$("#sortable").sortable({
        revert: true,
        receive: function (event, ui) {      
            alert("receive been triggered.");
        }
}).droppable({ });
share|improve this answer
    
omg, that's what I was after. I sifted through all sorts of events among the three different widgets, but I guess I didn't see "receive" or didn't think it applied to what I was after. Anyway, (this answer + you = the bomb-diggity). Thanks, man! –  VoidKing Sep 6 '13 at 19:47
    
Cool just notice that it's attached to the sortable, not the droppable :) –  Itay Sep 6 '13 at 19:48
    
Indeed. Also, I noticed that you have attached .droppable({}) after the .sortable Could this/should this be done separately? –  VoidKing Sep 6 '13 at 19:50
    
Yeah it could. I just prefer chaining. –  Itay Sep 6 '13 at 19:51
1  
By chaining you can avoid calling $("#sortable") again. The is just one less function call. So it's a little bit more efficient. If I recall correctly, you can cache this object ($sortable = $("#sortable")) and use this variable, and that way the getElementById won't be called again and again. This article may help Quick Guide: Chaining in jQuery –  Itay Sep 6 '13 at 19:59

Maybe I'm a little too late but I posted this hopefully it will help someone. This is the code I use. Basically, if the function is called twice, the interval between them should be quick (quicker than what human usually do) so I set the number to be 200 milliseconds.

I used localStorage to set a variable called "last_call". It's the time the function was called. In the next call, we will check if the function was called previously. If it wasn't called, the function will continue executing. If it was called, we will check when the last time it was called. If it was called within 200 milliseconds (which obviously machine call, not human call), we will not call it again.

    var d = new Date();
    var this_time = d.getTime();
    if ( localStorage.getItem("last_call") != null)
    {
        if ((this_time - parseInt(localStorage.getItem("last_call"))) < 100)
        {

            return;
        }

    }
    localStorage.setItem("last_call", this_time);
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't do this... –  Javier Apr 28 at 3:12
    
Can you explain why? –  codingpuss Apr 29 at 3:40

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