Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am reading the Android documents about MediaCodec and other online tutorials/examples. As I understand it, the way to use the MediaCodec is like this (decoder example in pseudo code):

    //-------- prepare audio decoder, format, buffers, and files  --------
    MediaExtractor extractor;
    MediaCodec codec;
    ByteBuffer[] codecInputBuffers;
    ByteBuffer[] codecOutputBuffers;
    extractor = new MediaExtractor();
    extractor.setDataSource();
    MediaFormat format = extractor.getTrackFormat(0);

    //---------------- start decoding ----------------
    codec = MediaCodec.createDecoderByType(mime);
    codec.configure(format, null /* surface */, null /* crypto */, 0 /* flags */);
    codec.start();
    codecInputBuffers = codec.getInputBuffers();
    codecOutputBuffers = codec.getOutputBuffers();
    extractor.selectTrack(0);

    //---------------- decoder loop ----------------
    while (MP3_file_not_EOS) {

        //-------- grasp control of input buffer from codec --------
        codec.dequeueInputBuffer();

        //---- fill input buffer with data from MP3 file ----
        extractor.readSampleData();

        //-------- release input buffer so codec can have it --------
        codec.queueInputBuffer();

        //-------- grasp control of output buffer from codec --------
        codec.dequeueOutputBuffer();

        //-- copy PCM samples from output buffer into another buffer --
        short[] PCMoutBuffer = copy_of(OutputBuffer);

        //-------- release output buffer so codec can have it --------
        codec.releaseOutputBuffer();

        //-------- write PCMoutBuffer into a file, or play it -------
    }

    //---------------- stop decoding ----------------
    codec.stop();
    codec.release();

Is this the right way to use the MediaCodec? If not, please enlighten me with the right approach. If this is the right way, how do I measure the performance of the MediaCodec? Is it the time difference between when codec.dequeueOutputBuffer() returns and when codec.queueInputBuffer() returns? I'd like an accuracy/precision of microseconds. Your ideas and thoughts are appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
Pseudo-code seems reasonable, though the devil is often in the details. You can't simply time how long a single buffer submission takes, because the codec might want to queue up more than one buffer before doing anything. You should measure it in aggregate, timing the duration of the entire file decode with System.nanoTime(). If you turn the copy_of into a no-op and just discard the decoded data, you'll keep the output side out of the calculation. –  fadden Sep 6 '13 at 22:41
    
@fadded: Thanks for the reply. Another question: if I really wanted to take file I/O out of the picture, can I bypass the MediaExtractor? I could write some code to read the source file into a large buffer, and copy the large buffer into decoder's input buffer, frame by frame. Is this approach recommended? –  hubeir Sep 7 '13 at 0:20
1  
It's possible but can be awkward depending on the format. As noted in the MediaCodec docs, the encoded input/output "is not a stream of bytes, it's a stream of access units". So you'd have to populate any necessary codec-specific-data keys in MediaFormat, and then identify individual frames of input so you can properly feed the codec. What might work instead is to do a separate pass where you just read the sample data, and then subtract that from the total time required for read + decode. It won't be perfectly accurate, but it'll be reasonably close. –  fadden Sep 7 '13 at 4:57
    
@fadded: Thanks again for your help. Measuring performance in two separately passes is an interesting idea. How do I just read the sample data without running the decoder? Could you explain in more detail? –  hubeir Sep 9 '13 at 17:44
    
Oops I spelled your name wrong... my apologies. –  hubeir Sep 9 '13 at 21:08

1 Answer 1

(merging comments and expanding slightly)

You can't simply time how long a single buffer submission takes, because the codec might want to queue up more than one buffer before doing anything. You will need to measure it in aggregate, timing the duration of the entire file decode with System.nanoTime(). If you turn the copy_of operation into a no-op and just discard the decoded data, you'll keep the output side (writing the decoded data to disk) out of the calculation.

Excluding the I/O from the input side is more difficult. As noted in the MediaCodec docs, the encoded input/output "is not a stream of bytes, it's a stream of access units". So you'd have to populate any necessary codec-specific-data keys in MediaFormat, and then identify individual frames of input so you can properly feed the codec.

An easier but less accurate approach would be to conduct a separate pass in which you time how long it takes to read the input data, and then subtract that from the total time. In your sample code, you would keep the operations on extractor (like readSampleData), but do nothing with codec (maybe dequeue one buffer and just re-use it every time). That way you only measure the MediaExtractor overhead. The trick here is to run it twice, immediately before the full test, and ignore the results from the first -- the first pass "warms up" the disk cache.

If you're interested in performance differences between devices, it may be the case that the difference in input I/O time, especially from a "warm" cache, is similar enough and small enough that you can just disregard it and not go through all the extra gymnastics.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. I will definitely experiment with the idea. –  hubeir Sep 9 '13 at 21:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.