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So, I have many data.tables I wish to combine into a single data.table with no duplicate rows. The 'naive' way to do this is to wrap an rbind call with unique: unique(do.call(rbind, list.of.tables))

This certainly works, but its pretty slow. In my real-world case the tables have two columns; a hash string and size. At this point in the code, they are un-keyed. I have played around with keying by hash first, but the gain in combining is offset by the time to key.

Here's how I benchmarked those options:

require(data.table)

makeHash <- function(numberOfHashes) {

  hashspace <- c(0:9, sapply(97:122, function(x) rawToChar(as.raw(x))))
  replicate(numberOfHashes, paste(sample(hashspace, 16), collapse=""))

}

mergeNoKey <- function(tableLength, modCount=tableLength/2) {

  A <- B <- data.table(hash=makeHash(tableLength), size=sample(1:(1024^2), tableLength))

  A[1:modCount] <- data.table(hash=makeHash(modCount), size=sample(1:(1024^2), modCount))

  C <- unique(rbind(A,B))
}

mergeWithKey <- function(tableLength, modCount=tableLength/2) {

  A <- B <- data.table(hash=makeHash(tableLength), size=sample(1:(1024^2), tableLength))

  A[1:modCount] <- data.table(hash=makeHash(modCount), size=sample(1:(1024^2), modCount))

  setkey(A, hash)
  setkey(B, hash)

  C <- unique(rbind(A,B))
}

require(microbenchmark)
m <- microbenchmark(mergeNoKey(1000), mergeWithKey(1000), times=10)
plot(m)

I've played around with tableLength and times and seen no big difference in performance. I feel like there HAS to be a more data.table-ish way to do this.

In practice I need to do this with many data.tables, not two, so scalability is very important; I just wanted to keep the above code simple.

Thanks in advance!

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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you want to use rbindlist and unique.data.table...

C <- unique( rbindlist( list( A , B ) ) )
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6  
+1 Btw, unique gains by in v1.8.10 (on CRAN) for more flexibility (thanks to Steve), and list() no longer copies named inputs (as in this example) in GNU R v3.1.0 (which v1.8.10 knows about and likes). –  Matt Dowle Sep 6 '13 at 20:37
    
Wow, surprised I missed that. I'm getting a more modest gain than I was hoping for; is there no better way? –  ClaytonJY Sep 6 '13 at 20:49
1  
@ClaytonJY take the rbinding out of the function and test just the difference in rbind vs. rbindlist. I think you'll find most of the time is spent elsewhere in your functions. –  Simon O'Hanlon Sep 6 '13 at 20:50
    
@MatthewDowle -- Very interesting. Does that mean that ab <- list(a,b) doesn't actually immediately copy a and b? Or are there some other rules for when a and b are copied, and when they aren't? –  Josh O'Brien Sep 6 '13 at 21:06
4  
@JoshO'Brien That's right, ab <- list(a,b) won't copy a or b, just increment the reference counter (NAMED) instead. Since list is primitive as well, and we use list() quite a lot in data.table (both internally and in queries) it might make a significant difference (haven't tested yet). –  Matt Dowle Sep 6 '13 at 21:16
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